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Author (up) Morelli, F.; Benedetti, Y.; Moravec, D.; Jerzak, L.; Tryjanowski, P.; Liang, W.; Møller, A.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global congruence between cuckoo species richness and biodiversity hotspots Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 232 Issue Pages 28-34  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Considering loss of biodiversity a global threat, cost-effective tools for monitoring spatial distribution of species are relevant for conservation planning. The aims of this study were (a) to compare the global pattern of species richness in Cuculidae with species richness of birds, amphibians and mammals; (b) whether it is spatially congruent with hotspot areas of biodiversity at a global scale; and (c) whether the distribution of night light intensity reflecting human population density is associated with cuckoo species richness. We mapped the global distribution of all cuckoo species, classified as parasitic or non-parasitic species. Species richness was calculated at a fixed spatial scale for: Cuculidae, amphibians, birds and mammals. We applied Generalized Linear Mixed Models in order to explore the associations between species richness of each group of animals, night light intensity and hotspots of biodiversity areas at a global scale.

Worldwide patterns of species richness of parasitic and non-parasitic cuckoos reflected species richness of birds, amphibians and mammals. In addition, and importantly, species richness of cuckoos was spatially congruent with hotspot areas of biodiversity across the world. Finally, night light intensity was slightly positively associated with species richness of parasitic cuckoos. Our findings confirmed that cuckoos constitute an important surrogate of high species richness of different animal taxa at a global scale: It is easy to learn how to identify cuckoos, whereas other species of birds, mammals or amphibians can only be identified by specialists. Our findings also suggest that other parasitic cuckoo species can be used as a biodiversity surrogate in a similar way as the common cuckoo in Eurasia.
 
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  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2207  
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Author (up) Owens, A. C. S., Cochard, P., Durrant, J., Farnworth, B., Perkin, E. K., &Seymoure, B. url  openurl
  Title Light Pollution Is a Driver of Insect Declines Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 108259  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Insects around the world are rapidly declining. Concerns over what this loss means for food security and ecological communities have compelled a growing number of researchers to search for the key drivers behind the decline. Habitat loss, pesticide use, invasive species, and climate change all have likely played a role, but we posit here that artificial light at night (ALAN) is another important — but often overlooked — bringer of the insect apocalypse. We first discuss the history and extent of ALAN, and then present evidence that ALAN has led to insect declines through its interference with the development, movement, foraging, and reproductive success of diverse insect species, as well as its positive effect on insectivore predation. We conclude with a discussion of how artificial lights can be tuned to reduce their impacts on vulnerable populations. ALAN is unique among anthropogenic habitat disturbances in that it is fairly easy to ameliorate, and leaves behind no residual effects. Greater recognition of the ways in which ALAN impacts insects can help conservationists reduce or eliminate one of the major drivers of insect declines.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2649  
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Author (up) Rebke, M.; Dierschke, V.; Weiner, C.N.; Aumüller, R.; Hill, K.; Hill, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Attraction of nocturnally migrating birds to artificial light: The influence of colour, intensity and blinking mode under different cloud cover conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 233 Issue Pages 220-227  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A growing number of offshore wind farms have led to a tremendous increase in artificial lighting in the marine environment. This study disentangles the connection of light characteristics, which potentially influence the reaction of nocturnally migrating passerines to artificial illumination under different cloud cover conditions. In a spotlight experiment on a North Sea island, birds were exposed to combinations of light colour (red, yellow, green, blue, white), intensity (half, full) and blinking mode (intermittent, continuous) while measuring their number close to the light source with thermal imaging cameras.

We found that no light variant was constantly avoided by nocturnally migrating passerines crossing the sea. The number of birds did neither differ between observation periods with blinking light of different colours nor compared to darkness. While intensity did not influence the number attracted, birds were drawn more towards continuous than towards blinking illumination, when stars were not visible. Red continuous light was the only exception that did not differ from the blinking counterpart. Continuous green, blue and white light attracted significantly more birds than continuous red light in overcast situations.

Our results suggest that light sources offshore should be restricted to a minimum, but if lighting is needed, blinking light is to be preferred over continuous light, and if continuous light is required, red light should be applied.
 
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  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2255  
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Author (up) Riley, W. D.; Davison, P. I.; Maxwell, D. L.; Bendall, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Street lighting delays and disrupts the dispersal of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 158 Issue Pages 140-146  
  Keywords animals; fish; animal behaviour  
  Abstract There has been a decline in the abundance of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) despite significant conservation measures designed to reduce fishing mortality. Populations at the southern edge of their historical distribution, where anthropogenic impacts on the freshwater environment may be greater, have suffered the largest decline. In this investigation, we compared the timing of Atlantic salmon fry dispersal from incubators in an aquarium under control and ecologically relevant broad spectrum street-lit conditions (median night light intensity = 12 lx). Fry dispersal occurred 2.8 days later (F = 82.9, df = 1,8, p < 0.001), and on average the fry were smaller at dispersal (0.017 g, se = 0.0012, p < 0.001, n = 730), in the incubators exposed to street lighting. Significant disruption to the diel pattern of fry dispersal was also observed. Dispersal under control conditions was significantly directed around a mean time of 4:17 h after dusk (p < 0.001, r = 0.76, n = 1990) with very few fry (<2%) dispersing during daylight hours. Under street lighting, the dispersal of fry was significantly delayed (mean time 6:38 h after dusk; p < 0.001, r = 0.39, n = 2413) with a significant proportion (32%) dispersing during daylight hours. Survival to dispersal in the controlled aquarium conditions was not lower under street-lit conditions (p = 0.21, n = 5000 eggs across 10 incubators). However, in the wild, the period between fry emergence and the establishment of feeding territories is considered to be of critical importance in the dynamics of salmonid populations and any disruption may reduce fitness.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1599  
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Author (up) Tuxbury, S.M.; Salmon, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Competitive interactions between artificial lighting and natural cues during seafinding by hatchling marine turtles Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 121 Issue 2 Pages 311-316  
  Keywords Sea turtle; Orientation; Photopollution; Habitat restoration; animals; reptiles; marine turtles; conservation  
  Abstract Artificial lighting disrupts the nocturnal orientation of sea turtle hatchlings as they crawl from their nest to the ocean. Laboratory experiments in an arena were used to simultaneously present artificial light (that attracted the turtles toward “land”) and natural cues (a dark silhouette of the dune behind the beach) that promoted “seaward” orientation. Artificial lighting disrupted seaward crawling in the presence of low silhouettes, but not high silhouettes. Low silhouettes provided adequate cues for seaward crawling when the apparent brightness of artificial light was reduced. Based upon these results, we postulate that artificial light disrupts orientation by competing with natural cues. Current restoration practices at nesting beaches emphasize light reduction. However at many sites some lights cannot be modified. Our results suggest that pairing dune restoration (to enhance natural cues) with light reduction (to the extent possible) should significantly improve hatchling orientation, even at nesting beaches where lighting cannot be entirely eliminated.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 79  
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