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Author Raap, T.; Sun, J.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M.
Title Disruptive effects of light pollution on sleep in free-living birds: Season and/or light intensity-dependent? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes
Volume 144 Issue Pages 13-19
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing anthropogenic environmental pollutant posing an important potential threat for wildlife. Evidence of its effects on animal physiology and behaviour is accumulating. However, in order to effectively mitigate light pollution it is important to determine which factors contribute to the severity of effects of ALAN. In this experimental study we explored whether there are seasonal-dependent effects of ALAN on sleep in free-living great tits (Parus major), an important model species. Additionally, we looked at whether light intensity determined the severity of effects of ALAN on sleep. We therefore exposed animals to artificial light inside the nest box (3lx) in December (winter) and February (pre-breeding season). Results from February were compared with the results from a previous study in February, using a lower light intensity (1.6lx). We found little evidence for a season-dependent response. Effects of ALAN hardly differed between high and low light intensity. ALAN disrupted sleep with as main effect a decrease in sleep duration ( approximately -40min) as animals woke up earlier ( approximately -24min). However, compared to a natural dark situation sleep onset was delayed by high but not by low light intensity of ALAN. Our study underlines earlier found disruptive effects of ALAN on sleep of free-living animals. While we found no conclusive evidence for seasonal or light intensity-dependent effects of ALAN, additional experimental work using lower light intensities might show such differences. Examining potential management options is crucial in mitigating disruptive effects of light pollution, which will be an important focus for future studies.
Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
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ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28855103 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1705
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Author Lopes, A.C.C.; Villacorta-Correa, M.A.; Carvalho, T.B.
Title Lower light intensity reduces larval aggression in matrinxã, Brycon amazonicus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behavioural Processes
Volume 151 Issue Pages 62-66
Keywords Animals
Abstract Brycon amazonicus shows a high frequency of aggressive behavior, which can be a limiting factor in intensive farming systems. Environmental changes can modulate the social interactions of fish and reduce aggression during the different stages of production. Groups of three larvae at 12 h after hatching (HAH) were subjected to different levels of light intensity: low (17 ± 3 lx), intermediate (204 ± 12.17 lx) and high (1,613.33 ± 499.03 lx), with eight replicates for each level. The lower light intensity reduced the frequency of aggressive interactions and locomotor activity exhibited by the animals. Based on these results, light intensity modulates aggression in B. amazonicus larvae. Manipulation of this factor could improve the social conditions of this species during farming and contribute to the development of new production technologies.
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Language Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1810
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Author Stafstrom, J.A.; Hebets, E.A.
Title Male attraction to female airborne cues by the net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes
Volume 159 Issue Pages 23-30
Keywords Animals
Abstract For many animals, finding a mate can be a difficult task. For males, it often involves actively searching for conspecific females, sometimes over great distances. This mate-searching can be aided through chemical or visual signals or cues produced by sexually receptive females. Here, we investigate the roles of olfaction and vision in mate-searching in a strictly nocturnal net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa. First, we used an olfactometer assay to determine if mature male D. spinosa respond to conspecific airborne cues. We found that mature males, but not mature females, were attracted to airborne cues of mature female conspecifics. We next investigated the relative importance of olfaction and vision in male mate-searching. While manipulating airflow and light levels in screened enclosures in the laboratory, we tested freely moving mature males for mate-searching success. We found no effect of our airflow treatment on mate-searching success. Light levels, however, affected mate-searching in an unexpected way – males were more likely to locate females in complete darkness when compared to dim-light conditions. Our results suggest that visual cues are not necessary for successful male mate-searching in D. spinosa, but that the visual environment can nonetheless influence male behavior. In summary, we provide evidence suggesting that airborne cues, but not visual cues, are important in D. spinosa male mate-searching efforts, though the source of these chemical airborne cues remains unknown.
Address University of Nebraska – Lincoln, School of Biological Sciences, NE, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30562562 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2152
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Author Deng, K.; Zhu, B.-C.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, Q.-H.; Wang, T.-L.; Wang, J.-C.; Cui, J.-G.
Title Mate choice decisions of female serrate-legged small treefrogs are affected by ambient light under natural, but not enhanced artificial nocturnal light conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behavioural Processes
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread anthropogenic stimulus that can significantly alter nocturnal animals’ behavior, from migration to foraging to vocal communication. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the mate choice decisions of female serrate-legged small treefrogs (Kurixalus odontotarsus) were influenced by ambient light intensity. Standard two-speaker phonotaxis tests were conducted in a sound attenuating chamber. We set four light conditions (I-IV, from low to high) based on a range of light intensities from the maximum natural light at night (i.e., full moon) to that of the actual calling sites, which had artificial light. Contrary to our prediction, female frogs showed a preference for calls on the bright side in treatment I when they were exposed to identical stimuli. However, females preferred longer calls on the dim side to shorter calls on the bright side in this treatment. In addition, there were no significant effects of choice side, light treatment or their interaction on leave time or choice time. Our results suggest that females are more attracted to mates in bright light under natural nocturnal light conditions, but the preference for longer calls is not altered in serrate-legged small treefrogs.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title (up)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2730
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