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Author Coulthard, E.; Norrey, J.; Shortall, C.; Harris, W.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ecological traits predict population changes in moths Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 233 Issue Pages 213-219  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Understanding the ecological traits which predispose species to local or global extinction allows for more effective pre-emptive conservation management interventions. Insect population declines are a major facet of the global biodiversity crisis, yet even in Europe they remain poorly understood. Here we identify traits linked to population trends in ‘common and widespread’ UK moths. Population trend data from the Rothamsted Research Insect Survey spanning 40 years was subject to classification and regression models to identify common traits among species experiencing a significant change in occurrence. Our final model had an accuracy of 76% and managed to predict declining species on 90% of occasions, but was less successful with increasing species. By far the most powerful predictor associated for declines was moth wingspan with large species declining more frequently. Preference for woody or herbaceous larval food sources, nocturnal photoperiod activity, and richness of habitats occupied also proved to be significantly associated with decline. Our results suggest that ecological traits can be reliably used to predict declines in moths, and that this model could be used for Data Deficient species, of which there are many.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2260  
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Author Leung, L.; Grundy, A.; Siemiatycki, J.; Arseneau, J.; Gilbert, L.; Gotlieb, W.H.; Provencher, D.M.; Aronson, K.J.; Koushik, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shift Work Patterns, Chronotype, and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Shift work causing circadian disruption is classified as a 'probable carcinogen' and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hormone-sensitive cancers. This study investigated shift work exposure in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study with 496 EOC cases and 906 controls, lifetime occupational histories were collected and used to calculate cumulative years of shift work exposure, average number of night shifts per month, and average number of consecutive night shifts per month. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with EOC risk were estimated using logistic regression. Associations were also examined according to chronotype and menopausal status. RESULTS: Over half of the cases (53.4%) and controls (51.7%) worked evening and/or night shifts. There was no clear pattern of increasing EOC risk with increasing years of shift work; the adjusted OR (95%CI) of EOC comparing the highest shift work category vs. never working shift work was 1.20 (0.89-1.63). This association was more pronounced among those self-identified as having a “morning” chronotype (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.01-2.65). Associations did not greatly differ by menopausal status. CONCLUSION: These results do not strongly demonstrate a relationship between shift work and EOC risk. IMPACT: This study collected detailed shift work information and examined shift work patterns according to shift times and schedules. The findings highlight that chronotype should be considered in studies of shift work as an exposure.  
  Address Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal anita.koushik@umontreal.ca  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30842128 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2261  
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Author Cronin, A.D.; Ryan, M.J.; Page, R.A.; Hunter, K.L.; Taylor, R.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Environmental heterogeneity alters mate choice behavior for multimodal signals Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 73 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract nimals frequently experience changes in their environment, including diel and seasonal shifts in abiotic and biotic factors. In addition to physiological and morphological changes, animals alter their behavior in response to environmental variation. This study examined the impacts of heterogeneous environments on mating behaviors. We examined both male and female túngara frog phonotactic responses to multimodal (audiovisual) and unimodal (acoustic) stimuli. We altered aspects of the physical environment by changing substrate (terrestrial and aquatic) and ambient light levels. Females demonstrated a similar preference for the audiovisual stimulus regardless of substrate but decreased latency to choose in an aquatic environment. When ambient light levels were increased (relative to darker control), females reversed their preference, avoiding the multimodal stimulus, but the latency to choose was unchanged. Males demonstrated no preference for the multimodal signal on either substrate, but like females, male latency was reduced in an aquatic environment. Different environments carry their own associated costs, including varying levels of predation risk. Increased light levels and an aquatic environment likely carry higher predation risk and therefore should lead to changes in female and male responses. Interestingly, these two environments do not cause uniform changes in female responses. The addition of an aquatic environment led to a reduction in latency, whereas an increase in ambient light levels induced a change in female mate preference. These findings demonstrate the importance of the environment on mating responses to multimodal signals.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2262  
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Author Bará, S.; Tapia, C.; Zamorano, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Absolute Radiometric Calibration of TESS-W and SQM Night Sky Brightness Sensors Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Sensors Abbreviated Journal Sensors  
  Volume 19 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Instrumentation; calibration; SQM; TESS; photometer; sky brightness  
  Abstract We develop a general optical model and describe the absolute radiometric calibration of the readings provided by two widely-used night sky brightness sensors based on irradiance-to-frequency conversion. The calibration involves the precise determination of the overall spectral sensitivity of the devices and also the constant G relating the output frequency of the light-to-frequency converter chip to the actual band-weighted and field-of-view averaged spectral radiance incident on the detector (brightness). From these parameters, we show how to define a rigorous astronomical absolute photometric system in which the sensor measurements can be reported in units of magnitudes per square arcsecond with precise physical meaning.  
  Address Departmento Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2263  
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Author Entwistle, J.; Slater, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Making space for 'the social': connecting sociology and professional practices in urban lighting design1 Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication The British Journal of Sociology Abbreviated Journal Br J Sociol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Sociology; Society; Lighting  
  Abstract Lighting is increasingly recognized as a significant social intervention by both lighting professionals and academic social scientists. However, what counts as 'the social' is diverse and contested, with consequences for what kind of 'social' is performed or invented. Based on a long-term research programme, we argue that collaboration between sociologists and lighting professionals requires negotiating discourses and practices of 'the social'. This paper explores the quality and kinds of spaces made for 'the social' in professional practices and academic collaborations, focusing on two case studies of urban lighting that demonstrate how the space of 'the social' is constrained and impoverished by an institutionalized division between technical and aesthetic lighting. We consider the potential role of sociologists in making more productive spaces for 'the social' in urban design, as part of the central sociological task of 'inventing the social' (Marres, Guggenheim and Wilkie 2018) in the process of studying it.  
  Address Department of Sociology, London School of Economics  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-1315 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30864152 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2265  
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