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Author Guetté, A.; Godet, L.; Juigner, M.; Robin, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Worldwide increase in Artificial Light At Night around protected areas and within biodiversity hotspots Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 223 Issue Pages 97-103  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Conservation  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) has several adverse impacts on biodiversity, and it has been recently used as a proxy to monitor human encroachment on landscapes at large spatial scales. The extent to which ALAN affects protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity hotspots (BHs) remains however untested at large spatial scales. We used this proxy to assess the spatial and temporal trends in the anthropization at a global scale within and around PAs and BHs. We found that ALAN is low and stable over time within PAs, but is the highest in a first outer belt (<25 km) around PAs, and tends to increase in a second outer belt (25–75 km). In the meantime, ALAN is higher within BHs than outside, and is even the highest and increasing over time in an inner belt, close to their periphery. Our results suggest that although PAs are creating safety zones in terms of ALAN, they tend to be more and more isolated from each other by a concentric human encroachment. In contrast, BHs are submitted to an increasing human pressure, especially in their inner periphery. Overall, we suggest integrating ALAN in large-scale conservation policies.  
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  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1890  
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Author Lao, S.; Robertson, B.A.; Anderson, A.W.; Blair, R.B.; Eckles, J.W.; Turner, R.J.; Loss, S.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) The influence of artificial night at night and polarized light on bird-building collisions Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 241 Issue Pages 108358  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Collisions with buildings annually kill up to 1 billion birds in the United States. Bird-building collisions primarily occur at glass surfaces: birds often fail to perceive glass as a barrier and appear to be attracted to artificial light emitted from windows. However, some aspects of avian vision are poorly understood, including how bird responses to different types of light influence building collisions. Some evidence suggests birds can detect polarized light, which may serve as a cue to assist with migration orientation and/or detect water bodies. Dark, reflective surfaces, including glass, reflect high degrees of polarized light, causing polarized light pollution (PLP). However, no studies have analyzed the relationship between bird collisions and PLP reflected from buildings. Additionally, while artificial light at night (ALAN) is frequently implicated as a major factor influencing bird-building collisions, few studies have analyzed this relationship. We investigated both types of light pollution—PLP and ALAN—and their association with bird collisions at 48 façades of 13 buildings in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. We found that the area of glass emitting ALAN was the most important factor influencing collisions, and that this effect of ALAN was independent of overall glass area; this result provides strong support for turning off lights at night to reduce bird-building collisions. Although we found no relationship between PLP and collisions, additional research is needed to better understand bird responses to polarized light. Fully understanding how different aspects of light influence bird-building collisions can inform conservation efforts to reduce this major threat to birds.  
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  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2757  
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Author Downs, N C; Beaton, V; Guest, J; Polanski, J.; Robinson, S L.; Racey, P A url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) The effects of illuminating the roost entrance on the emergence behaviour of Pipistrellus pygmaeus Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 111 Issue 2 Pages 247.252  
  Keywords animals; flying mammals; animal behavior; light colour  
  Abstract In an attempt to increase the accuracy of roost emergence counts for a monitoring programme, the exits of two Pipistrellus pygmaeus roosts were illuminated with light of different colours and intensities. Light intensity affected bat emergence more than light colour. At one roost there was no significant difference in the bat emergence pattern between when the roost exit received no illumination and when it was illuminated with red light. The use of the latter is proposed to increase the accuracy of bat roost emergence counts.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1587  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bliss-Ketchum, L.L.; de Rivera, C.E.; Turner, B.C.; Weisbaum, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) The effect of artificial light on wildlife use of a passage structure Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 199 Issue Pages 25-28  
  Keywords Animals; animal movement; Columbia black-tailed deer; deer; Odocoileus hemionus columbianus; deer mouse; Peromyscus maniculatus; opossum; Didelphis virginiana; artificial light at night  
  Abstract Barriers to animal movement can isolate populations, impacting their genetic diversity, susceptibility to disease, and access to resources. Barriers to movement may be caused by artificial light, which is known to disrupt bird, sea turtle, and bat behavior, but few studies have experimentally investigated the effects of artificial light on movement for a suite of terrestrial vertebrates. Therefore, we studied the effect of ecological light pollution on animal usage of a bridge under-road passage structure. On a weekly basis, sections of the structure were subjected to different light treatments including no light added, followed by a Reference period when lights were off in all the structure sections. Sand track data revealed use by 23 mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians, nine of which had > 30 tracks for species-level analysis. Columbia black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) traversed under unlit bridge sections much less when neighboring sections were lit compared to when none were, suggesting avoidance due to any nearby presence of artificial light. Similarly, deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and opossum (Didelphis virginiana) track paths were less frequent in the lit sections than the ambient. Crossing was correlated with temporal or spatial factors but not light for three of the other species. These findings suggest that artificial light may be reducing habitat connectivity for some species though not providing a strong barrier for others. Such information is needed to inform mitigation of habitat fragmentation in the face of expanding urbanization.  
  Address Department of Environmental Science & Management, Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207, USA; blissket(at)pdx.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1445  
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Author Riley, W. D.; Davison, P. I.; Maxwell, D. L.; Bendall, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Street lighting delays and disrupts the dispersal of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Biological conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 158 Issue Pages 140-146  
  Keywords animals; fish; animal behaviour  
  Abstract There has been a decline in the abundance of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) despite significant conservation measures designed to reduce fishing mortality. Populations at the southern edge of their historical distribution, where anthropogenic impacts on the freshwater environment may be greater, have suffered the largest decline. In this investigation, we compared the timing of Atlantic salmon fry dispersal from incubators in an aquarium under control and ecologically relevant broad spectrum street-lit conditions (median night light intensity = 12 lx). Fry dispersal occurred 2.8 days later (F = 82.9, df = 1,8, p < 0.001), and on average the fry were smaller at dispersal (0.017 g, se = 0.0012, p < 0.001, n = 730), in the incubators exposed to street lighting. Significant disruption to the diel pattern of fry dispersal was also observed. Dispersal under control conditions was significantly directed around a mean time of 4:17 h after dusk (p < 0.001, r = 0.76, n = 1990) with very few fry (<2%) dispersing during daylight hours. Under street lighting, the dispersal of fry was significantly delayed (mean time 6:38 h after dusk; p < 0.001, r = 0.39, n = 2413) with a significant proportion (32%) dispersing during daylight hours. Survival to dispersal in the controlled aquarium conditions was not lower under street-lit conditions (p = 0.21, n = 5000 eggs across 10 incubators). However, in the wild, the period between fry emergence and the establishment of feeding territories is considered to be of critical importance in the dynamics of salmonid populations and any disruption may reduce fitness.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1599  
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