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Author Caorsi, V.; Sprau, P.; Zollinger, S.A.; Brumm, H.
Title Nocturnal resting behaviour in urban great tits and its relation to anthropogenic disturbance and microclimate Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 73 Issue 2 Pages (up)
Keywords Animals
Abstract The ecological novelty of urbanisation poses many challenges to animals. We investigated whether anthropogenic disturbance (artificial light at night and noise) and abiotic factors in cities (temperature and humidity) predict nocturnal activity and rest in free-living urban great tits (Parus major). Our study is the first to relate nocturnal rest in wild birds to levels of noise pollution during the night, an issue that has been shown to be particularly damaging to human health. Unlike previous work on nocturnal behaviour of urban birds, we considered the combined effect of anthropogenic disturbance and urban microclimate to acknowledge that the umwelt of an animal is composed of multiple environmental variables. Using infrared cameras, we observed the nocturnal resting behaviour as a proxy for sleep in 17 birds in nest boxes deployed across the city of Munich, Germany. Although we found marked differences in resting behaviour between individuals, this variation was not related to the measured environmental factors. This finding contrasts earlier studies that reported nocturnal resting behaviour of birds to vary with temperature and light exposure. Although we did not find evidence that urban environmental factors disrupt resting behaviour in great tits, their sleep might still be impaired by the anthropogenic disturbances. To elucidate this issue, further studies are necessary that, for instance, measure brain activity.
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ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2185
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Author Cronin, A.D.; Ryan, M.J.; Page, R.A.; Hunter, K.L.; Taylor, R.C.
Title Environmental heterogeneity alters mate choice behavior for multimodal signals Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 73 Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Animals
Abstract nimals frequently experience changes in their environment, including diel and seasonal shifts in abiotic and biotic factors. In addition to physiological and morphological changes, animals alter their behavior in response to environmental variation. This study examined the impacts of heterogeneous environments on mating behaviors. We examined both male and female túngara frog phonotactic responses to multimodal (audiovisual) and unimodal (acoustic) stimuli. We altered aspects of the physical environment by changing substrate (terrestrial and aquatic) and ambient light levels. Females demonstrated a similar preference for the audiovisual stimulus regardless of substrate but decreased latency to choose in an aquatic environment. When ambient light levels were increased (relative to darker control), females reversed their preference, avoiding the multimodal stimulus, but the latency to choose was unchanged. Males demonstrated no preference for the multimodal signal on either substrate, but like females, male latency was reduced in an aquatic environment. Different environments carry their own associated costs, including varying levels of predation risk. Increased light levels and an aquatic environment likely carry higher predation risk and therefore should lead to changes in female and male responses. Interestingly, these two environments do not cause uniform changes in female responses. The addition of an aquatic environment led to a reduction in latency, whereas an increase in ambient light levels induced a change in female mate preference. These findings demonstrate the importance of the environment on mating responses to multimodal signals.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2262
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Author Welbers, A.A.M.H.; van Dis, N.E.; Kolvoort, A.M.; Ouyang, J.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.; Dominoni, D.M.
Title Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily Energy Expenditure in Breeding Great Tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Front. Ecol. Evol.
Volume 5 Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Animals
Abstract The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly recognized process that accompanies expanding urbanization. Yet, we have limited knowledge on the impact of ALAN on wild species, and on the potential to mitigate any negative effects by using different light sources and colors. In birds, effects of ALAN on activity levels are reported for several species and, hence, their daily energy expenditure (DEE) may be affected. DEE is a potent mediator of life-history trade-offs and fitness and thus an important aspect to consider when examining the potential long-term ecological effects of ALAN. Previous work has suggested that birds exposed to ALAN show higher levels of provisioning and nocturnal activity, suggesting that white ALAN increases DEE. Other factors regulating DEE, such as provisioning behavior and food availability, might also respond to ALAN and thus indirectly affect DEE. We tested the hypothesis that ALAN increases DEE using an experimental setup where four previously unlit transects were illuminated with either white, green, or red LED light, or left dark as a control treatment. This setup was replicated in eight locations across the Netherlands. We measured DEE of our focal species, the great tit (Parus major), using a novel doubly labeled water technique that uses breath rather than blood samples. Contrary to our expectations, birds feeding their offspring under white and green ALAN showed lower DEE compared to birds in the control dark treatment. Differences in chick provisioning activity did not explain this result, as neither visit rates nor daily activity timing was affected by light treatment. However, food availability under white and green light was much higher compared to red light and the dark control. This difference strongly suggests that the lower DEE under white and green ALAN sites is a consequence of higher food availability in these treatments. This result shows that there can be positive, indirect effects of ALAN for breeding song birds which may balance against the negative direct effects shown in previous studies.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-701X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2460
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Author Huffeldt, N.P.
Title Photic Barriers to Poleward Range-shifts Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol
Volume in press Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Animals; biological rhythm; global climate change; phenology; photoperiod; photoreception; range-shift
Abstract With climate warming, organisms are shifting their ranges towards the poles, tracking their optimal thermal environments. Day-length, the driver of daily and annual timing, is, however, fixed by latitude and date. Timing and photoreception mechanisms adapted to ancestral photic environments may restrict range-shift capacity, resulting in photic barriers to range-shifts.
Address Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, 3900 Nuuk, Greenland; Arctic Ecosystem Ecology, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. Electronic address: nph@bios.au.dk
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32473743 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2992
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Author Alquezar, R.D.; Macedo, R.H.; Sierro, J.; Gil, D.
Title Lack of consistent responses to aircraft noise in dawn song timing of bird populations near tropical airports Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 74 Issue 7 Pages (up)
Keywords Animals
Abstract Birds living near airports can reduce the noise interference by advancing their dawn chorus timing and avoiding the start of airport operations. Data supporting this finding come from temperate areas, but little is known from tropical environments, where seasonal variation is lower and biodiversity is higher. Here, we investigated whether 15 tropical bird species are able to advance their dawn song and avoid aircraft noise interference. We sampled dawn song in three airports and three control sites in Brazil, using automated recording units. We found that dawn song times were not globally affected by the exposure to airport noise. Instead, changes were highly variable and species-specific, as dawn song onset was significantly advanced in two and delayed in four species. This large variation in responses was surprising given patterns found in previous studies. Indeed, this is the first time that a significant delay is reported for bird’s dawn song. We explored whether between-species differences in this response could be explained by additional variables (song frequency, degree of urbanity, and noise release), but none of them explained the direction or the strength of the changes. We suggest that earlier airport activity and shorter variations in day length and in twilight duration of tropical areas may be restricting birds’ ability to change dawn song timing. Further studies should consider these differences and analyze to what extent populational declines in noisy areas and the resultant reduced competition for acoustic space may be affecting the changes in dawn chorus onset time.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3017
Permanent link to this record