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Author (up) Cruz, L.M.; Shillinger, G.L.; Robinson, N.J.; Tomillo, P.S.; Paladino, F.V.
Title Effect of light intensity and wavelength on the in-water orientation of olive ridley turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 505 Issue Pages 52-56
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution, associated with coastal development, poses a growing threat to sea turtles. Hatchlings are particularly affected during their crawl to the ocean since they exhibit phototaxis and may move towards or be disoriented by artificial lights. Although much is known about how hatchlings respond to artificial light while crawling to the ocean, far less is known about their response after reaching the water. Here, we investigate how hatchling olive ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) held in artificial pools responded to light of different wavelengths (red, 720 nm; yellow, 660 nm and green, 520 nm) and intensities (0.1–3.3 lx, mean 0.87 lx, SD = 0.85, 10.3–45.9 lx, mean 15.75 lx,SD = 7.12; 47.5–84.2 lx; mean 52.02 lx, SD = 9.11; 91.3–140.8 lx, mean 105 lx, SD = 13.24; 150.1–623 lx, mean 172.18 lx, SD = 73.42). When no light or red light below 39 lx was present, hatchlings oriented at a mean angle of 180° from true north and did not orient towards any discernable feature. However, hatchlings swam towards the light at intensities of red light above 39 lx, yellow light above 10 lx and green light above 5 lx. Our findings indicate that sea turtles will swim towards artificial lights even after reaching the water. Thus, we recommend light mitigation efforts should extend beyond nesting beaches and into the associated oceanic habitats.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1894
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Author (up) Da Silva, A.; Kempenaers, B.
Title Singing from North to South: latitudinal variation in timing of dawn singing under natural and artificial light conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract 1. Animals breeding at northern latitudes experience drastic changes in daily light conditions during the breeding season with decreasing periods of darkness, whereas those living at lower latitudes are exposed to naturally dark nights throughout the year. Nowadays, many animals are also exposed to artificial night lighting (often referred to as light pollution). 2. Animals strongly rely on variation in light levels to time their daily and seasonal behaviour. Previous work on passerine birds showed that artificial night lighting leads to earlier onset of dawn song. However, these studies were carried out at intermediate latitudes with more limited seasonal changes in daylength, and we still lack an understanding of the impact of artificial night lighting in relation to variation in natural light conditions. 3. We investigated the influence of natural and artificial light conditions on the timing of dawn singing in five common songbird species in each of three regions in Europe that differed in natural variation in daylength (northern Finland, 65 degrees N; southern Germany, 48 degrees N; southern Spain, 37 degrees N). In each region, we selected five peri-urban forest sites with and five without street lighting, and recorded dawn singing at the beginning of the local breeding season. 4. Our results show that the earliest natural singers, i.e., European robins (Erithacus rubecula) and common blackbirds (Turdus merula), started dawn singing earlier along with the natural increase in night brightness in Finland, with no additional effects of artificial night lighting. In contrast, the later singers, i.e., great tits (Parus major), blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), and chaffinches (Fringilla coelebs), showed similar onsets of dawn song relative to sunrise across the season and similar effects of artificial night lighting at all latitudes. 5. Artificial night lighting affected great tits, blue tits and chaffinches even in northern Finland where nights became very bright. Proximate factors such as differential light sensitivities may explain why early singers showed more plastic behavioural responses to naturally and artificially bright nights. The maintenance of rhythmicity in the late singers during bright northern nights and under artificial night lighting may also be an adaptive response to predation risk or costs of sleep loss. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28796893 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1704
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Author (up) Daoud-Opit, S.; Jones, D.N.
Title Guided by the light: Roost choice and behaviour of urban Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 72-80
Keywords Animals
Abstract 1. The formation of large communal roosts is a conspicuous phenomenon associated with a wide range of bird species successfully exploiting urban environments. In many Australian cities, the abundance of the Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), a native parrot, has increased markedly in recent decades, with the species roosting in very large numbers within suburban sites. These roosting locations are noisy and cause significant fouling of the land beneath, resulting in conflict with humans.

2. We investigated the selection of roosting sites in this species in Brisbane, Australia, by comparing characteristics of both the general sites of these roosts as well as individual trees used within roosting sites and trees that were avoided.

3. Lorikeets used a wide variety of tree types for roosting but demonstrated a clear preference for clumped trees within sparsely treed areas that received significantly more artificial light at night than otherwise suitable sites and trees nearby.

4. These features of roosting sites may enhance the detection of nocturnal predators by Rainbow Lorikeets, suggesting a potential positive impact of anthropogenic lighting. Our findings provide valuable insights into the management of roost-related conflicts in urban areas. We encourage further investigations into the possible benefits of artificial light.
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ISSN 1339-8474 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1641
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Author (up) Davies, T.W.; Duffy, J.P.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title The nature, extent, and ecological implications of marine light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 347-355
Keywords Ecology; light pollution; oceans; marine; ecology; ecosystem; Review
Abstract Despite centuries of use, artificial light at night has only recently been recognized as a cause for environmental concern. Its global extent and ongoing encroachment into naturally lit ecosystems has sparked scientific interest into the many ways in which it may negatively affect human health, societal attitudes, scientific endeavors, and biological processes. Yet, perhaps because sources of artificial light are largely land based, the potential for artificial light pollution to interfere with the biology of the ocean has not been explored in any detail. There is little information on how light pollution affects those species, behaviors, and interactions that are informed by the intensity, spectra, and periodicity of natural nighttime light in marine ecosystems. Here, we provide an overview of the extent of marine light pollution, discuss how it changes the physical environment, and explore its potential role in shaping marine ecosystems.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Cornwall, UK
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ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 365
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Author (up) Degen, T.; Mitesser, O.; Perkin, E.K.; Weiss, N.-S.; Oehlert, M.; Mattig, E.; Hölker, F.
Title Street lighting: sex-independent impacts on moth movement Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Biology
Abstract 1.Artificial lights have become an integral and welcome part of our urban and peri-urban environments. However, recent research has highlighted the potentially negative ecological consequences of ubiquitous artificial light. In particular, insects, especially moths, are expected to be negatively impacted by the presence of artificial lights. Previous research with light traps has shown a male-biased attraction to light in moths. 2.In this study, we sought to determine if street lights could limit moth dispersal and if there was any sex bias in attraction to light. More specifically, we aimed to determine sex specific attraction radii for moths to street lights. 3.We tested these hypotheses by collecting moths for two years at an experimental setup. To estimate the attraction radii we developed a Markov model and related it to the acquired data. 4.Utilizing multinomial statistics, we found that attraction rates to lights in the middle of the matrix were substantially lower than predicted by the null hypothesis of equal attraction level (0.44 times). With the Markov model, we estimated that a corner-light was 2.77 times more attractive than a wing-light with an equivalent attraction radius of c. 23m around each light. We found neither sexual differences in the attraction rate nor in the attraction radius of males and females. Since we captured three times more males than females, we conclude that sex ratios are representative of operational sex ratios or of different flight activities. 5.These results provide evidence for street lights to limit moth dispersal, and that they seem to act equally on male and female moths. Consequently, public lighting might divide a suitable landscape into many small habitats. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume i) that public lighting near hedges and bushes or field margins reduces the quality of these important habitat structures, and ii) that public lighting near important habitat structures but not interfering with local movement may affect moth movement between patches. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27146262 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1439
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