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Author Keola, S.; Andersson, M.; Hall, O.
Title Monitoring Economic Development from Space: Using Nighttime Light and Land Cover Data to Measure Economic Growth Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2015 Publication World Development Abbreviated Journal World Development
Volume 66 Issue Pages 322-334
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract This study demonstrates estimations of economic activities on global, national, and subnational levels using remote sensing data, with a focus on developing economies. It extends a recent statistical framework which uses nighttime lights to estimate official income growth by accounting for agriculture and forestry which emit less or no additional observable nighttime light. The study argues that nighttime lights alone may not explain value-added by agriculture and forestry. By adding land cover data, our framework can be used to estimate economic growth in administrative areas of virtually any size.
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ISSN 0305750X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2476
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Author Todd, J.J.; Barakat, B.; Tavassoli, A.; Krauss, D.A.
Title The Moon’s Contribution to Nighttime Illuminance in Different Environments Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2015 Publication Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Abbreviated Journal Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting
Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 1056-1060
Keywords Moonlight
Abstract The moon’s contribution to illuminance was investigated in order to determine the role it may play in providing a level of illuminance suitable to perform everyday tasks in nighttime outdoor environments. The level of illuminance provided in an area void of artificial lighting was compared to illuminance in an urban environment. Moon phase affected illuminance only in the absence of urban lighting. This effect was lost when controlling for altitude and azimuth, suggesting the moon’s location in the sky has a more significant effect on illuminance than the phase of the moon. These results are discussed in relation to our current understanding and experience of navigating and operating in nighttime environments.
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ISSN 1541-9312 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2666
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Author Żagan, W.
Title Opinion: Obtrusive light and floodlighting Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2015 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 640-640
Keywords Commentary
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2713
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Author Doleac, J.L.; Sanders, N.J.
Title Under the Cover of Darkness: How Ambient Light Influences Criminal Activity Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2015 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal Review of Economics and Statistics
Volume 97 Issue 5 Pages 1093-1103
Keywords Public Safety; Crime
Abstract We exploit daylight saving time (DST) as an exogenous shock to daylight, using both the discontinuous nature of the policy and the 2007 extension of DST, to consider the impact of light on criminal activity.Regression discontinuity estimates show a 7% decrease in robberies following the shift to DST. As expected, effects are largest during the hours directly affected by the shift in daylight. We discuss our findings within the context of criminal decision making and labor supply, and estimate that the2007 DST extension resulted in $59 million in annual social cost savings from avoided robberies.
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ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2836
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Author Marimuthu C.; Kirubakaran V.
Title Carbon and Energy Pay Back Period for the Solar Street Light using Life Cycle Assessment Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2015 Publication International Journal of ChemTech Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages 1125-1130
Keywords Lighting; Economics
Abstract Electronic street lights are big consumers of energy, costing millions to cities and municipalities around the world. Solar Street light is one of the method to reduce the power consumption by generate the energy using the solar Photovoltaic panel. This system includes the power generators (panel), storage (batteries) and management (controller) as well as the light, poles and weather proof housing for batteries. Life cycle inventories are based on manufacturers data combined with additional calculation and assumption. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology used in this research was based on the ISO 14040 and 14044 series. In this paper, the LCA method is used to investigate the environmental impacts of two types of street light technology, conventional street light and solar street light. The cradle to grave analysis for conventional and solar street light includes raw material extraction, production, uses and end of life scenario. The detail investigation has made for the existing solar street light present at Gandhigram Rural University, Dindigul Dist, Tamil Nadu. The specification of the solar street light is 80W capacity, 1.2 m2 area of panel and 135Ah – 12V battery. The total no of poles is 70. For the above system carbon intensity, Energy Pay Back Period and Carbon Pay Back Period have been calculated and compared with conventional street light. The result from the study will support local decision makers when seeking a balance between the environmental, financial and social requirements of public lighting services.
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ISSN 0974-4290 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3147
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