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Author Park, H.R.; Choi, S.J.; Jo, H.; Cho, J.W.; Joo, E.Y.
Title Effects of Evening Exposure to Light from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes on Melatonin and Sleep Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Clinical Neurology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Neurol
Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 401
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Background and Purpose

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) emit less blue light than traditional light-emitting diodes (LEDs), but the effects of OLED light exposure (LE) on melatonin and sleep have not been evaluated.

Methods

Twenty-four healthy subjects (age 26.9±5.7 years; including 18 females) with the intermediate chronotype were exposed to three different light conditions [4,000 K 150 lux OLED LE, 4,000 K 150 lux LED LE, and dim light (DL) at <10 lux] for 6.5 h from 17:30 to 24:00, in a random order and with a 1-week interval. Participants entered the unit for the experiment at 16:00, and their daylight was measured by actigraphy from 8:00 to 16:00 during each session. Saliva samples for melatonin were taken every hour from 18:00 to 24:00. Sleep was monitored by polysomnography, and vigilance was evaluated by psychomotor vigilance test upon awakening.

Results

Melatonin onset occurred at 21:11±01:24, 21:20±01:19, and 21:36±01:16 in the DL, OLED, and LED conditions, respectively. Melatonin onset was significantly delayed under LED LE compared to DL (p=0.007) but did not differ under OLED LE (p=0.245). Melatonin suppression, sleep parameters, and vigilance were similar among the three light conditions. The accumulated amount of daytime light in each session was negatively correlated with the melatonin onset time under the DL (rho=−0.634, p=0.002) and OLED (rho=−0.447, p=0.029) conditions, not under the LED condition (p=0.129).

Conclusions

Melatonin onset under OLED LE was not significantly delayed compared to DL. Exposure to sufficient daylight may advance melatonin onset even when a subject is exposed to OLED LE in the evening.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1738-6586 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3046
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Author Elgert, C.; Hopkins, J.; Kaitala, A.; Candolin, U.
Title Reproduction under light pollution: maladaptive response to spatial variation in artificial light in a glow-worm Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B.
Volume 287 Issue 1931 Pages 20200806
Keywords Animals; glow-worms; Lampyris noctiluca; insects; maladaptive response; reproduction
Abstract The amount of artificial light at night is growing worldwide, impacting the behaviour of nocturnal organisms. Yet, we know little about the consequences of these behavioural responses for individual fitness and population viability. We investigated if females of the common glow-worm Lampyris noctiluca—which glow in the night to attract males—mitigate negative effects of artificial light on mate attraction by adjusting the timing and location of glowing to spatial variation in light conditions. We found females do not move away from light when exposed to a gradient of artificial light, but delay or even refrain from glowing. Further, we demonstrate that this response is maladaptive, as our field study showed that staying still when exposed to artificial light from a simulated streetlight decreases mate attraction success, while moving only a short distance from the light source can markedly improve mate attraction. These results indicate that glow-worms are unable to respond to spatial variation in artificial light, which may be a factor in their global decline. Consequently, our results support the hypothesis that animals often lack adaptive behavioural responses to anthropogenic environmental changes and underlines the importance of considering behavioural responses when investigating the effects of human activities on wildlife.
Address Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; christina.elgert(at)helsinki.fi
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3049
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Author Takemura, Y.; Ito, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Okano, K.; Okano, T.
Title Adaptive light: a lighting control method aligned with dark adaptation of human vision Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 11204
Keywords Human Health; Vision; Lighting
Abstract Light exposure before sleep causes a reduction in the quality and duration of sleep. In order to reduce these detrimental effects of light exposure, it is important to dim the light. However, dimming the light often causes inconvenience and can lower the quality of life (QOL). We therefore aimed to develop a lighting control method for use before going to bed, in which the illuminance of lights can be ramped down with less of a subjective feeling of changes in illuminance. We performed seven experiments in a double-blind, randomized crossover design. In each experiment, we compared two lighting conditions. We examined constant illuminance, linear dimming, and three monophasic and three biphasic exponential dimming, to explore the fast and slow increases in visibility that reflect the dark adaptation of cone and rod photoreceptors in the retina, respectively. Finally, we developed a biphasic exponential dimming method termed Adaptive Light 1.0. Adaptive Light 1.0 significantly prevented the misidentification seen in constant light and effectively suppressed perceptions of the illuminance change. This novel lighting method will help to develop new intelligent lighting instruments that reduce the negative effect of light on sleep and also lower energy consumption.
Address The Smart Life Science Institute, ACROSS, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. okano@waseda.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32641723; PMCID:PMC7343865 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3050
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Author Melville, H.I.A.S.; Conway, W.C.; Hardin, J.B.; Comer, C.E.; Morrison, M.L.
Title Abiotic variables influencing the nocturnal movements of bobcats and coyotes Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Wildlife Biology Abbreviated Journal Wildlife Biology
Volume 2020 Issue 3 Pages
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Despite the increasing spatial, temporal and dietary overlap between bobcats Lynx rufus and coyotes Canis latrans, these species live sympatrically throughout much of North America. To determine if differential activity patterns relative to abiotic variables might influence interspecific interactions, we investigated whether these species responded differentially to crepuscular and nocturnal abiotic variables in Texas. Using GPS collars, we calculated hourly movements from sequential locations, and compared bobcat and coyote movements relative to sex, season, moonlight intensity, night period, crepuscularity and temperature. We used generalized linear mixed effects models (GLMM) to investigate the responses of bobcats and coyotes to variables associated to their nocturnal movements. Temperature and its interactions with various abiotic variables influenced bobcat movements. Biological season and its interactions with other abiotic variables influenced coyote movements. Bobcats moved shorter hourly distances than coyotes. Female bobcats moved shorter hourly distances than males. Moonlight intensity seemed to influence coyotes but not bobcats. Differential movements between bobcats and coyotes relative to night period could possibly be due behavioral avoidance of coyotes by bobcats. Reduced crepuscular activity by coyotes may be behavioral avoidance of humans. Differential responses to nocturnal variables may dampen competitive interactions between bobcats and coyotes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0909-6396 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3052
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Author Rosolen, S.-G.; Brugère-Picoux, J.; Leroy, E.
Title Le chat est-il une victime collatérale de la pollution lumineuse? // Is the cat a victim of light pollution? Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Bulletin de l'Académie Vétérinaire de France Abbreviated Journal Bul. de l'Ac. Vét. de France
Volume in press Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract There are more than 75 million cats in Europe, a number that is constantly increasing. It is an animal that adapts very well to a reduced space and can live alone. However, it is also a preda-tor, a behavior that requires frequent wandering away from its familiar environment. Along with the dog, it is the most medicalized animal species and whose life expectancy is increasing. Living in close contact with man, it shares its environment, and is thus subjected to the same environmental impacts such as light pollution : reduction of darkness in time and space and its replacement by artificial light. A recent study has shown that 45% of sedentary cats are overweight or even obese. We hypothesize that among the factors favouring obesity, the extension of domestic lighting would play an important role. In human, obesity is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, which is a public health problem. The same is true for obese cats. As a clinical expression of a homologous human disease, it is THE animal model of type 2 diabetes so much sought after by the scientific community. Light pollution presents another risk for the wandering cat: the probability of encountering wild animals (rodents, mus-telids, birds, etc.) which, especially during the confinement period, are attracted by the space released by humans. This risk is important to consider because of the cat’s sensitivity to coronaviruses, in particular Sars-CoV-2, which it is likely to contract from with the wild animals that it may encounter. In the context of a pandemic situation, the question of unrestricted itinerancy of cats must be addressed. Cats should only be allowed to roam freely when they are vaccinated and undergo regular anti-parasite treatments.

