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Author (up) Agbaria, S.; Haim, A.; Fares, F.; Zubidat, A.E.
Title Epigenetic modification in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model by artificial light at night and melatonin – the role of DNA-methyltransferase Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 36 Issue 5 Pages 629-643
Keywords Animals
Abstract Currently, one of the most disputed hypotheses regarding breast cancer (BC) development is exposure to short wavelength artificial light at night (ALAN) as multiple studies suggest a possible link between them. This link is suggested to be mediated by nocturnal melatonin suppression that plays an integral role in circadian regulations including cell division. The objective of the research was to evaluate effects of 1 x 30 min/midnight ALAN (134 micro Wcm(-2), 460 nm) with or without nocturnal melatonin supplement on tumor development and epigenetic responses in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Mice were monitored for body mass (Wb) and tumor volume for 3 weeks and thereafter urine samples were collected at regular intervals for determining daily rhythms of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SMT). Finally, mice were sacrificed and the tumor, lungs, liver, and spleen were excised for analyzing the total activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and global DNA methylation (GDM) levels. Mice exposed to ALAN significantly reduced 6-SMT levels and increased Wb, tumor volume, and lung metastasis compared with controls. These effects were diminished by melatonin. The DNMT activity and GDM levels showed tissue-specific response. The enzymatic activity and GDM levels were lower in tumor and liver and higher in spleen and lungs under ALAN compared with controls. Our results suggest that ALAN disrupts the melatonin rhythm and potentially leading to increased BC burden by affecting DNMT activity and GDM levels. These data may also be applicable to early detection and management of BC by monitoring melatonin and GDM levels as early biomarker of ALAN circadian disruption.
Address b The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology , University of Haifa, Haifa , Israel; Zubidat3(at)013.net.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30746962 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2211
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Author (up) Arendt, J.
Title Biological rhythms during residence in polar regions Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 379-394
Keywords *Acclimatization; Activities of Daily Living; Affect; Antarctic Regions; Arctic Regions; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; *Cold Climate; *Cold Temperature; Energy Metabolism; Feeding Behavior; Humans; Melatonin/metabolism; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling; *Photoperiod; Seasonal Affective Disorder/physiopathology/prevention & control/psychology; *Seasons; Sleep; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology/physiopathology/*prevention & control/psychology; Time Factors; Workload; Workplace
Abstract At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 x 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with “normal” working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75 degrees S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within a week, in contrast to temperate zones where complete adaptation rarely occurs. A similar situation occurs on high-latitude North Sea oil installations, especially when working 18:00-06:00 h. Lack of conflicting light exposure (and “social obligations”) is the probable explanation. Many have problems returning to day work, showing circadian desynchrony. Timed light treatment again has helped to restore normal phase/sleep in a small number of people. Postprandial response to meals is compromised during periods of desynchrony with evidence of insulin resistance and elevated triglycerides, risk factors for heart disease. Only small numbers of subjects have been studied intensively in polar regions; however, these observations suggest that suboptimal light conditions are deleterious to health. They apply equally to people living in temperate zones with insufficient light exposure.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK. arendtjo@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22497433; PMCID:PMC3793275 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 143
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Author (up) Asher, A.; Shabtay, A.; Brosh, A.; Eitam, H.; Agmon, R.; Cohen-Zinder, M.; Zubidat, A.E.; Haim, A.
