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Author Voigt, C.C., Scholl, J.M., Bauer, J. et al.
Title Movement responses of common noctule bats to the illuminated urban landscape Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 35 Issue Pages 189-201
Keywords Animals
Abstract Context

Cities are a challenging habitat for obligate nocturnal mammals because of the ubiquitous use of artificial light at night (ALAN). How nocturnal animals move in an urban landscape, particularly in response to ALAN is largely unknown.

Objectives

We studied the movement responses, foraging and commuting, of common noctules (Nyctalus noctula) to urban landscape features in general and ALAN in particular.

Methods

We equipped 20 bats with miniaturized GPS loggers in the Berlin metropolitan area and related spatial positions of bats to anthropogenic and natural landscape features and levels of ALAN.

Results

Common noctules foraged close to ALAN only next to bodies of water or well vegetated areas, probably to exploit swarms of insects lured by street lights. In contrast, they avoided illuminated roads, irrespective of vegetation cover nearby. Predictive maps identified most of the metropolitan area as non-favoured by this species because of high levels of impervious surfaces and ALAN. Dark corridors were used by common noctules for commuting and thus likely improved the permeability of the city landscape.

Conclusions

We conclude that the spatial use of common noctules, previously considered to be more tolerant to light than other bats, is largely constrained by ALAN. Our study is the first individual-based GPS tracking study to show sensitive responses of nocturnal wildlife to light pollution. Approaches to protect urban biodiversity need to include ALAN to safeguard the larger network of dark habitats for bats and other nocturnal species in cities.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2961
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Author Dominoni, D.M., Halfwerk, W., Baird, E. et al.
Title Why conservation biology can benefit from sensory ecology Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue Pages 502-511
Keywords Conservation; Animals; Vision
Abstract Global expansion of human activities is associated with the introduction of novel stimuli, such as anthropogenic noise, artificial lights and chemical agents. Progress in documenting the ecological effects of sensory pollutants is weakened by sparse knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these effects. This severely limits our capacity to devise mitigation measures. Here, we integrate knowledge of animal sensory ecology, physiology and life history to articulate three perceptual mechanisms—masking, distracting and misleading—that clearly explain how and why anthropogenic sensory pollutants impact organisms. We then link these three mechanisms to ecological consequences and discuss their implications for conservation. We argue that this framework can reveal the presence of ‘sensory danger zones’, hotspots of conservation concern where sensory pollutants overlap in space and time with an organism’s activity, and foster development of strategic interventions to mitigate the impact of sensory pollutants. Future research that applies this framework will provide critical insight to preserve the natural sensory world.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2972
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Author Gliwicz, Z.M.
Title A Lunar Cycle in Zooplankton Type Journal Article
Year 1986 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology
Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages 883
Keywords Animals
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ISSN (up) 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 420
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Author Holt, C.S.; Waters, T.F.
Title Effect of Light Intensity on the Drift of Stream Invertebrates Type Journal Article
Year 1967 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology
Volume 48 Issue 2 Pages 225
Keywords Animals
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ISSN (up) 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 426
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Author Shima, J.S.; Swearer, S.E.
Title Moonlight enhances growth in larval fish Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Moonlight mediates trophic interactions and shapes the evolution of life-history strategies for nocturnal organisms. Reproductive cycles and important life-history transitions for many marine organisms coincide with moon phases, but few studies consider the effects of moonlight on pelagic larvae at sea. We evaluated effects of moonlight on growth of pelagic larvae of a temperate reef fish using 'master chronologies' of larval growth constructed from age-independent daily increment widths recorded in otoliths of 321 individuals. We found that daily growth rates of fish larvae were enhanced by lunar illumination after controlling for the positive influence of temperature and the negative influence of cloud cover. Collectively, these results indicate that moonlight enhances growth rates of larval fish. This pattern is likely the result of moonlight's combined effects on foraging efficiency and suppression of diel migrations of mesopelagic predators, and has the potential to drive evolution of marine life histories. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN (up) 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30422325 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2059
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