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Author (up) Hopkins, G.R.; Gaston, K.J.; Visser, M.E.; Elgar, M.A.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night as a driver of evolution across urban-rural landscapes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Front Ecol Environ  
  Volume 16 Issue 8 Pages 472-479  
  Keywords Ecology, Commentary  
  Abstract Light is fundamental to biological systems, affecting the daily rhythms of bacteria, plants, and animals. Artificial light at night (ALAN), a ubiquitous feature of urbanization, interferes with these rhythms and has the potential to exert strong selection pressures on organisms living in urban environments. ALAN also fragments landscapes, altering the movement of animals into and out of artificially lit habitats. Although research has documented phenotypic and genetic differentiation between urban and rural organisms, ALAN has rarely been considered as a driver of evolution. We argue that the fundamental importance of light to biological systems, and the capacity for ALAN to influence multiple processes contributing to evolution, makes this an important driver of evolutionary change, one with the potential to explain broad patterns of population differentiation across urban–rural landscapes. Integrating ALAN's evolutionary potential into urban ecology is a targeted and powerful approach to understanding the capacity for life to adapt to an increasingly urbanized world.  
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  ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2073  
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Author (up) Horton, K.G.; Nilsson, C.; Van Doren, B.M.; La Sorte, F.A.; Dokter, A.M.; Farnsworth, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright lights in the big cities: migratory birds’ exposure to artificial light Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Front Ecol Environ  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 209-214  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; migratory birds  
  Abstract Many species of migratory birds have evolved the ability to migrate at night, and the recent and rapid expansion of artificial light at night has markedly altered the nighttime sky through which they travel. Migrating birds regularly pass through heavily illuminated landscapes, and bright lights affect avian orientation. But risks to migrating birds from artificial light are not spatially or temporally uniform, representing a challenge for mitigating potential hazards and developing action plans to catalog risks at continental scales. We leveraged over two decades of remote‐sensing data collected by weather surveillance radar and satellite‐based sensors to identify locations and times of year when the highest numbers of migrating birds are exposed to light pollution in the contiguous US. Our continental‐scale quantification of light exposure provides a novel opportunity for dynamic and targeted conservation strategies to address the hazards posed by light pollution to nocturnally migrating birds.  
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  ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2285  
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Author (up) Horváth, G.; Kriska, G.; Malik, P.; Robertson, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Polarized light pollution: a new kind of ecological photopollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 317-325  
  Keywords light pollution; polarization; polarized light pollution  
  Abstract The alteration of natural cycles of light and dark by artificial light sources has deleterious impacts on animals and ecosystems. Many animals can also exploit a unique characteristic of light – its direction of polarization –as a source of information. We introduce the term “polarized light pollution” (PLP) to focus attention on the ecological consequences of light that has been polarized through interaction with human-made objects. Unnatural polarized light sources can trigger maladaptive behaviors in polarization-sensitive taxa and alter ecological interactions. PLP is an increasingly common byproduct of human technology, and mitigating its effects through selective use of building materials is a realistic solution. Our understanding of how most species use polarization vision is limited, but the capacity of PLP to drastically increase mortality and reproductive failure in animal populations suggests that PLP should become a focus for conservation biologists and resource managers alike.  
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  ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 22  
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Author (up) Huffeldt, N.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photic Barriers to Poleward Range-shifts Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; biological rhythm; global climate change; phenology; photoperiod; photoreception; range-shift  
  Abstract With climate warming, organisms are shifting their ranges towards the poles, tracking their optimal thermal environments. Day-length, the driver of daily and annual timing, is, however, fixed by latitude and date. Timing and photoreception mechanisms adapted to ancestral photic environments may restrict range-shift capacity, resulting in photic barriers to range-shifts.  
  Address Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, 3900 Nuuk, Greenland; Arctic Ecosystem Ecology, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. Electronic address: nph@bios.au.dk  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32473743 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2992  
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Author (up) Katz, N.; Pruitt, J.N.; Scharf, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The complex effect of illumination, temperature, and thermal acclimation on habitat choice and foraging behavior of a pit-building wormlion Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 71 Issue 9 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Habitat selection has consequences for an animal’s fitness, especially for sit-and-wait predators with limited mobility, and which cannot always correct earlier suboptimal choices. Environmental change may nevertheless lead individuals to relocate to another site, although such relocations can be energetically costly or risky. Temperature and illumination are two important factors that undergo change in seasonal and daily cycles that may impact habitat quality. Animals must therefore either acclimate to the new conditions or relocate. Wormlions are sit-and-wait, trap-building predators whose success in foraging is highly dependent on their surroundings. Here, we manipulated temperature (high, low, and moderate) and let the wormlions choose between lit and shaded conditions. We found that the typical wormlion preference for shaded microhabitats decreased with increasing temperature. We then followed wormlion behavior under a full-factorial design of two constant illumination conditions (light vs. shade) and three temperatures. Although both constant light and high temperature reduced foraging performance, expressed in pit construction tendency and pit area, the two conditions had a non-additive effect. Acclimation to extreme thermal conditions moderated the negative effects of such temperatures, expressed in a higher tendency to construct a pit, and equalized performance across temperatures. Finally, the high temperature reduced behavioral consistency while acclimation increased it, suggesting that consistency is impaired by unfavorable environmental change. To conclude, while an environmental change usually affects several environmental factors simultaneously, the induced behavioral change is neither synergic nor additive and can even differ from the response to each unfavorable environmental factor in isolation.  
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  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1702  
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