Title “Chrono-functional milk”: The difference between melatonin concentrations in night-milk versus day-milk under different night illumination conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 32 Issue 10 Pages 1409-1416
Keywords Animals; Heart rate; illumination; melatonin; night-milk; chronobiology
Abstract Pineal melatonin (MLT) is produced at highest levels during the night, under dark conditions. We evaluated differences in MLT-concentration by comparing daytime versus night time milk samples, from two dairy farms with different night illumination conditions: (1) natural dark (Dark-Night); (2) short wavelength Artificial Light at Night (ALAN, Night-Illuminated). Samples were collected from 14 Israeli Holstein cows from each commercial dairy farm at 04:30 h (“Night-milk”) 12:30 h (“Day-milk”) and analyzed for MLT-concentration. In order to study the effects of night illumination conditions on cows circadian rhythms, Heart Rate (HR) daily rhythms were recorded. MLT-concentrations of Night-milk samples from the dark-night group were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than those of Night-illuminated conditions (30.70 +/- 1.79 and 17.81 +/- 0.33 pg/ml, respectively). Interestingly, night illumination conditions also affected melatonin concentrations at daytime where under Dark-Night conditions values are significantly (p < 0.001) higher than Night-Illuminated conditions, (5.36 +/- 0.33 and 3.30 +/- 0.18 pg/ml, respectively). There were no significant differences between the two treatments in the milk yield and milk composition except somatic cell count (SCC), which was significantly lower (p = 0.02) in the Dark-Night group compared with the Night-Illuminated group. Cows in both groups presented a significant (p < 0.01) HR daily rhythm, therefore we assume that in the night illuminated cows feeding and milking time are the “time keeper”, while in the Dark-night cows, HR rhythms were entrained by the light/dark cycle. The higher MLT-concentration in Dark-night cows with the lower SCC values calls upon farmers to avoid exposure of cows to ALAN. Therefore, under Dark-night conditions milk quality will improve by lowering SCC values where separation between night and day of such milk can produce chrono-functional milk, naturally rich with MLT.
Address b Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology , Faculty of Natural Sciences, The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa , Mount Carmel , Haifa , Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26588495 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1312
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Author (up) Ayaki, M.; Hattori, A.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakano, M.; Yoshimura, M.; Kitazawa, M.; Negishi, K.; Tsubota, K.
Title Protective effect of blue-light shield eyewear for adults against light pollution from self-luminous devices used at night Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 134-139
Keywords Human health
Abstract We investigated sleep quality and melatonin in 12 adults who wore blue-light shield or control eyewear 2 hours before sleep while using a self-luminous portable device, and assessed visual quality for the two eyewear types. Overnight melatonin secretion was significantly higher after using the blue-light shield (P < 0.05) than with the control eyewear. Sleep efficacy and sleep latency were significantly superior for wearers of the blue-light shield (P < 0.05 for both), and this group reported greater sleepiness during portable device use compared to those using the control eyewear. Participants rated the blue-light shield as providing acceptable visual quality.
Address a Department of Ophthalmology , Keio University School of Medicine , Shinjuku , Tokyo , Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26730983 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1330
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Author (up) Bagci, S.; Sabir, H.; Muller, A.; Reiter, R.J.
Title Effects of altered photoperiod due to COVID-19 lockdown on pregnant women and their fetuses Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Human Health; Covid-19; circadian disruption; fetus; lockdown; melatonin; pregnant Women
Abstract Maternal circadian rhythms provide highly important input into the entrainment and programming of fetal and newborn circadian rhythms. The light-dark cycle is an important regulator of the internal biological clock. Even though pregnant women spend a greater part of the day at home during the latter stages of pregnancy, natural light exposure is crucial for the fetus. The current recommended COVID-19 lockdown might dramatically alter normal environmental lighting conditions of pregnant women, resulting in exposure to extremely low levels of natural daylight and high-intensity artificial light sources during both day and night. This article summarizes the potential effects on pregnant woman and their fetuses due to prolonged exposure to altered photoperiod and as consequence altered circadian system, known as chronodisruption, that may result from the COVID-19 lockdown.
Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health San Antonio , San Antonio, Texas, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32519912 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3007
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Author (up) Ben-Attia, M.; Reinberg, A.; Smolensky, M.H.; Gadacha, W.; Khedaier, A.; Sani, M.; Touitou, Y.; Boughamni, N.G.
