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Author Nang, E.E.K.; Abuduxike, G.; Posadzki, P.; Divakar, U.; Visvalingam, N.; Nazeha, N.; Dunleavy, G.; Christopoulos, G.I.; Soh, C.-K.; Jarbrink, K.; Soljak, M.; Car, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Review of the potential health effects of light and environmental exposures in underground workplaces Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages 201-209  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Underground workplaces are an important element in modern urban planning. As a result, an increasing but unquantified proportion of the population is being regularly exposed to them. We narratively reviewed the literature on the range of possible environmental exposures, and the possible health effects, to identify future research directions. There is a large but mainly observational research literature on likely underground exposures, including effects of artificial lighting, shift working and light at night on circadian disruptions and associated health effects. There are five studies comparing underground and aboveground environments. Shift working, artificial lighting and poor sleep quality leading to circadian disruption is one physiologic pathway. Working underground may increase exposure to these risks, and may also be associated with vitamin D deficiency, sick building syndrome, excessive noise, radon exposure, and negative psychological effects. In order to plan appropriate interventions, we need to expand our knowledge of the health effects of underground environments. Larger and longer-term studies are required to measure a range of human factors, environmental exposures and confounders. Controlled trials with health economic analyses of new lighting technologies are also required.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2112  
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Author Pauwels, J.; Le Viol, I.; Azam, C.; Valet, N.; Julien, J.-F.; Bas, Y.; Lemarchand, C.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kerbiriou, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Accounting for artificial light impact on bat activity for a biodiversity-friendly urban planning Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning  
  Volume 183 Issue Pages 12-25  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Light pollution constitutes a major threat to biodiversity by decreasing habitat quality and landscape connectivity for nocturnal species. While there is an increasing consideration of biodiversity in urban management policies, the impact of artificial light is poorly accounted for. This is in a large part due to the lack of quantitative information and relevant guidelines to limit its negative effects. Here we compared the potential of two sources of information on light pollution, remote sensing (nocturnal picture taken from the International Space Station ISS) and ground-based (location of streetlights) data, to measure its impact on bats. Our aims were to (i) evaluate how light pollution affected Pipistrellus pipistrellus activity at the city scale, (ii) determine which source of information was the most relevant to measure light pollution’s effect and (iii) define a reproducible methodology applicable in land management to account for biodiversity in lighting planning. We used citizen science data to model the activity of P. pipistrellus, a species considered light tolerant, within three cities of France while accounting for artificial light through a variable based on either source of information. We showed that at the city scale, P. pipistrellus activity is negatively impacted by light pollution irrespective of the light variable used. This detrimental effect was better described by variables based on ISS pictures than on streetlights location. Our methodology can be easily reproduced and used in urban planning to help take the impact of light pollution into consideration and promote a biodiversity-friendly management of artificial light.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2118  
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Author Rabstein, S.; Burek, K.; Lehnert, M.; Beine, A.; Vetter, C.; Harth, V.; Putzke, S.; Kantermann, T.; Walther, J.; Wang-Sattler, R.; Pallapies, D.; Brüning, T.; Behrens, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Differences in twenty-four-hour profiles of blue-light exposure between day and night shifts in female medical staff Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 653 Issue Pages 1025-1033  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Light is the strongest zeitgeber currently known for the synchronization of the human circadian timing system. Especially shift workers are exposed to altered daily light profiles. Our objective is the characterization of differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shift taking into consideration modifying factors such as chronotype. We describe 24-hour blue-light profiles as measured with ambient light data loggers (LightWatcher) during up to three consecutive days with either day or night shifts in 100 female hospital staff including 511 observations. Linear mixed models were applied to analyze light profiles and to select time-windows for the analysis of associations between shift work, individual factors, and log mean light exposures as well as the duration of darkness per day. Blue-light profiles reflected different daily activities and were mainly influenced by work time. Except for evening (7–9 p.m.), all time windows showed large differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shifts. Night