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Author (down) Mercier, A.; Ycaza, R.; Hamel, J.
Title Long-term study of gamete release in a broadcast-spawning holothurian: predictable lunar and diel periodicities Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 329 Issue Pages 179-189
Keywords Spawning; Periodicity; Lunar cycle; Reproductive synchrony; Holothurians; Echinoderms; Isostichopus fuscus
Abstract Annual and monthly patterns of gamete release by the sea cucumber Isostichopus fuscus on the coast of Ecuador were studied to determine the proximal spawning cue and variations in reproductive output throughout the year. Several hundred newly collected individuals were monitored nearly every month for 4 yr. I. fuscus displayed a lunar spawning periodicity: 0.7 to 34.9% of individuals consistently spawned 1 to 4 d after the new moon. Spawning mostly occurred within one evening; however, some gamete release was often recorded over 2 to 4 consecutive evenings. Individuals maintained in captivity for several months retained their spawning periodicity and timing with the lunar cycle. Conversely, newly caught individuals that were shaded from the moonlight did not spawn, thus demonstrating the apparent lack of endogenous rhythms and prevalence of lunar luminance over other cues (i.e. tidal cycle, fluctuations in barometric pressure). On a spawning night, males typically initiated gamete release around sunset; females spawned just after the peak male broadcast. The percentage of spawning individuals was higher and a greater overlap between male and female peak spawning activity was observed during clear conditions compared with overcast conditions. The gonads of individuals that did not spawn in a given month showed a variety of maturity levels, including post-spawning, growth and mature gametogenic stages. Hence, the individual reproductive cycle is apparently longer than the monthly spawning periodicity observed at the population level, enabling I. fuscus populations to be reproductive year round.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 104
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Author (down) McMahon, T.A.; Rohr, J.R.; Bernal, X.E.
Title Light and noise pollution interact to disrupt interspecific interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology
Volume 98 Issue 5 Pages 1290-1299
Keywords Animals
Abstract Studies on the consequences of urbanization often examine the effects of light, noise, and heat pollution independently on isolated species providing a limited understanding of how these combined stressors affect species interactions. Here, we investigate how these factors interact to affect parasitic frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.) and their tungara frog (Engystomops pustulosus) hosts. A survey of tungara frog calling sites revealed that frog abundance was not significantly correlated with urbanization, light, noise, or temperature. In contrast, frog-biting midges were sensitive to light pollution and noise pollution. Increased light intensity significantly reduced midge abundance at low noise levels. At high noise intensity, there were no midges regardless of light level. Two field experiments controlling light and noise levels to examine attraction of the midges to their host and their feeding behavior confirmed the causality of these field patterns. These findings demonstrate that both light and noise pollution disrupt this host-parasite interaction and highlight the importance of considering interactions among species and types of pollutants to accurately assess the impacts of urbanization on ecological communities.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47907, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28170099 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2443
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Author (down) Maggi, E.; Bongiorni, L.; Fontanini, D.; Capocchi, A.; Dal Bello, M.; Giacomelli, A.; Benedetti‐Cecchi, L.
Title Artificial light at night erases positive interactions across trophic levels Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Functional Ecology Abbreviated Journal Funct Ecol
Volume in press Issue Pages 1365-2435.13485
Keywords Ecology; Bacteria; Ecosystems
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one of the most recently recognized sources of anthropogenic disturbance, with potentially severe effects on biological systems that are still to be fully explored. Among marine ecosystems, high shore habitats are those more likely to be impacted by ALAN, due to a more intense exposition to outdoor nocturnal lightings (mostly from lamps along coastal streets and promenades, or within harbors, ports and marinas).

2.By performing in situ nocturnal manipulations of a direct source of white LED light and presence of herbivores in a Mediterranean high‐shore habitat, we assessed the interactive effects of light pollution and grazing on two key functional components of the epilithic microbial community (the cyanobacteria, as the main photoautotrophic component, and the other bacteria, mainly dominated by heterotrophs) developing on rocky shores.

3.Results showed an unexpected increase in the diversity of epilithic bacterial biofilm at unlit sites in the presence of grazers, that was more evident on the other (mainly heterotrophic) bacterial component, when giving weight to more abundant families. This effect was likely related to the mechanical removal of dead cells through the grazing activity of consumers. ALAN significantly modified this scenario, by reducing the density of grazers and thus erasing their effects on bacteria, and by increasing the diversity of more abundant cyanobacterial families.

4.Overall, direct and indirect effects on ALAN resulted in a significant increase in the diversity of the photoautotrophic component and a decrease in the heterotrophic one, likely affecting key ecosystem functions acting on rocky shore habitats.

5.ALAN may represent a threat for natural systems through the annihilation of positive interactions across trophic levels, potentially impairing the relationship between biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems and interacting with other global and local stressors currently impinging on coastal areas.
Address Dip. di Biologia, CoNISMa, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy; elena.maggi(at)unipi.it
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher British Ecological Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2746
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Author (down) Maggi, E.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.
Title Trophic compensation stabilizes marine primary producers exposed to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 606 Issue Pages 1-5
Keywords Plants; Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread phenomenon along coastal areas. Despite increasing evidence of pervasive effects of ALAN on patterns of species distribution and abundance, the potential of this emerging threat to alter ecological processes in marine ecosystems has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show how exposure to white LED lighting, comparable to that experienced along local urbanized coasts, significantly enhanced the impact of grazing gastropods on epilithic microphytobenthos (MPB). ALAN increased both the photosynthetic biomass of MPB and the grazing pressure of gastropods, such that consumers compensated for the positive effect of night lighting on primary producers. Our results indicate that trophic interactions can provide a stabilizing compensatory mechanism against ALAN effects in natural food webs.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2063
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Author (down) Longcore, T.; Rich, C.
Title Ecological light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Volume 2 Issue 4 Pages 191-198
Keywords Ecology
Abstract Ecologists have long studied the critical role of natural light in regulating species interactions, but, with limited exceptions, have not investigated the consequences of artificial night lighting. In the past century, the extent and intensity of artificial night lighting has increased such that it has substantial effects on the biology and ecology of species in the wild. We distinguish “astronomical light pollution”, which obscures the view of the night sky, from “ecological light pollution”, which alters natural light regimes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Some of the catastrophic consequences of light for certain taxonomic groups are well known, such as the deaths of migratory birds around tall lighted structures, and those of hatchling sea turtles disoriented by lights on their natal beaches. The more subtle influences of artificial night lighting on the behavior and community ecology of species are less well recognized, and constitute a new focus for research in ecology and a pressing conservation challenge.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 480
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