Title Blooming rhythms of cactus Cereus peruvianus with nocturnal peak at full moon during seasons of prolonged daytime photoperiod Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 419-430
Keywords Plants; Moonlight
Abstract Cereus peruvianus (Peruvian apple cactus) is a large erect and thorny succulent cactus characterized by column-like (cereus [L]: column), that is, candle-shaped, appendages. For three successive years (1100 days), between early April and late November, we studied the flowering patterns of eight cacti growing in public gardens and rural areas of north and central Tunisia, far from nighttime artificial illumination, in relation to natural environmental light, temperature, relative humidity and precipitation parameters. Flower blooming was assessed nightly between 23:00 h and until at least 02:00 h, and additionally around-the-clock at ~1 h intervals for 30 consecutive days during the late summer of each year of study to quantify both nyctohemeral (day-night) and lunar patterns. During the summer months of prolonged daytime photoperiod, flower blooming of C. peruvianus exhibited predictable-in-time variation as “waves” with average period of 29.5 days synchronized by the light of the full moon. The large-sized flower (~16 cm diameter) opens almost exclusively at night, between sunset and sunrise, as a 24 h rhythm during a specific 3-4-day span of the lunar cycle (full moon), with a strong correlation between moon phase and number and proportion of flowers in bloom (ranging from r = +0.59 to +0.91). Black, blue and red cotton sheets were used to filter specific spectral bands of nighttime moonlight from illuminating randomly selected plant appendages as a means to test the hypothesis of a “gating” 24 h rhythm phenomenon of photoreceptors at the bud level. Relative to control conditions (no light filtering), black sheet covering inhibited flower bud induction by 87.5%, red sheet covering by 46.6% and blue sheet covering by 34%, and the respective inhibiting effects on number of flowers in bloom were essentially 100%, ~81% and ~44%. C. peruvianus is a unique example of a terrestrial plant that exhibits a circadian flowering rhythm (peak ~00:00 h) “gated” by 24 h, lunar 29.5-day (bright light of full moon) and annual 365.25-day (prolonged summertime day length) environmental photoperiod cycles.
Address e Departement des Sciences de la Vie, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte , Universite de Carthage , Zarzouna , Tunisie
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27030087 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1411
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Author (up) Boivin, D.B.; Boudreau, P.; James, F.O.; Kin, N.M.K.N.Y.
Title Photic resetting in night-shift work: impact on nurses' sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 619-628
Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; *Darkness; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Middle Aged; *Nurses; Sleep/*physiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology
Abstract The objective of this study was to quantify daytime sleep in night-shift workers with and without an intervention designed to recover the normal relationship between the endogenous circadian pacemaker and the sleep/wake cycle. Workers of the treatment group received intermittent exposure to full-spectrum bright light during night shifts and wore dark goggles during the morning commute home. All workers maintained stable 8-h daytime sleep/darkness schedules. The authors found that workers of the treatment group had daytime sleep episodes that lasted 7.1 +/- .1 h (mean +/- SEM) versus 6.6 +/- .2 h for workers in the control group (p = .04). The increase in total sleep time co-occurred with a larger proportion of the melatonin secretory episode during daytime sleep in workers of the treatment group. The results of this study showed reestablishment of a phase angle that is comparable to that observed on a day-oriented schedule favors longer daytime sleep episodes in night-shift workers. (Author correspondence: diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca ).
Address Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22621359 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 144
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Author (up) Boivin, D.B.; Boudreau, P.; Tremblay, G.M.
Title Phototherapy and orange-tinted goggles for night-shift adaptation of police officers on patrol Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 629-640
Keywords Human Health; Adaptation, Physiological/*physiology; Adult; Attention/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Color; Darkness; *Eye Protective Devices/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Light; Male; Melatonin/analogs & derivatives/metabolism/urine; Phototherapy/*adverse effects; *Police; Psychomotor Performance/*physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology
Abstract The aim of the present combined field and laboratory study was to assess circadian entrainment in two groups of police officers working seven consecutive 8/8.5-h night shifts as part of a rotating schedule. Eight full-time police officers on patrol (mean age +/- SD: 29.8 +/- 6.5 yrs) were provided an intervention consisting of intermittent exposure to wide-spectrum bright light at night, orange-tinted goggles at sunrise, and maintenance of a regular sleep/darkness episode in the day. Orange-tinted goggles have been shown to block the melatonin-suppressing effect of light significantly more than neutral gray density goggles. Nine control group police officers (mean age +/- SD: 30.3 +/- 4.1 yrs) working the same schedule were enrolled. Police officers were studied before, after (in the laboratory), and during (ambulatory) a series of seven consecutive nights. Urine samples were collected at wake time and bedtime throughout the week of night work and during laboratory visits (1 x /3 h) preceding and following the work week to measure urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (UaMT6s) excretion rate. Subjective alertness was assessed at the start, middle, and end of night shifts. A 10-min psychomotor vigilance task was performed at the start and end of each shift. Both laboratory visits consisted of two 8-h sleep episodes based on the prior schedule. Saliva samples were collected 2 x /h during waking episodes to assay their melatonin content. Subjective alertness (3 x /h) and performance (1 x /2 h) were assessed during wake periods in the laboratory. A mixed linear model was used to analyze the progression of UaMt6s excreted during daytime sleep episodes at home, as well as psychomotor performance and subjective alertness during night shifts. