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Author (up) Kraneburg, A.; Franke, S.; Methling, R.; Griefahn, B.
Title Effect of color temperature on melatonin production for illumination of working environments Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Applied Ergonomics
Volume 58 Issue Pages 446-453
Keywords Human Health
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ISSN 0003-6870 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1510
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Author (up) Regente, J.; de Zeeuw, J.; Bes, F.; Nowozin, C.; Appelhoff, S.; Wahnschaffe, A.; Münch, M.; Kunz, D.
Title Can short-wavelength depleted bright light during single simulated night shifts prevent circadian phase shifts? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Applied Ergonomics
Volume 61 Issue Pages 22-30
Keywords Human Health
Abstract In single night shifts, extending habitual wake episodes leads to sleep deprivation induced decrements of performance during the shift and re-adaptation effects the next day. We investigated whether short-wavelength depleted (=filtered) bright light (FBL) during a simulated night shift would counteract such effects. Twenty-four participants underwent a simulated night shift in dim light (DL) and in FBL. Reaction times, subjective sleepiness and salivary melatonin concentrations were assessed during both nights. Daytime sleep was recorded after both simulated night shifts. During FBL, we found no melatonin suppression compared to DL, but slightly faster reaction times in the second half of the night. Daytime sleep was not statistically different between both lighting conditions (n = 24) and there was no significant phase shift after FBL (n = 11). To conclude, our results showed positive effects from FBL during simulated single night shifts which need to be further tested with larger groups, in more applied studies and compared to standard lighting.
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ISSN 0003-6870 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1622
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Author (up) Wood, B.; Rea, M.S.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.G.
Title Light level and duration of exposure determine the impact of self-luminous tablets on melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Appl Ergon
Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 237-240
Keywords Adolescent; *Computers, Handheld; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/*biosynthesis; Photoperiod; Saliva/*metabolism; Sleep/radiation effects; Time Factors; Young Adult; melatonin
Abstract Exposure to light from self-luminous displays may be linked to increased risk for sleep disorders because these devices emit optical radiation at short wavelengths, close to the peak sensitivity of melatonin suppression. Thirteen participants experienced three experimental conditions in a within-subjects design to investigate the impact of self-luminous tablet displays on nocturnal melatonin suppression: 1) tablets-only set to the highest brightness, 2) tablets viewed through clear-lens goggles equipped with blue light-emitting diodes that provided 40 lux of 470-nm light at the cornea, and 3) tablets viewed through orange-tinted glasses (dark control; optical radiation <525 nm approximately 0). Melatonin suppressions after 1-h and 2-h exposures to tablets viewed with the blue light were significantly greater than zero. Suppression levels after 1-h exposure to the tablets-only were not statistically different than zero; however, this difference reached significance after 2 h. Based on these results, display manufacturers can determine how their products will affect melatonin levels and use model predictions to tune the spectral power distribution of self-luminous devices to increase or to decrease stimulation to the circadian system.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA. woodb5@rpi.edu
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Notes PMID:22850476 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 136
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