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Author Alldredge, A.L.; King, J.M.
Title (up) Effects of moonlight on the vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton Type Journal Article
Year 1980 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 44 Issue 2 Pages 133-156
Keywords Animals
Abstract The diel vertical migration patterns of demersal zooplankton, those organisms which habit bottom substrates but periodically emerge to swim freely in the water column, water determined throughout the lunar cycle. Demersal zooplankton were quantitatively sampled on a subtidal sand flat in the Gulf of California every 2 h for 24-h periods at new, full, first, and last-quarter moons, both as they emerged into the water column and as they returned to the benthos. Demersal zooplankton rarely migrated during daylight. Three general patterns of migration were observed. (1) Polychaetes and cumaceans emerged from the benthos at dusk, regardless of the phase of the moon. Polychaetes returned to the benthos throughout the night while cumaceans returned near dawn. (2) Species of amphipods and isopods exhibited significant avoidance of moonlight, delaying emergence until moonset or returning to the benthos at moonrise. (3) Species of copepods, mysids, shrimp, Branchiostoma (cephalochordate), and tanaids emerged into the water column throughout the night. The timing of migration was highly variable and did not correlate with the presence or absence of moonlight. Large zooplankton migrated less frequently into the water column during moonlit periods than small forms, suggesting that nocturnal predation by visually oriented planktivorous fish may be an important selective pressure.

Demersal zooplankton emerged into artificially darkened emergence traps in significantly higher numbers during daylight and during full and quarter moons than into undarkened control traps, demonstrating that absence of light is a major cue stimulating migration. Reentry traps resting on the bottom captured higher densities of demersal zooplankton than either emergence traps or reentry traps suspended off the bottom. Thus, many demersal zooplankton remain near the bottom, rarely swimming far into the water column. Some trap avoidance was observed and current methods for collecting demersal zooplankton are evaluated. Since most demersal zooplankton remained in the water column only a short time, dispersal, particularly over short distances, may be a major advantage of migratory behavior. Migration facilitates rapid recolonization of disturbed or defaunated sites, disrupts and mixes bottom sediments, and results in daily variation in the microdistribution, patchiness, and species composition of the benthic fauna.
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ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 423
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Author Einfalt, L.M.; Grace, E.J.; Wahl, D.H.
Title (up) Effects of simulated light intensity, habitat complexity and forage type on predator–prey interactions in walleye Sander vitreus Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Ecology of Freshwater Fish Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue 4 Pages 560–569
Keywords Animals; habitat; light intensity; predator–prey interactions; walleye
Abstract Predator-prey interactions can be influenced by the behaviour of individual species as well as environmental factors. We conducted laboratory experiments to test for the influences of two abiotic factors (light intensity and habitat complexity) on predator–prey interactions between walleye Sander vitreus and two prey species, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas. Three light intensities were simulated (day, twilight and night) in the presence or absence of simulated vegetation. Observations of predator behaviour indicated that walleye increased activity and foraging success with decreasing light levels and had most success capturing dispersed, closer prey. While schooling could not be maintained as light levels diminished, prey decreased predation vulnerability by moving into vegetation or higher in the water column. Throughout all treatments, bluegill were more evasive to capture as the number of strikes was similar on both prey but capture rates were higher for golden shiner. Although light intensity and simulated habitat complexity affected predator and prey behaviour, these factors did not interact to influence foraging success of walleye. To fully understand predator and prey behaviours in fishes, an understanding of species-specific responses to abiotic and biotic factors is necessary.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 388
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Author Bolliger, J.; Hennet, T.; Wermelinger, B.; Bösch, R.; Pazur, R.; Blum, S.; Haller, J.; Obrist, M.K.
