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Author Katz, N.; Pruitt, J.N.; Scharf, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The complex effect of illumination, temperature, and thermal acclimation on habitat choice and foraging behavior of a pit-building wormlion Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 71 Issue 9 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Habitat selection has consequences for an animal’s fitness, especially for sit-and-wait predators with limited mobility, and which cannot always correct earlier suboptimal choices. Environmental change may nevertheless lead individuals to relocate to another site, although such relocations can be energetically costly or risky. Temperature and illumination are two important factors that undergo change in seasonal and daily cycles that may impact habitat quality. Animals must therefore either acclimate to the new conditions or relocate. Wormlions are sit-and-wait, trap-building predators whose success in foraging is highly dependent on their surroundings. Here, we manipulated temperature (high, low, and moderate) and let the wormlions choose between lit and shaded conditions. We found that the typical wormlion preference for shaded microhabitats decreased with increasing temperature. We then followed wormlion behavior under a full-factorial design of two constant illumination conditions (light vs. shade) and three temperatures. Although both constant light and high temperature reduced foraging performance, expressed in pit construction tendency and pit area, the two conditions had a non-additive effect. Acclimation to extreme thermal conditions moderated the negative effects of such temperatures, expressed in a higher tendency to construct a pit, and equalized performance across temperatures. Finally, the high temperature reduced behavioral consistency while acclimation increased it, suggesting that consistency is impaired by unfavorable environmental change. To conclude, while an environmental change usually affects several environmental factors simultaneously, the induced behavioral change is neither synergic nor additive and can even differ from the response to each unfavorable environmental factor in isolation.  
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  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1702  
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Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Roth, T.C. 2nd; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Ecophysiology: Integrating Neuroscience and Ecology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol  
  Volume 31 Issue 8 Pages 590-599  
  Keywords Commentary; Physiology  
  Abstract (up) Here, we propose an original approach to explain one of the great unresolved questions in animal biology: what is the function of sleep? Existing ecological and neurological approaches to this question have become roadblocks to an answer. Ecologists typically treat sleep as a simple behavior, instead of a heterogeneous neurophysiological state, while neuroscientists generally fail to appreciate the critical insights offered by the consideration of ecology and evolutionary history. Redressing these shortfalls requires cross-disciplinary integration. By bringing together aspects of behavioral ecology, evolution, and conservation with neurophysiology, we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of sleep, including its implications for adaptive waking behavior and fitness.  
  Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: j.lesku@latrobe.edu.au  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27262386 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1462  
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Author Swaddle, J.P.; Francis, C.D.; Barber, J.R.; Cooper, C.B.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Dominoni, D.M.; Shannon, G.; Aschehoug, E.; Goodwin, S.E.; Kawahara, A.Y.; Luther, D.; Spoelstra, K.; Voss, M.; Longcore, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A framework to assess evolutionary responses to anthropogenic light and sound Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution  
  Volume 30 Issue 9 Pages 550–560  
  Keywords animals, biology, ecology, evolution  
  Abstract (up) Human activities have caused a near-ubiquitous and evolutionarily-unprecedented increase in environmental sound levels and artificial night lighting. These stimuli reorganize communities by interfering with species-specific perception of time-cues, habitat features, and auditory and visual signals. Rapid evolutionary changes could occur in response to light and noise, given their magnitude, geographical extent, and degree to which they represent unprecedented environmental conditions. We present a framework for investigating anthropogenic light and noise as agents of selection, and as drivers of other evolutionary processes, to influence a range of behavioral and physiological traits such as phenological characters and sensory and signaling systems. In this context, opportunities abound for understanding contemporary and rapid evolution in response to human-caused environmental change.  
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  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1202  
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Author Vignoli, L.; Luiselli, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Better in the dark: two Mediterranean amphibians synchronize reproduction with moonlit nights Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Web Ecology Abbreviated Journal Web Ecol.  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 1-11  
  Keywords animals; amphibians; Hyla intermedia; Rana dalmatina; *Reproduction; reproductive strategies; Moon; moon phase; moonlight  
  Abstract (up) In Amphibians, both positive and negative correlations between activity and full moon phase have been observed. In this study, we present data for two anuran species (Hyla intermedia and Rana dalmatina) studied in a hilly Mediterranean area of central Italy. We analysed, in a two-year survey, the relationships between the number of egg clutches laid each night and the moon phases by means of circular statistics. Moreover, the studied species exhibited clear oviposition site selection behaviour influenced, at least in H. intermedia, by moon phases. We observed the occurrence of an avoidance effect by amphibians for oviposition and specific egg-laying behaviour during moon phases around the full moon. This apparent lunar phobia was evident in both species when yearly data were pooled. On the other hand, while this pattern continued to be also evident in H. intermedia when single years were considered, in R. dalmatina it stood just in one year of study. Nonetheless, during cloudy nights, when moonlight arriving on the ground was low, the frogs' behaviour was similar to that observed in new moon phases. We interpreted the observed pattern as an anti-predatory strategy. Overall, comparisons between our own study and previous research suggest that there was insufficient evidence to establish any unequivocal patterns and that further research in this regard is needed.  
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  ISSN 1399-1183 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 80  
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Author Derryberry, E.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dawn song in natural and artificial continuous day: Light pollution affects songbirds at high latitudes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume 86 Issue 6 Pages 1283-1285  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals  
  Abstract (up) In Focus: Da Silva, A., & Kempenaers, B. (2017). Singing from North to South: Latitudinal variation in timing of dawn singing under natural and artificial light conditions. Journal of Animal Ecology, 86, 1286-1297. doi: 10.1111/1365-2656.12739 Satellite images of the world at night show bright dots connected by glowing lines crisscrossing the globe. As these connect-the-dots become brighter and expand into more and more remote regions, much of the flora and fauna of the world are experiencing evolutionarily unprecedented levels of light at night. Light cues are essential to most physiological and behavioural processes, and so the need to measure the effects of light pollution on these processes is critical. In this issue, Da Silva and Kempenaers take on this task using an important reproductive behaviour in songbirds-dawn song. The geographic, temporal and taxonomic breadth of sampling in this study allows for a close examination of a potentially complex interaction between light pollution and natural variation in the behaviour of dawn singing across latitude, season and species. Their extensive dataset highlights complexity in how songbirds respond to light pollution. Although light pollution has a strong effect on the timing of dawn song, not all songbirds respond the same way to light pollution, and the effects of light pollution vary with changes in natural light levels. Early dawn singers show more flexibility in the timing of dawn song across the season and across latitudes than late dawn singers, and also appear less affected by light pollution at high latitudes than are late dawn singers. These findings suggest that not all songbirds are responding to artificial continuous daylight as they do to natural continuous daylight, highlighting the general need to measure the fitness effects of light pollution.  
  Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:29047141 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1772  
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