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Author Huffeldt, N.P.
Title Photic Barriers to Poleward Range-shifts Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals; biological rhythm; global climate change; phenology; photoperiod; photoreception; range-shift
Abstract With climate warming, organisms are shifting their ranges towards the poles, tracking their optimal thermal environments. Day-length, the driver of daily and annual timing, is, however, fixed by latitude and date. Timing and photoreception mechanisms adapted to ancestral photic environments may restrict range-shift capacity, resulting in photic barriers to range-shifts.
Address Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, 3900 Nuuk, Greenland; Arctic Ecosystem Ecology, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. Electronic address: nph@bios.au.dk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32473743 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2992
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Carmona-Wagner, E.O.; Hofmann, M.; Kranstauber, B.; Partecke, J.
Title Individual-based measurements of light intensity provide new insights into the effects of artificial light at night on daily rhythms of urban-dwelling songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol
Volume 83 Issue 3 Pages 681–692
Keywords (up) Animals; Biological rhythms; light at night; light loggers; light pollution; night shift; noise; radiotelemetry; sleep disruption; temporal niche; urban sprawl
Abstract Summary

The growing interest in the effects of light pollution on daily and seasonal cycles of animals has led to a boost of research in recent years. In birds, it has been hypothesized that artificial light at night can affect daily aspects of behaviour, but one caveat is the lack of knowledge about the light intensity that wild animals, such as birds, are exposed to during the night.

Organisms have naturally evolved daily rhythms to adapt to the 24-h cycle of day and night, thus, it is important to investigate the potential shifts in daily cycles due to global anthropogenic processes such as urbanization.

We captured adult male European blackbirds (Turdus merula) in one rural forest and two urban sites differing in the degree of anthropogenic disturbance. We tagged these birds with light loggers and simultaneously recorded changes in activity status (active/non-active) through an automated telemetry system. We first analysed the relationship between light at night, weather conditions and date with daily activity onset and end. We then compared activity, light at night exposure and noise levels between weekdays and weekends.

Onset of daily activity was significantly advanced in both urban sites compared to the rural population, while end of daily activity did not vary either among sites. Birds exposed to higher amounts of light in the late night showed earlier onset of activity in the morning, but light at night did not influence end of daily activity. Light exposure at night and onset/end of daily activity timing was not different between weekdays and weekends, but all noise variables were. A strong seasonal effect was detected in both urban and rural populations, such as birds tended to be active earlier in the morning and later in the evening (relative to civil twilight) in the early breeding season than at later stages.

Our results point at artificial light at night as a major driver of change in timing of daily activity. Future research should focus on the costs and benefits of altered daily rhythmicity in birds thriving in urban areas.
Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Am Obstberg 1, 78315, Radolfzell, Germany; Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, Universitatsstrasse 10, 78464, Konstanz, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24102250 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 375
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Author Horton, K.G.; Nilsson, C.; Van Doren, B.M.; La Sorte, F.A.; Dokter, A.M.; Farnsworth, A.
Title Bright lights in the big cities: migratory birds’ exposure to artificial light Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Front Ecol Environ
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 209-214
Keywords (up) Animals; Birds; migratory birds
Abstract Many species of migratory birds have evolved the ability to migrate at night, and the recent and rapid expansion of artificial light at night has markedly altered the nighttime sky through which they travel. Migrating birds regularly pass through heavily illuminated landscapes, and bright lights affect avian orientation. But risks to migrating birds from artificial light are not spatially or temporally uniform, representing a challenge for mitigating potential hazards and developing action plans to catalog risks at continental scales. We leveraged over two decades of remote‐sensing data collected by weather surveillance radar and satellite‐based sensors to identify locations and times of year when the highest numbers of migrating birds are exposed to light pollution in the contiguous US. Our continental‐scale quantification of light exposure provides a novel opportunity for dynamic and targeted conservation strategies to address the hazards posed by light pollution to nocturnally migrating birds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2285
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Author Rivas, M.L.; Santidrián Tomillo, P.; Diéguez Uribeondo, J.; Marco, A.
Title Leatherback hatchling sea-finding in response to artificial lighting: Interaction between wavelength and moonlight Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal J of Experim Marine Biol & Ecol
Volume 463 Issue Pages 143-149
Keywords (up) Animals; Costa Rica; conservation; misorientation; light pollution; sea turtles; tourist development; Leatherback turtle; Dermochelys coriacea
Abstract Over the last decades, growing human populations have led to the rising occupation of coastal areas over the globe causing light pollution. For this reason, it is important to assess how this impact threatens endangered wildlife. Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) face many threats of anthropogenic origin including light pollution on nesting beaches. However, little is known about the specific effects. In this study we studied the effect of different light wavelengths (orange, red, blue, green, yellow and white lights) on hatchling orientation under the presence and absence of moonlight by analyzing: (i) the mean angle of orientation, (ii) crawling duration, and (iii) track patterns.

Hatchling orientation towards the sea was always better under controlled conditions. In the absence of moonlight, leatherback hatchlings were phototaxically attracted to the experimental focus of light (misoriented) for the colours blue, green, yellow and white lights. Orange and red lights caused a lower misorientation than other colors, and orange lights produced the lowest disrupted orientation (disorientation). On nights when moonlight was present, hatchlings were misorientated under blue and white artificial lights. Crawling duration was low for misoriented hatchlings and high for the disoriented individuals. Our conclusion to this is that hatchlings can detect and be impacted by a wide range of the light spectrum and we recommend avoiding the presence of artificial lights on nesting beaches. Additionally, actions to control and mitigate artificial lighting are especially important during dark nights when moonlight is absent.
Address University of Granada, Campus Fuentenueva s/n. Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1083
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Author Zachary M. Cravens, Veronica A. Brown, Timothy J. Divoll, Justin G. Boyles
Title Illuminating prey selection in an insectivorous bat community, exposed to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 55 Issue 2 Pages 705-713
Keywords (up) Animals; Ecology
Abstract 1.Light pollution has been increasing around the globe and threatens to disturb natural rhythms of wildlife species. Artificial light impacts the behaviour of insectivorous bats in numerous ways, including foraging behaviour, which may in turn lead to altered prey selection.

2.In a manipulative field experiment, we collected faecal samples from six species of insectivorous bats in naturally dark and artificially lit conditions, and identified prey items using molecular methods to investigate effects of light pollution on prey selection.

3.Proportional differences of identified prey were not consistent and appeared to be species specific. Red bats, little brown bats, and gray bats exhibited expected increases in moths at lit sites. Beetle-specialist big brown bats had a sizeable increase in beetle consumption around lights, while tri-colored bats and evening bats showed little change in moth consumption between experimental conditions. Dietary overlap was high between experimental conditions within each species, and dietary breadth only changed significantly between experimental conditions in one species, the little brown bat.

4.Policy implications. Our results, building on others, demonstrate that bat-insect interactions may be more nuanced than the common assertion that moth consumption increases around lights. They highlight the need for a greater mechanistic understanding of bat-light interactions to predict which species will be most affected by light pollution. Given differences in bat and insect communities, we advocate biologists, land stewards, and civil planners work collaboratively to determine lighting solutions that minimize changes in foraging behaviour of species in the local bat community. Such efforts may allow stakeholders to more effectively craft management strategies to minimize unnatural shifts in prey selection caused by artificial lights.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1783
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