Title (up) Effects of traffic-regulated street lighting on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract New technological developments modulate the light levels of LED street luminaires according to traffic volumes: light levels are increased given traffic and reduced in its absence. Such dimming of street lights reduces the level of artificial light at night (ALAN) and may thus contribute to mitigate light pollution. To quantify the impact of traffic-driven dimming of street lights on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity in comparison to full light (i.e., dimming functions of luminaires switched off), we mounted 20 insect flight-interception traps and ten batloggers on street light poles along two dimmable street light sections. Insect abundance and bat activity were measured alternately with one week of full street lighting followed by a week with light levels modulated by traffic volumes. In total, 16 dimmed and 16 full-light days were investigated. Overall, traffic-driven dimming reduced light levels by 35%. Weather conditions (warm, dry nights) were the main drivers of insect abundance and bat activity, but traffic-driven dimming resulted in lower numbers of insects caught and reduced bat activity. Among insect groups, Heteroptera benefited most from dimming. For bats, urban exploiters (Pipistrellus spp.) benefited from increased availability of prey at brightly lit street lights, while less frequent species (Myotis spp.) did not benefit from street lighting. We conclude that street light dimming technology may contribute to mitigate negative effects of ALAN on nocturnal organisms, although the measure may not be efficient enough to support light-sensitive and threatened species.
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ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3027
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Author Cronin, A.D.; Ryan, M.J.; Page, R.A.; Hunter, K.L.; Taylor, R.C.
Title (up) Environmental heterogeneity alters mate choice behavior for multimodal signals Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 73 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract nimals frequently experience changes in their environment, including diel and seasonal shifts in abiotic and biotic factors. In addition to physiological and morphological changes, animals alter their behavior in response to environmental variation. This study examined the impacts of heterogeneous environments on mating behaviors. We examined both male and female túngara frog phonotactic responses to multimodal (audiovisual) and unimodal (acoustic) stimuli. We altered aspects of the physical environment by changing substrate (terrestrial and aquatic) and ambient light levels. Females demonstrated a similar preference for the audiovisual stimulus regardless of substrate but decreased latency to choose in an aquatic environment. When ambient light levels were increased (relative to darker control), females reversed their preference, avoiding the multimodal stimulus, but the latency to choose was unchanged. Males demonstrated no preference for the multimodal signal on either substrate, but like females, male latency was reduced in an aquatic environment. Different environments carry their own associated costs, including varying levels of predation risk. Increased light levels and an aquatic environment likely carry higher predation risk and therefore should lead to changes in female and male responses. Interestingly, these two environments do not cause uniform changes in female responses. The addition of an aquatic environment led to a reduction in latency, whereas an increase in ambient light levels induced a change in female mate preference. These findings demonstrate the importance of the environment on mating responses to multimodal signals.
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ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2262
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Author Wakefield, A.; Broyles, M.; Stone, E.L.; Jones, G.; Harris, S.
Title (up) Experimentally comparing the attractiveness of domestic lights to insects: Do LEDs attract fewer insects than conventional light types? Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol
Volume 6 Issue 22 Pages 8028-8036
Keywords ecology; Lighting
Abstract LED lighting is predicted to constitute 70% of the outdoor and residential lighting markets by 2020. While the use of LEDs promotes energy and cost savings relative to traditional lighting technologies, little is known about the effects these broad-spectrum “white” lights will have on wildlife, human health, animal welfare, and disease transmission. We conducted field experiments to compare the relative attractiveness of four commercially available “domestic” lights, one traditional (tungsten filament) and three modern (compact fluorescent, “cool-white” LED and “warm-white” LED), to aerial insects, particularly Diptera. We found that LEDs attracted significantly fewer insects than other light sources, but found no significant difference in attraction between the “cool-” and “warm-white” LEDs. Fewer flies were attracted to LEDs than alternate light sources, including fewer Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Use of LEDs has the potential to mitigate disturbances to wildlife and occurrences of insect-borne diseases relative to competing lighting technologies. However, we discuss the risks associated with broad-spectrum lighting and net increases in lighting resulting from reduced costs of LED technology.
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ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1541
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