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Author Zheng, Q.; Teo, H.C.; Koh, L.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night Advances Spring Phenology in the United States Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 399  
  Keywords Plants; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Plant phenology is closely related to light availability as diurnal and seasonal cycles are essential environmental cues for organizing bio-ecological processes. The natural cycles of light, however, have been dramatically disrupted by artificial light at night (ALAN) due to recent urbanization. The influence on plant phenology of ALAN and its spatial variation remain largely unknown. By analyzing satellite data on ALAN intensity across the United States, here, we showed that ALAN tended to advance the start date of the growing season (SOS), although the overall response of SOS to ALAN was relatively weak compared with other potential factors (e.g., preseason temperature). The phenological impact of ALAN showed a spatially divergent pattern, whereby ALAN mainly advanced SOS at climatically moderate regions within the United States (e.g., Virginia), while its effect was insignificant or even reversed at very cold (e.g., Minnesota) and hot regions (e.g., Florida). Such a divergent pattern was mainly attributable to its high sensitivity to chilling insufficiency, where the advancing effect on SOS was only triggered on the premise that chilling days exceeded a certain threshold. Other mechanisms may also play a part, such as the interplay among chilling, forcing and photoperiod and the difference in species life strategies. Besides, urban areas and natural ecosystems were found to suffer from similar magnitudes of influence from ALAN, albeit with a much higher baseline ALAN intensity in urban areas. Our findings shed new light on the phenological impact of ALAN and its relation to space and other environmental cues, which is beneficial to a better understanding and projection of phenology changes under a warming and urbanizing future.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3332  
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Author Li, J.; Cai, Y.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, Q.; Jing, Z.; Wu, Q.; Qiu, Y.; Ma, S.; Chen, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Satellite observation of a newly developed light-fishing “hotspot” in the open South China Sea Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 256 Issue Pages 112312  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Distribution patterns of lit fisheries in the South China Sea (SCS) were investigated using seasonally averaged nighttime light remote sensing data from 2016. Light-fishing activities clearly showed spatial and seasonal patterns and a newly developed “hotspot” with the presence of many intensive lights observed in the open ocean during spring. These satellite observations are consistent with seasonal changes in the fishing grounds of a Chinese large-sized, falling-net fishing fleet based on catch monitoring records for a typical commercial fishing vessel and Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS) data from this fleet. Catch monitoring records show that this type of vessel operates both on the northern shelf and in the oceanic waters, with apparent seasonal fishing patterns in the SCS. Dominant catches on the shelf include Carangids, Trichiurus japonicus, and Loligo spp., while Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis and Auxis spp. overwhelm catches in the oceanic waters. Furthermore, we compared VMS and Day Night Band (DNB) data to study fishing behaviors of this type of vessel, including match rates between VMS and nightly satellite images and the DNB radiance characteristics of the vessels. This study is valuable for delineating squid fishing grounds in the open SCS and provides an important basis for differentiating light fishing vessels of China from those of other countries, which may be useful for detecting illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing activities. Findings of this study may also shed light on mitigating the emerging threat of light pollution to the local ecosystem of the SCS.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3339  
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Author Okuliarova, M.; Mazgutova, N.; Majzunova, M.; Rumanova, V.S.; Zeman, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim Light at Night Impairs Daily Variation of Circulating Immune Cells and Renal Immune Homeostasis Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Frontiers in Immunology Abbreviated Journal Front. Immunol.  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Dim light at night (dLAN) has become a pervasive part of the modern world, and growing evidence shows its association with increased health risks. Though this link is attributed to a disturbed circadian clock, the underlying mechanisms that can explain how circadian disruption from dLAN causes negative health effects remain unclear. Here, we exposed rats to a light–dark cycle (12:12 h) with low-intensity light at night (~2 lx) for 2 and 5 weeks and explored the steady-state pattern of circulating immune cells and renal immune-related markers, which are well controlled by the circadian clock. After 5 weeks, dLAN impaired the daily variation in several types of white blood cells, especially monocytes and T cells. Two-week dLAN caused a reduction in blood monocytes and altered gene expression of macrophage marker Cd68 and monocyte-attracting chemokine Ccl2 in the kidney. Interestingly, dLAN decreased renal 3-nitrotyrosine levels and resulted in up-regulation of the main endogenous antioxidant pathways, indicating a disturbance in the renal redox balance and an activation of compensatory mechanisms. These effects paralleled the altered renal expression of the molecular clock components and increased plasma corticosterone levels. Together, our results show that chronic exposure to dLAN weakened the circadian control of daily variation of circulating immune cells and disturbed renal immune and redox homeostasis. Consequences of this dLAN-disturbed immune balance on the ability of the immune system to cope with other challenges should by clarified in further studies.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-3224 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3340  
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Author Singhal, R. K.; Chauhan, J.; Jatav, H. S.; Rajput, V. D.; Singh, G. S.; Bose, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night light alters ecosystem services provided by biotic components Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication BIOLOGIA FUTURA Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Ecology  
  Abstract The global catastrophe of natural biodiversity and ecosystem services are expedited with the growing human population. Repercussions of artificial light at night ALAN are much wider, as it varies from unicellular to higher organism. Subsequently, hastened pollution and over exploitation of natural resources accelerate the expeditious transformation of climatic phenomenon and further cause global biodiversity losses. Moreover, it has a crucial role in global biodiversity and ecosystem services losses via influencing the ecosystem biodiversity by modulating abundance, number and aggregation at every levels as from individual to biome levels. Along with these affects, it disturbs the population, genetics and landscape structures by interfering inter- and intra-species interactions and landscape formation processes. Furthermore, alterations in normal light/dark (diurnal) signalling disrupt the stable physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes and modulate the regulating, cultural and provisioning ecosystem services and ultimately disorganize the stable ecosystem structure and functions. Moreover, ALAN reshapes the abiotic component of the ecosystem, and as a key component of global warming via producing greenhouse gases via emitting light. By taking together the above facts, this review highlights the impact of ALAN on the ecosystem and its living and non-living components, emphasizing to the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. Further, we summarize the means of minimizing strategies of ALAN in the environment, which are very crucial to reduce the further spread of night light contamination in the environment and can be useful to minimize the drastic impacts on the ecosystem.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3342  
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Author Skoufias, E.; Strobl, E.; Tveit, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can we rely on VIIRS nightlights to estimate the short-term impacts of natural hazards? Evidence from five South East Asian countries Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2021 Publication Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk Abbreviated Journal Geomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 381-404  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper utilizes Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) nightlights to model damage caused by earthquakes, floods and typhoons in five South East Asian countries (Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam). For each type of hazard we examine the extent to which there is a difference in nightlight intensity between affected and non-affected cells based on (i) case studies of specific hazards; and (ii) fixed effect regression models akin to the double difference method to determine any effect that the different natural hazards might have had on the nightlight value. The VIIRS data has some shortcomings with regards to noise, seasonality and volatility that we try to correct for with new statistical methods. The results show little to no significance regardless of the methodology used. Possible explanations for the lack of significance could be underlying noise in the nightlight data and measurements or lack of measurements due to cloud cover. Overall, given the lack of consistency in the results, even though efforts were made to decrease volatility and remove noise, we conclude that researchers should be careful when analyzing natural hazard impacts with the help of VIIRS nightlights.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1947-5705 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3344  
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