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Author (up) Emmer, K.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Walker, W.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light at night on laboratory animals and research outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 302-314  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light has substantial influences on the physiology and behavior of most laboratory animals. As such, lighting conditions within animal rooms are potentially significant and often underappreciated variables within experiments. Disruption of the light/dark cycle, primarily by exposing animals to light at night (LAN), disturbs biological rhythms and has widespread physiological consequences because of mechanisms such as melatonin suppression, sympathetic stimulation, and altered circadian clock gene expression. Thus, attention to the lighting environment of laboratory animals and maintaining consistency of a light/dark cycle is imperative for study reproducibility. Light intensity, as well as wavelength, photoperiod, and timing, are all important variables. Although modern rodent facilities are designed to facilitate appropriate light cycling, there are simple ways to modify rooms to prevent extraneous light exposure during the dark period. Attention to lighting conditions of laboratory animals by both researchers and research care staff ensures best practices for maintaining animal welfare, as well as reproducibility of research results. (PsycINFO Database Record  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952608 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1957  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Landgraf, D.; McCarthy, M.J.; Welsh, D.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of the circadian clock in animal models of mood disorders Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 128 Issue 3 Pages 344-359  
  Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; mood; mood disorders; circadian disruption  
  Abstract An association between circadian clock function and mood regulation is well established and has been proposed as a factor in the development of mood disorders. Patients with depression or mania suffer disturbed sleep-wake cycles and altered rhythms in daily activities. Environmentally disrupted circadian rhythms increase the risk of mood disorders in the general population. However, proof that a disturbance of circadian rhythms is causally involved in the development of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Using clock gene mutants, manipulations of sleep-wake and light-dark cycles, and brain lesions affecting clock function, animal models have been developed to investigate whether circadian rhythm disruptions alter mood. In this review, selected animal models are examined to address the issue of causality between circadian rhythms and affective behavior.  
  Address Research Service, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24660657 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 316  
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Author (up) Zhou, Y.; Zhang, H.-K.; Liu, F.; Lei, G.; Liu, P.; Jiao, T.; Dang, Y.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Altered Light Conditions Contribute to Abnormalities in Emotion and Cognition Through HINT1 Dysfunction in C57BL/6 Mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 110  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract In recent years, the environmental impact of artificial light at night has been a rapidly growing global problem, affecting 99% of the population in the US and Europe, and 62% of the world population. The present study utilized a mouse model exposed to long-term artificial light and light deprivation to explore the impact of these conditions on emotion and cognition. Based on the potential links between histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) and mood disorders, we also examined the expression of HINT1 and related apoptosis factors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus (Hip). Mice exposed to constant light (CL) exhibited depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, as well as impaired spatial memory, as demonstrated by an increased immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests, less entries and time spent in the open arms of elevated plus-maze, and less platform site crossings and time spent in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze (MWM). The effects of constant darkness (CD) partially coincided with long-term illumination, except that mice in the CD group failed to show anxiety-like behaviors. Furthermore, HINT1 was upregulated in four encephalic regions, indicating that HINT1 may be involved in mood disorders and cognitive impairments due to altered light exposure. The apoptosis-related proteins, BAX and BCL-2, showed the opposite expression pattern, reflecting an activated apoptotic pathway. These findings suggest that exposure to CL and/or darkness can induce significant changes in affective and cognitive responses, possibly through HINT1-induced activation of apoptotic pathways.  
  Address College of Medicine & Forensics, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi'an, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-5153 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29937721; PMCID:PMC6002487 Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2094  
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