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (factors: laboratory visit and group) were used to compare peak salivary melatonin and UaMT6s excretion rate in the laboratory. In both groups of police officers, the excretion rate of UaMT6s at home was higher during daytime sleep episodes at the end compared to the start of the work week (p < .001). This rate increased significantly more in the intervention than control group (p = .032). A significant phase delay of salivary melatonin was observed in both groups at the end of study (p = .009), although no significant between-group difference was reached. Reaction speed dropped, and subjective alertness decreased throughout the night shift in both groups (p < .001). Reaction speed decreased throughout the work week in the control group (p </= .021), whereas no difference was observed in the intervention group. Median reaction time was increased as of the 5th and 6th nights compared to the 2nd night in controls (p </= .003), whereas it remained stable in the intervention group. These observations indicate better physiological adaptation in the intervention group compared to the controls.
Address Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms , Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22621360 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 509
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Author (up) Borniger, J.C.; Maurya, S.K.; Periasamy, M.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Acute dim light at night increases body mass, alters metabolism, and shifts core body temperature circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 31 Issue 8 Pages 917-925
Keywords Animals; Body temperature; calorimetry; circadian; light at night; metabolism
Abstract The circadian system is primarily entrained by the ambient light environment and is fundamentally linked to metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship among aberrant light exposure, shift work, and metabolic disease. Previous research has demonstrated deleterious metabolic phenotypes elicited by chronic (>4 weeks) exposure to dim light at night (DLAN) ( approximately 5 lux). However, the metabolic effects of short-term (<2 weeks) exposure to DLAN are unspecified. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations would arise in response to just 2 weeks of DLAN. Specifically, we predicted that mice exposed to dim light would gain more body mass, alter whole body metabolism, and display altered body temperature (Tb) and activity rhythms compared to mice maintained in dark nights. Our data largely support these predictions; DLAN mice gained significantly more mass, reduced whole body energy expenditure, increased carbohydrate over fat oxidation, and altered temperature circadian rhythms. Importantly, these alterations occurred despite similar activity locomotor levels (and rhythms) and total food intake between groups. Peripheral clocks are potently entrained by body temperature rhythms, and the deregulation of body temperature we observed may contribute to metabolic problems due to “internal desynchrony” between the central circadian oscillator and temperature sensitive peripheral clocks. We conclude that even relatively short-term exposure to low levels of nighttime light can influence metabolism to increase mass gain.
Address Department of Neuroscience and
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24933325 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 846
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Author (up) Canazei, M.; Pohl, W.; Bliem, H.R.; Weiss, E.M.
Title Acute effects of different light spectra on simulated night-shift work without circadian alignment Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 303-317
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Short-wavelength and short-wavelength-enhanced light have a strong impact on night-time working performance, subjective feelings of alertness and circadian physiology. In the present study, we investigated acute effects of white light sources with varied reduced portions of short wavelengths on cognitive and visual performance, mood and cardiac output.Thirty-one healthy subjects were investigated in a balanced cross-over design under three light spectra in a simulated night-shift paradigm without circadian adaptation.Exposure to the light spectrum with the largest attenuation of short wavelengths reduced heart rate and increased vagal cardiac parameters during the night compared to the other two light spectra without deleterious effects on sustained attention, working memory and subjective alertness. In addition, colour discrimination capability was significantly decreased under this light source.To our knowledge, the present study for the first time demonstrates that polychromatic white light with reduced short wavelengths, fulfilling current lighting standards for indoor illumination, may have a positive impact on cardiac physiology of night-shift workers without detrimental consequences for cognitive performance and alertness.
Address c Department of Psychology , University of Graz , Graz , Austria
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27579732 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1519
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