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Author Gatford, K.L.; Kennaway, D.J.; Liu, H.; Schultz, C.G.; Wooldridge, A.L.; Kuchel, T.R.; Varcoe, T.J.
Title Simulated shift work during pregnancy does not impair progeny metabolic outcomes in sheep Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals; developmental programming; maternal; metabolism; progeny; sheep; shift work
Abstract KEY POINTS: Maternal shift work increases the risk of pregnancy complications, although its effects on progeny health after birth were not clear. We evaluated the impact of a simulated shift work protocol for one third, two thirds, or all of pregnancy on metabolic health of sheep progeny. Simulated shift work had no effect on growth, body size, body composition or glucose tolerance in pre-pubertal or young adult progeny. Glucose stimulated insulin secretion was reduced in adult female progeny and insulin sensitivity was increased in adult female singleton progeny. The results of this study does not support the hypothesis that maternal shift work exposure impairs metabolic health of progeny in altricial species ABSTRACT: Disrupted maternal circadian rhythms, such as those experienced during shift work, are associated with impaired progeny metabolism in rodents. The effects of disrupted maternal circadian rhythms on progeny metabolism have not been assessed in altricial, non-litter bearing species. We therefore assessed postnatal growth from birth to adulthood, and body composition, glucose tolerance, insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in pre-pubertal and young adult progeny of sheep exposed to control conditions (CON: 10 males, 10 females) or to a simulated shift work (SSW) protocol for the first 1/3 (SSW0-7: 11 males, 9 females), the first 2/3 (SSW0-14: 8 males, 11 females), or all (SSW0-21: 8 males, 13 females) of pregnancy. Progeny growth did not differ between maternal treatments. In pre-pubertal progeny (12-14 weeks of age), adiposity, glucose tolerance and insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test and insulin sensitivity did not differ between maternal treatments. Similarly, in young adult progeny (12-14 months of age), food intake, adiposity and glucose tolerance did not differ between maternal treatments. At this age, however, insulin secretion in response to a glucose bolus was 30% lower in female progeny in the combined SSW groups compared to control females (P = 0.031), and insulin sensitivity of SSW0-21 singleton females was 236% that of CON singleton female progeny (P = 0.025). At least in this model, maternal SSW does not impair progeny metabolic health, with some evidence of greater insulin action in female young adult progeny. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Basil Hetzel Research Institute for Translational Health Research, Adelaide, South Australia, 5011, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32918750 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3135
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Author Jawaad Atif, M.; Amin, B.; Imran Ghani, M.; Ali, M.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Cheng, Z.
Title Allium sativum L. (Garlic) bulb enlargement as influenced by differential combinations of photoperiod and temperature Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Food Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Food Chemistry
Volume in press Issue Pages 127991
Keywords Plants
Abstract Photoperiod and temperature are vital environmental factors that regulate plant developmental processes. However, the roles of these factors in garlic bulb enlargement are unclear. In this report, responses of garlic bulb morphology and physiology to combinations of photoperiod (light/dark: 10/14 h, 12/12 h, 14/10 h) and temperature (light/dark: 25/18°C, 30/20°C) were investigated. For garlic cultivar G103, bulb characteristics, phytohormones (IAA, ABA, ZT, tZR, JA), allicin and phenolic acids (p-coumaric and p-hydroxybenzoic) were highest under a photoperiod of 14 h at 30°C. Maximum GA was observed under 14 h+30°C for cv. G2011-5. Maximum caffeic, ferulic and vanillic acids were detected for cv. G2011-5 at 14 h+30°C, 12 h+25°C and 14 h+25°C, respectively. Flavonoids (myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin) were not detected in this trial. This is the first report describing the impact of long periods of light duration and higher temperatures on garlic morphology, phytohormones, phenolic acids and allicin content.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0308-8146 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3137
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Author Ivan, K.; Holobâcă, I.-H.; Benedek, J.; Török, I.
Title VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Income Estimation at Local Level Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 18 Pages 2950
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The aim of the paper is to develop a model for the real-time estimation of local level income data by combining machine learning, Earth Observation, and Geographic Information System. More exactly, we estimated the income per capita by help of a machine learning model for 46 cities with more than 50,000 inhabitants, based on the National Polar-orbiting Partnership–Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) nighttime satellite images from 2012–2018. For the automation of calculation, a new ModelBuilder type tool was developed within the ArcGIS software called EO-Incity (Earth Observation–Income city). The sum of light (SOL) data extracted by means of the EO-Incity tool and the observed income data were integrated in an algorithm within the MATLAB software in order to calculate a transfer equation and the average error. The results achieved were subsequently reintegrated in EO-Incity and used for the estimation of the income value at local level. The regression analyses highlighted a stable and strong relationship between SOL and income for the analyzed cities. The EO-Incity tool and the machine learning model proved to be efficient in the real-time estimation of the income at local level. When integrated in the information systems specific for smart cities, they can serve as a support for decision-making in order to fight poverty and reduce social inequalities.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3138
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Giuliani, G.; Franziskakis, F.; Tockner, K.; Lacroix, P.
Title Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining Sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Are Not Associated with Nighttime Light Emissions Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication J Abbreviated Journal J
Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 152-161
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Maintaining records of artisanal and small-scale mining sites in developing countries requires considerable effort, so it would be beneficial if Earth observation data from space could assist in the identifying and monitoring of such sites. Artificial light emissions are common at industrial-scale mining sites and have been associated with small-scale illegal mining in some contexts. Here, we examine whether known artisanal and small-scale mining sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are associated with observations of night light emissions by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB). Light emissions from the mining sites were not observed: the radiance observed from the sites was near zero and nearly identical to that observed for a set of randomly-chosen locations in the same region. While it is the case that DNB night lights’ products provide useful data in other resource extraction contexts, they do not appear to be useful for identifying artisanal mining sites in the DRC.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2571-8800 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2295
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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R.
Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191
Keywords Animals
Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752
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