work reduced the duration of darkness per day by almost 4 h (beta = −3:48 hh:mm, 95% CI (−4:27; −3.09)). Late chronotypes had higher light exposures in the morning and evening compared to women with intermediate chronotype (e.g. morning beta = 0.50 log(mW/m2/nm), 95% CI (0.08; 0.93)). Women with children had slightly higher light exposures in the afternoon than women without children (beta = 0.48, 95% CI (−0.10; 1,06)). Time windows for the description of light should be chosen carefully with regard to timing of shifts. Our results are helpful for future studies to capture relevant light exposure differences and potential collinearities with individual factors. Improvement of well-being of shift workers with altered light profiles may therefore require consideration of both – light at the workplace and outside working hours.  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2139  
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Author Kumar, P.; Rehman, S.; Sajjad, H.; Tripathy, B.R.; Rani, M.; Singh, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analyzing trend in artificial light pollution pattern in India using NTL sensor's data Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Urban Climate Abbreviated Journal Urban Climate  
  Volume 27 Issue Pages 272-283  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; India; DMSP; DMSP-OLS  
  Abstract Exponential growth of population and the resultant rapid rate of urbanization and industrialization in India have significantly transformed its nighttime light environment. The study makes an attempt to analyze the spatio-temporal pattern of light pollution and its causative actors in a fast-developing economy. We utilized nighttime light data from 1993 to 2013 and calibrated through linear regression. Ten patches of major changes from the whole study area were selected to assess the intensity of light pollution at regional scale. Spatial analysis of light pollution in selected patches revealed that New Delhi, Telangana, Maharashtra, Karnataka and Uttar Pradesh experienced increase in very high light pollution intensity. West Bengal, Gujarat and Tamil Nadu witnessed a remarkable change from low to high light pollution. Urban expansion, industrial development and air pollution are main drivers for increasing light pollution. Strong correlation was found between light pollution and digital numbers (DN) values at regional scale. The maps generated through Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line Scanner Night Time Light data not only helped in assessing the intensity of light pollution but also identified its causative actors.The results of study can effectively be utilized for setting priorities of environmental protection in different geographical regions at various scales.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2212-0955 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2144  
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Author Sullivan, S.M.P.; Hossler, K.; Meyer, L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial lighting at night alters aquatic-riparian invertebrate food webs Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Abbreviated Journal Ecol Appl  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages e01821  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Artificial lighting at night (ALAN) is a global phenomenon that can be detrimental to organisms at individual and population levels, yet potential consequences for communities and ecosystem functions are less resolved. Riparian systems may be particularly vulnerable to ALAN. We investigated the impacts of ALAN on invertebrate community composition and food web characteristics for linked aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems. We focused on food chain length (FCL), a central property of ecological communities that can influence their structure, function, and stability; and the contribution of aquatically derived energy (i.e., nutritional subsidies originating from stream periphyton). We collected terrestrial arthropods and emergent aquatic insects from a suite of stream and wetland sites in Columbus, Ohio, USA. Stable isotopes of carbon ((13) C) and nitrogen ((15) N) were used to infer FCL and contribution of aquatically derived energy. We found that moderate-to-high levels of ALAN altered invertebrate community composition, favoring primarily predators and detritivores. Impacts of ALAN, however, were very taxon specific as illustrated, for example, by the negative impact of ALAN on the abundance of orb-web spiders belonging to the families Tetragnathidae and Araneidae: key invertebrate riparian predators. Most notably, we observed decreases in both invertebrate FCL and reliance on aquatically derived energy under ALAN (although aquatic energetic contributions appeared to increase again at higher levels of ALAN), in addition to shifts in the timing of reciprocal nutritional subsidies. Our study demonstrates that ALAN can alter the flows of energy between aquatic and terrestrial systems, thereby representing an environmental perturbation that can cross ecosystem boundaries. Given projections for global increases in ALAN, both in terms of coverage and intensity, these results have broad implications for stream ecosystem structure and function.  
  Address Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, School of Environment & Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30566269 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2150  
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