|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Dickerson, A.L.; Hall, M.L.; Jones, T.M.
Title The effect of variation in moonlight on nocturnal song of a diurnal bird species Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 74 Issue 9 Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract The lunar cycle is known to affect the behaviour of strictly nocturnal species, but for diurnal species that are periodically active during the night, this has been less investigated. Nocturnal bird song is relatively common in diurnal species, yet research on this behaviour accounts for little of the research on avian vocalisations. This is surprising given that diurnal species are adapted for bright environments and therefore may be particularly sensitive to change in the lunar cycles. We used automated bioacoustic recorders and automatic song detection software to measure nocturnal song rate in a diurnal bird where both sexes sing, the willie wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys). We deployed recorders at eight locations across four naturally dark sites resulting in 457 h of nocturnal audio. We confirmed anecdotal evidence suggesting that willie wagtails are prolific nocturnal singers during the breeding season and demonstrate that while both male and females sing during the day, nocturnal song is largely sung by males. Moreover, we show that nocturnal song increased with lunar illumination, contrasting with previous research on other diurnal species that sing at night. Our data allow us to hypothesise possible functions for nocturnal song in this species, such as territory defence or mate attraction.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3084
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kehoe, R.; Sanders, D.; Cruse, D.; Silk, M.; Gaston, K.J.; Bridle, J.R.; van Veen, F.
Title Longer photoperiods through range shifts and artificial light lead to a destabilising increase in host-parasitoid interaction strength Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Ecology; Aphid; climate change; interaction; light pollution; parasitoid; photoperiod; range expansion; stability
Abstract Many organisms are experiencing changing daily light regimes due to latitudinal range shifts driven by climate change and increased artificial light at night (ALAN). Activity patterns are often driven by light cycles, which will have important consequences for species interactions. We tested whether longer photoperiods lead to higher parasitism rates by a day-active parasitoid on its host using a laboratory experiment in which we independently varied day length and the presence of ALAN. We then tested whether reduced nighttime temperature tempers the effect of ALAN. We found that parasitism rate increased with day length, with ALAN intensifying this effect only when the temperature was not reduced at night. The impact of ALAN was more pronounced under short day length. Increased parasitoid activity was not compensated for by reduced lifespan, indicating that increased day length leads to an increase in total parasitism effects on fitness. To test the significance of increased parasitism rate for population dynamics, we developed a host-parasitoid model. The results of the model predicted an increase in time-to-equilibrium with increased day length and, crucially, a threshold day length above which interactions are unstable, leading to local extinctions. Here we demonstrate that ALAN impact interacts with day length and temperature by changing the interaction strength between a common day-active consumer species and its host in a predictable way. Our results further suggest that range expansion or ALAN induced changes in light regimes experienced by insects and their natural enemies will result in unstable dynamics beyond key tipping points in day length.
Address College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32858779 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3107
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Peng, J.; Lin, H.; Chen, Y.; Blaschke, T.; Luo, L.; Xu, Z.; Hu, Y.’na; Zhao, M.; Wu, J.
Title Spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations in China during 2000–2012: a nighttime light approach Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol
Volume 35 Issue 2 Pages 421-434
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Context

Urban agglomeration is an advanced spatial organization of cities, usually caused by urbanization processes when cities develop to a certain level – typically associated with higher population density and a certain density of built environment. However, compared with various studies focusing on specific cities, urban agglomerations are still understudied, especially for the quantitative identification of spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.

Objectives

This study aims to identify the boundary of urban agglomerations in China from 2000 to 2012, and to explore the temporal evolution and spatial difference of urban agglomerations.

Methods

Firstly, the core zone of urban agglomerations was identified using an appropriate threshold of the digital number (DN) of nighttime light. Secondly, the mean patch area and gravity model were used to determine the affected zone of urban agglomerations. Thirdly, spatiotemporal contrast was conducted focusing on the 23 main urban agglomerations in China.

Results

By 2012, the most highly developed Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta urban agglomerations met the standard of world level, with the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei urban agglomeration for regional level, as well as 11 urban agglomerations for sub-regional level. Regional differences in urban agglomerations between southern and northern China, or between coastal and inland China remained stable over the study period of 2000–2012. Compared with the western urban agglomerations, the outward expansion of eastern urban agglomerations decelerated. From 2000 to 2012, the overall development mode of urban agglomerations shifted from the core-expansion to the peripheral-development, together with slower expansion of urban agglomerations after 2006.

Conclusions

Nighttime light data are effective in exploring the spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3131
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hartung, J.
Title Light, puberty, and aggression: A proximal mechanism hypothesis Type Journal Article
Year 1978 Publication Human Ecology Abbreviated Journal Hum Ecol
Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages 273-297
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Rapidly accumulating evidence indicates that light reduces the human pineal's inhibitory effect on the gonads. Artificially extended daily photoperiods, by allowing increased production of gonadal steroids, have probably accentuated the secular growth trend and may be causing males, especially adolescents and young adults, to have an overready hormonal response to situations which elicit aggressive behavior.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0300-7839 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3187
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Straka,T. M., Wolf, M., Gras, P., Buchholz, S., & Voigt, C. C.
Title Tree Cover Mediates the Effect of Artificial Light on Urban Bats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue Pages 91
Keywords Animals; ALAN; bats; canopy cover; chiroptera; light-emitting diodes; LED; trees; Ultraviolet; urban
Abstract With urban areas growing worldwide, so does artificial light at night (ALAN) which negatively affects many nocturnal animals, including bats. The response of bats to ALAN ranges from some opportunistic species taking advantage of insect aggregations around street lamps, particularly those emitting ultraviolet (UV) light, to others avoiding lit areas at all. Tree cover has been suggested to mitigate the negative effects of ALAN on bats by shielding areas against light scatter. Here, we investigated the effect of tree cover on the relationship between ALAN and bats in Berlin, Germany. In particular, we asked if this interaction varies with the UV light spectrum of street lamps and also across urban bat species. We expected trees next to street lamps to block ALAN, making the adjacent habitat more suitable for all species, irrespective of the wavelength spectrum of the light source. Additionally, we expected UV emitting lights next to trees to attract insects and thus, opportunistic bats. In summer 2017, we recorded bat activity at 22 green open spaces in Berlin using automated ultrasonic detectors. We analyzed bat activity patterns and landscape variables (number of street lamps with and without UV light emission, an estimate of light pollution, and tree cover density around each recording site within different spatial scales) using generalized linear mixed-effects models with a negative binomial distribution. We found a species-specific response of bats to street lamps with and without UV light, providing a more detailed picture of ALAN impacts than simply total light radiance. Moreover, we found that dense tree cover dampened the negative effect of street lamps without UV for open-space foraging bats of the genera Nyctalus, Eptesicus, and Vespertilio, yet it amplified the already existing negative or positive effect of street lamps with or without UV on Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus, and Myotis spp. Our study underpins the importance of minimizing artificial light at night close to vegetation, particularly for bats adapted to spatial complexity in the environment (i.e., clutter-adapted species), and to increase dense vegetation in urban landscape to provide, besides roosting opportunities, protection against ALAN for open-space foraging bats in city landscapes.
Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ intern @ Serial 2302
Permanent link to this record