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Author Entwistle, J.; Slater, D.
Title Making space for 'the social': connecting sociology and professional practices in urban lighting design1 Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication The British Journal of Sociology Abbreviated Journal Br J Sociol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Sociology; Society; Lighting
Abstract Lighting is increasingly recognized as a significant social intervention by both lighting professionals and academic social scientists. However, what counts as 'the social' is diverse and contested, with consequences for what kind of 'social' is performed or invented. Based on a long-term research programme, we argue that collaboration between sociologists and lighting professionals requires negotiating discourses and practices of 'the social'. This paper explores the quality and kinds of spaces made for 'the social' in professional practices and academic collaborations, focusing on two case studies of urban lighting that demonstrate how the space of 'the social' is constrained and impoverished by an institutionalized division between technical and aesthetic lighting. We consider the potential role of sociologists in making more productive spaces for 'the social' in urban design, as part of the central sociological task of 'inventing the social' (Marres, Guggenheim and Wilkie 2018) in the process of studying it.
Address Department of Sociology, London School of Economics
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-1315 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30864152 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2265
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Author Prayag, A.; Münch, M.; Aeschbach, D.; Chellappa, S.; Gronfier, C.
Title Light Modulation of Human Clocks, Wake, and Sleep Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 193-208
Keywords Review; Human Health
Abstract Light, through its non-imaging forming effects, plays a dominant role on a myriad of physiological functions, including the human sleep–wake cycle. The non-image forming effects of light heavily rely on specific properties such as intensity, duration, timing, pattern, and wavelengths. Here, we address how specific properties of light influence sleep and wakefulness in humans through acute effects, e.g., on alertness, and/or effects on the circadian timing system. Of critical relevance, we discuss how different characteristics of light exposure across the 24-h day can lead to changes in sleep–wake timing, sleep propensity, sleep architecture, and sleep and wake electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra. Ultimately, knowledge on how light affects sleep and wakefulness can improve light settings at home and at the workplace to improve health and well-being and optimize treatments of chronobiological disorders.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2266
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Author Yang, M.; Chen, Q.; Zhu, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Geng, Y.; Lu, C.; Wang, G.; Yang, C.-M.
Title The effects of intermittent light during the evening on sleepiness, sleep electroencephalographic spectral power and performance the next morning Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Most studies on the effects of light exposure have been conducted with continuous light. The present study investigated the effects of intermittent light exposure on sleepiness, mood, electroencephalographic activity during sleep and performance the next morning. Fifteen volunteers were scheduled to come to the sleep laboratory to experience different lighting conditions: intermittent bright light, continuous bright light and continuous dim light. Subjective sleepiness and mood were assessed during light exposure, with electroencephalographic recording during sleep. After waking the next morning, participants filled out questionnaires and went through two cognitive tasks. The results revealed significantly lower ratings of sleepiness after intermittent light exposure, which is not different from the ratings in the continuous bright light condition, and an increase in vitality during later part of the evening and more beta activity during the first 90 minutes of sleep in the intermittent light condition, in comparison with the continuous dim light condition. However, both intermittent and continuous bright light exposure showed no difference from the continuous dim light condition in subjects' mood and cognitive functioning the next morning. The data indicated intermittent light during evening decreased sleepiness, had only minimal impact on mood in the evening, increased beta electroencephalographic activity during sleep, but had no significant influence on cognitive functioning the next morning.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2267
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Author Daugaard, S.; Markvart, J.; Bonde, J.P.; Christoffersen, J.; Garde, A.H.; Hansen, A.M.; Schlunssen, V.; Vestergaard, J.M.; Vistisen, H.T.; Kolstad, H.A.
Title Light Exposure during Days with Night, Outdoor, and Indoor Work Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Annals of Work Exposures and Health Abbreviated Journal Ann Work Expo Health
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess light exposure during days with indoor, outdoor, and night work and days off work. METHODS: Light intensity was continuously recorded for 7 days across the year among indoor (n = 170), outdoor (n = 151), and night workers (n = 188) in Denmark (55-56 degrees N) equipped with a personal light recorder. White light intensity, duration above 80, 1000, and 2500 lux, and proportion of red, green, and blue light was depicted by time of the day and season for work days and days off work. RESULTS: Indoor workers' average light exposure only intermittently exceeded 1000 lux during daytime working hours in summer and never in winter. During daytime working hours, most outdoor workers exceeded 2500 lux in summer and 1000 lux in winter. Night workers spent on average 10-50 min >80 lux when working night shifts. During days off work, indoor and night workers were exposed to higher light intensities than during work days and few differences were seen between indoor, outdoor, and night workers. The spectral composition of light was similar for indoor, outdoor, and night workers during days at and off work. CONCLUSION: The night workers of this study were during night hours on average exposed for a limited time to light intensities expected to suppress melatonin. The indoor workers were exposed to light levels during daylight hours that may reduce general well-being and mood, especially in winter. Outdoor workers were during summer daylight hours exposed to light levels comparable to those used for the treatment of depression.
Address Department of Occupational Medicine, Danish Ramazinni Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, 8200 Aarhus, Denmark
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2398-7308 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30865270 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2268
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Author Musila, S.; Bogdanowicz, W.; Syingi, R.; Zuhura, A.; Chylarecki, P.; Rydell, J.
Title No lunar phobia in insectivorous bats in Kenya Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Mammalian Biology Abbreviated Journal Mammalian Biology
Volume 95 Issue Pages 77-84
Keywords Animals
Abstract We monitored foraging insectivorous bats along walked transects in forest and farmland at Arabuko-Sokoke Forest in coastal Kenya, using a heterodyne bat detector. The main purpose was to test whether aerial-hawking insectivorous bats that feed in open places (in this case mostly Scotophilus and Scotoecus spp.) show lunar phobia, i.e. restricting their activity on moonlit nights. Such behavior would be an expected response to the threat posed by visually oriented aerial predators such as bat hawks, owls and carnivorous bats. The occurrence of lunar phobia in bats is a controversial issue and may have implications for how bats will be affected by increasing light pollution. Our results show that foraging activity of the bats that we studied was related to time of day, season, and habitat, albeit with no additional effect of moonlight discernable. We therefore conclude that foraging activity occurs independently of moonlight. This result is partly at odds with previous findings including predictions from a meta-analysis of lunar phobia in bats, which indicates that lunar phobia is common in these animals, though most likely to be present in tropical species that feed in open situations near vegetation and over water. Equally, our results conform to findings from studies of aerial insectivorous bats in tropical as well as temperate areas, most of which have failed to reveal any clear evidence of lunar phobia. We believe that moonlight generally does not facilitate aerial predation on flying bats in open situations, or, alternatively, the bats accept increased predation pressure while they fulfil the energetic requirements through hunting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1616-5047 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2269
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