//

Il y a plus de 75 millions de chats en Europe et leur nombre ne cesse d’augmenter. C’est un animal qui s’accommode très bien d’un espace réduit, qui peut rester seul mais c’est aussi un chasseur qui peut demander à sortir fréquemment de son environnement familier. Avec le chien, c’est l’espèce animale de compagnie la plus médicalisée et dont l’espérance de vie augmente. Il vit étroitement au contact de l’homme, partage son environnement et est soumis aux mêmes impacts environnementaux que ce der-nier, notamment la pollution lumineuse ; c’est à dire la réduction de la part d’obscurité en temps et en espace et son remplacement par des lumières artificielles. Une étude récente a montré que 45% des chats sédentaires sont en surpoids, voire obèses. Nous émettons l’hypothèse que, parmi les facteurs favorisant l’obésité, l’allongement de l’éclairage domestique jouerait un rôle important. Chez l’homme, l’obésité est un facteur de risque d’apparition du diabète (type 2) qui est un problème de santé publique. Chez le chat obèse, il en est de même. Exprimant cliniquement la maladie humaine homologue c’est LE modèle animal de diabète de type 2 tant recherché par la communauté scientifique. La pollution lumineuse fait courir un autre risque au chat qui se promène : la probabilité de rencontre avec la faune sauvage (ron-geurs, mustélidés, oiseaux, etc.) qui, notamment en cas de confinement, est attirée par l’espace libéré par l’homme. Ce risque est d’autant plus à prendre en considération que le chat est une espèce sensible aux coronaviroses, notamment le Sars-CoV-2 qu’il pourrait contracter au contact de la faune sauvage. Dans un contexte de pandémie, la question de la libre circulation des chats doit se poser et ne devraient sortir librement que les animaux vaccinés et subissant régulièrement des traitements antiparasitaires.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language French Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2259-2385 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3053
Permanent link to this record