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Author Boyce, P.R.
Title Review: The Impact of Light in Buildings on Human Health Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication Indoor and Built Environment Abbreviated Journal Indoor and Built Environment
Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 8-20
Keywords Human Health; indoor light; circadian disruption; shift work; oncogenesis; Review
Abstract The effects of light on health can be divided into three sections. The first is that of light as radiation. Exposure to the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation produced by light sources can damage both the eye and skin, through both thermal and photochemical mechanisms. Such damage is rare for indoor lighting installations designed for vision but can occur in some situations. The second is light operating through the visual system. Lighting enables us to see but lighting conditions that cause visual discomfort are likely to lead to eyestrain. Anyone who frequently experiences eyestrain is not enjoying the best of health. The lighting conditions that cause visual discomfort in buildings are well known and easily avoided. The third is light operating through the circadian system. This is known to influence sleep patterns and believed to be linked to the development of breast cancer among night shift workers. There is still much to learn about the impact of light on human health but what is known is enough to ensure that the topic requires the attention of all those concerned with the lighting of buildings.
Address Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York, USA
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ISSN 1420-326X ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 292
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Author Aubrecht, C.; Stojan-Dolar, M.; de Sherbinin, A.; Jaiteh, M.; Longcore, T.; Elvidge, C.
Title Lighting governance for protected areas and beyond – Identifying the urgent need for sustainable management of artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication Earthzine Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages e61460
Keywords Editorial
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 465
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Author Barghini, A.; de Medeiros, B.A.S.
Title Artificial lighting as a vector attractant and cause of disease diffusion Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect
Volume 118 Issue 11 Pages 1503-1506
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: Traditionally, epidemiologists have considered electrification to be a positive factor. In fact, electrification and plumbing are typical initiatives that represent the integration of an isolated population into modern society, ensuring the control of pathogens and promoting public health. Nonetheless, electrification is always accompanied by night lighting that attracts insect vectors and changes people's behavior. Although this may lead to new modes of infection and increased transmission of insect-borne diseases, epidemiologists rarely consider the role of night lighting in their surveys. OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the epidemiological evidence concerning the role of lighting in the spread of vector-borne diseases to encourage other researchers to consider it in future studies. DISCUSSION: We present three infectious vector-borne diseases-Chagas, leishmaniasis, and malaria-and discuss evidence that suggests that the use of artificial lighting results in behavioral changes among human populations and changes in the prevalence of vector species and in the modes of transmission. CONCLUSION: Despite a surprising lack of studies, existing evidence supports our hypothesis that artificial lighting leads to a higher risk of infection from vector-borne diseases. We believe that this is related not only to the simple attraction of traditional vectors to light sources but also to changes in the behavior of both humans and insects that result in new modes of disease transmission. Considering the ongoing expansion of night lighting in developing countries, additional research on this subject is urgently needed.
Address Laboratorio de Estudos Evolutivos Humanos, Departamento de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brasil. barghini@iee.usp.br
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:20675268; PMCID:PMC2974685 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2184
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Author Lazar, M.
Title Shedding Light on the Global Distribution of Economic Activity Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication The Open Geography Journal Abbreviated Journal Togeogj
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 147-160
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract Collection of data on economic variables, especially sub-national income levels, is problematic, due to various shortcomings in the data collection process. Additionally, the informal economy is often excluded from official statistics. Nighttime lights satellite imagery and the LandScan population grid provide an alternative means for measuring economic activity. We have developed a model for creating a disaggregated map of estimated total (formal plus informal) economic activity for countries and states of the world. Regression models were developed to calibrate the sum of lights to official measures of economic activity at the sub-national level for China, India, Mexico, and the United States and at the national level for other countries of the world, and subsequently unique coefficients were derived. Multiplying the unique coefficients with the sum of lights provided estimates of total economic activity, which were spatially distributed to generate a spatially disaggregated 1 km2 map of total economic activity.
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ISSN 1874-9232 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2440
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Author Tilottama, G., Sutton, P. C., & Elvidge, C. D.
Title Informal Economy and Remittance Estimates of India Using Nighttime Imagery Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication International Journal of Ecological Economics & Statistics Abbreviated Journal
Volume 17 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics
Abstract Accurate estimates of the magnitude and spatial distribution of both formal and informal economic activity have many useful applications. Developing alternative methods for making estimates of these economic activities may prove to be useful when other measures are of suspect accuracy or unavailable. This research explores the potential for estimating the formal and informal economy for India using known relationships between the spatial patterns of nighttime satellite imagery and economic activity in the United States (U.S.). Regression models have been developed between spatial patterns of nighttime imagery and Adjusted Official Gross State Product (AGSP) for the states of the U.S. The slope and intercept parameters derived from the regression models of the U.S. were blindly applied to India, resulting in an underestimation of Gross State Income (GSI) for each state and Union Territory (UT) of India because of the lower level of urbanization in India in comparison to the U.S. However, a comparison of estimated GSI from the nighttime lights image and the official Gross State Product (GSP) of the states and UTs of India indicates a high correlation between them (r = 0.93). The different levels of urbanization (i.e. percent of population in urban areas) in the U.S. and India are used to adjust the Estimated Gross Domestic Income (EGDI) by multiplying by the ratio of the percentage of the population in urban areas for the two countries. This gives the Adjusted Estimated Gross Domestic Income of India (AEGDI), which is compared with the official Gross National Income (GNI) estimates of India’s states and UTs. The results suggest that the magnitude of India’s informal economy and the inflow of remittances are 150 percent larger than their existing official estimates in the GNI.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2554
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