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Author Langbehn, T.; Aksnes, D.; Kaartvedt, S.; Fiksen, Ø.; Jørgensen, C.
Title Light comfort zone in a mesopelagic fish emerges from adaptive behaviour along a latitudinal gradient Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 623 Issue Pages 161-174
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract (down) Throughout the oceans, small fish and other micronekton migrate between daytimedepths of several hundred meters and near-surface waters at night. These diel vertical migrationsof mesopelagic organisms structure pelagic ecosystems through trophic interactions, and are akey element in the biological carbon pump. However, depth distributions and migration ampli-tude vary greatly. Suggested proximate causes of the migration such as oxygen, temperature, andlight often correlate and therefore the causal underpinnings have remained unclear. Using meso-pelagic fishes and the Norwegian Sea as a study system, we developed a dynamic state variablemodel that finds optimal migration patterns that we validate with acoustic observations along alatitudinal gradient. The model describes predation risk and bioenergetics, and maximizes ex -pected energy surplus, a proxy for Darwinian fitness. The model allows us to disentangle the driv-ers of migration and make predictions about depth distribution and related fitness consequencesalong a latitudinal trajectory with strong gradients in environmental drivers and vertical distribu-tion of scattering layers. We show that the model-predicted vertical migration of mesopelagicfishes matches that observed along this transect. For most situations, modelled mesopelagic fishbehaviour can be well described by a light comfort zone near identical to that derived from obser-vations. By selectively keeping light or temperature constant, the model reveals that temperature,in comparison with light, has little effect on depth distribution. We find that water clarity, whichlimits how deeply light can penetrate into the ocean, structures daytime depths, while surfacelight at night controlled the depth of nocturnal ascents.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2598
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Author Clarke, J.A.
Title Moonlight's influence on predator/prey interactions between short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) and deermice (Peromyscus maniculatus) Type Journal Article
Year 1983 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 205-209
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) This study examines the effect of moonlight intensity on deermouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) vulnerability to predation by short-eared owls (Asio flammeus).

Three nocturnal light intensities, labeled new moon, quarter moon, and full moon, were simulated in a flight chamber. Deermouse activity was observed and measured by an index of tracking intensity in the chamber's sand floor. The mice were then exposed to predation by a short-eared owl in each light intensity and search time, chase time, capture time, and the number of escapes/chase were measured.

The results reveal the adaptive significance of deermouse activity suppression in full moon light as an anti-predator response. The deermice reduced activity significantly in bright moonlight during the activity phases. During the predation phases, the owls' hunting effectiveness increased as moonlight waxed. The owls required significantly less time to search for and capture the mice as illumination increased.

The costs and benefits to both species are discussed relative to the prey's variation of activity with moonlight intensity.
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ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 421
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Author Sung, C. Y., & Kim, Y.-J.
Title Analysis of the Status of Light Pollution and its Potential Effect on Ecosystem of the Deogyusan National Park Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Korean Journal of Environment and Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 34 Issue 1 Pages 63-71
Keywords Conservation; Ecology; Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) This study characterized the spatial and seasonal patterns of light pollution in the Deogyusan National Park and examined the potential effects of light pollution on ecosystems in the park using light intensities derived from VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) DNB (Day and Night Band) nightlight images collected in January and August 2018. Results showed that the Muju Deogyusan resort had the greatest light intensity than other sources of light pollution in the park, and light intensity of the resort was much higher in January than in August, suggesting that artificial lights in ski slopes and facilities were the major source of light pollution in the park. An analysis of an urban-natural light pollution gradient along a neighboring urban area through the inside of the park indicated that light radiated from a light pollution source permeated for up to 1km into the adjacent area and contaminated the edge area of the park. Of the legally protected species whose distributions were reported in literature, four mammals (Martes flavigula, Mustela nivalis, Prionailurus bengalensis, Pteromys volans aluco), two birds (Falco subbuteo, Falco tinnunculus), and nine amphibians and reptiles (Onychodactylus koreanus, Hynobius leechii, Karsenia koreana, Rana dybowskii, Rana huanrenensis, Elaphe dione, Rhabdophis tigrinus, Gloydius ussuriensis, Gloydius saxatilis) inhabited light-polluted areas. Of those species inhabiting light-polluted areas, nocturnal species, such as Prionailurus bengalensis and Pteromys volans aluco, in particular, were vulnerable to light pollution. These results implied that protecting ecosystems from light pollution in national parks requires managing nighttime light in the parks and surrounding areas and making a plan to manage nighttime light pollution by taking into account ecological characteristics of wild animals in the parks.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2948
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Author Grant, R.; Halliday, T.; Chadwick, E.
Title Amphibians' response to the lunar synodic cycle--a review of current knowledge, recommendations, and implications for conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology
Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 53-62
Keywords amphibians; circular statistics; light; lunar cycle; moon phase; predator avoidance; reproductive synchronization; moonlight
Abstract (down) The way in which amphibians respond to the geophysical changes brought about by the lunar synodic cycle is a neglected area of their ecology, but one which has recently generated interest. Knowledge of how amphibians respond to lunar phase is of intrinsic interest and also may be important for conservation and monitoring of populations. We surveyed the literature on amphibians’ responses to the lunar cycle and found 79 examples where moon phase in relation to amphibian behavior and ecology had been studied, across diverse amphibian taxa. Of the examples reviewed, most of them show some type of response to lunar phase, with only a few species being unaffected. We found that there is no significant difference between the numbers of species which increase, and those that decrease activity or reproductive behavior (including calling) during a full moon. The responses to the lunar cycle can not be generalized across taxonomic group, but instead are highly species specific and relate directly to the species’ ecology. The primary reasons for changes in amphibian behavior in response to the lunar cycle appear to be temporal synchronization of breeding and predator avoidance. Responses to changes in prey availability, facilitation of visual signalling and use of lunar cues in navigation and homing are less prevalent but merit further investigation. Comparisons between studies are hampered by differences in field and analytical methods; we therefore make a number of recommendations for future collection and analysis of data related to lunar phase.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 81
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Davies, T.W.; Nedelec, S.L.; Holt, L.A.
Title Impacts of Artificial Light at Night on Biological Timings Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Abbreviated Journal Annu. Rev. Ecol. Evol. Syst.
Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 49-68
Keywords Animals; Plants; Review
Abstract (down) The use of artificial lighting to illuminate the night has provided substantial benefits to humankind. It has also disrupted natural daily, seasonal, and lunar light cycles as experienced by a diversity of organisms, and hence it has also altered cues for the timings of many biological activities. Here we review the evidence for impacts of artificial nighttime lighting on these timings. Although the examples are scattered, concerning a wide variety of species and environments, the breadth of such impacts is compelling. Indeed, it seems reasonable to conclude that the vast majority of impacts of artificial nighttime lighting stem from effects on biological timings. This adds support to arguments that artificial nighttime lighting has a quite pervasive and marked impact on ecological systems, that the rapid expansion in the global extent of both direct illuminance and skyglow is thus of significant concern, and that a widespread implementation of mitigation measures is required.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1543-592X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2449
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