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Author (up) Abd Mutalib, A.H.; Fadzly, N.; Ahmad, A.; Nasir, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Understanding nesting ecology and behaviour of green marine turtles at Setiu, Terengganu, Malaysia Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Marine Ecology Abbreviated Journal Mar Ecol  
  Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 1003-1012  
  Keywords Chelonia mydas; conservation; green turtles; nesting behaviour; nesting ecology; sea turtles; reptiles; marine reptiles; verterbrates; ecology; Sea turtle conservation; Setiu; Malaysia  
  Abstract In this paper, we emphasize the importance of understanding the nesting ecology and nesting behaviour of green marine turtles (Chelonia mydas). Data were collected from 2007 until 2012 from nesting beaches at Setiu Terengganu, Malaysia. We focused on one of the beaches, Telaga Papan, based on data collected in 2012. We recorded the distribution of nesting areas, the emergence hour and the correlation between successful nesting attempts and false crawls. Telaga Papan had a significantly higher distribution of green marine turtle nesting compared with the other five beaches (ANOVA, F5,42 = 8.874, P < 0.01, mean = 36.750 ± 3.727). The highest number of successful nesting attempts was recorded in 2012 (mean = 28.714). A majority of the species landed between 22:00 and 23:59 h (25%). There was a strong correlation between successful nesting attempts and false crawls (rs = 0.883, P = 0.02). Based on these findings on the nesting ecology and nesting behaviour of green marine turtles, we suggest that scientific research, strict monitoring, awareness programs and policy implementation should be carried out proactively. Such activities are necessary to reduce the anthropogenic pressures at the nesting beaches as well as to ensure more successful nesting attempts of green marine turtles in Setiu.  
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  ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 369  
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Author (up) Alldredge, A.L.; King, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of moonlight on the vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton Type Journal Article
  Year 1980 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 133-156  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The diel vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton, those organisms which habit bottom substrates but periodically emerge to swim freely in the water column, water determined throughout the lunar cycle. Demersal zooplankton were quantitatively sampled on a subtidal sand flat in the Gulf of California every 2 h for 24-h periods at new, full, first, and last-quarter moons, both as they emerged into the water column and as they returned to the benthos. Demersal zooplankton rarely migrated during daylight. Three general patterns of migration were observed. (1) Polychaetes and cumaceans emerged from the benthos at dusk, regardless of the phase of the moon. Polychaetes returned to the benthos throughout the night while cumaceans returned near dawn. (2) Species of amphipods and isopods exhibited significant avoidance of moonlight, delaying emergence until moonset or returning to the benthos at moonrise. (3) Species of copepods, mysids, shrimp, Branchiostoma (cephalochordate), and tanaids emerged into the water column throughout the night. The timing of migration was highly variable and did not correlate with the presence or absence of moonlight. Large zooplankton migrated less frequently into the water column during moonlit periods than small forms, suggesting that nocturnal predation by visually oriented planktivorous fish may be an important selective pressure.

Demersal zooplankton emerged into artificially darkened emergence traps in significantly higher numbers during daylight and during full and quarter moons than into undarkened control traps, demonstrating that absence of light is a major cue stimulating migration. Reentry traps resting on the bottom captured higher densities of demersal zooplankton than either emergence traps or reentry traps suspended off the bottom. Thus, many demersal zooplankton remain near the bottom, rarely swimming far into the water column. Some trap avoidance was observed and current methods for collecting demersal zooplankton are evaluated. Since most demersal zooplankton remained in the water column only a short time, dispersal, particularly over short distances, may be a major advantage of migratory behavior. Migration facilitates rapid recolonization of disturbed or defaunated sites, disrupts and mixes bottom sediments, and results in daily variation in the microdistribution, patchiness, and species composition of the benthic fauna.
 
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  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 423  
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Author (up) Alquezar, R.D.; Macedo, R.H.; Sierro, J.; Gil, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lack of consistent responses to aircraft noise in dawn song timing of bird populations near tropical airports Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 74 Issue 7 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Birds living near airports can reduce the noise interference by advancing their dawn chorus timing and avoiding the start of airport operations. Data supporting this finding come from temperate areas, but little is known from tropical environments, where seasonal variation is lower and biodiversity is higher. Here, we investigated whether 15 tropical bird species are able to advance their dawn song and avoid aircraft noise interference. We sampled dawn song in three airports and three control sites in Brazil, using automated recording units. We found that dawn song times were not globally affected by the exposure to airport noise. Instead, changes were highly variable and species-specific, as dawn song onset was significantly advanced in two and delayed in four species. This large variation in responses was surprising given patterns found in previous studies. Indeed, this is the first time that a significant delay is reported for bird’s dawn song. We explored whether between-species differences in this response could be explained by additional variables (song frequency, degree of urbanity, and noise release), but none of them explained the direction or the strength of the changes. We suggest that earlier airport activity and shorter variations in day length and in twilight duration of tropical areas may be restricting birds’ ability to change dawn song timing. Further studies should consider these differences and analyze to what extent populational declines in noisy areas and the resultant reduced competition for acoustic space may be affecting the changes in dawn chorus onset time.  
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  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3017  
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Author (up) Arnaud Da Silva, Jelmer M. Samplonius, Emmi Schlicht, Mihai Valcu, Bart Kempenaers url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night lighting rather than traffic noise affects the daily timing of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 1037-1047  
  Keywords animal, birds, dawn chorus, dusk chorus, light intensity, light pollution, noise pollution, seasonality, songbird, weather  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1105  
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Author (up) Aschoff, J. url  openurl
  Title Circadian Activity Pattern with Two Peaks Type Journal Article
  Year 1966 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 47 Issue 4 Pages 657-662  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract The 24-hr rhythms of behavior and other physiological functions are based upon an endogenous self-sustained oscillation. This is proven by experiments in which animals, kept in constant conditions, show a freerunning circadian period which deviates to a certain degree from that of the earth's rotation. The 24-hr rhythms of activity are furthermore characterized by typical patterns of which the one with two peaks in one period is most common. Under natural conditions, these two peaks of activity are often closely related to specific stimuli in the environment; e.g. to dawn and dusk. They have therefore been described as being directly caused by the environment. However, one may consider not only the circadian period but also the pattern part of an endogenous system. This hypothesis has been tested in experiments with finches. The results are: 1) Birds kept in artificial light-dark cycles show the same two-peak pattern either in cycles with interposed twilight or in cycles with rectangular changes between light and dark, 2) Under constant conditions, the second peak may disappear; but more often, it either remains or becomes more pronounced tan under conditions of a light-dark cycle. 3) With different levels of constant intensity of illumination, the birds show different circadian periods and different durations of activity; under those conditions, the two peaks keep the same proportional relationship to the activity time regardless of its duration. It is concluded that the basic two-peak pattern of locomotor activity is a persistent property of the circadian oscillating system.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 711  
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