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Author Himangshu Dutta url  openurl
  Title Insights into the impacts of four current environmental problems on flying birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Energy, Ecology and Environment Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 329–349  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A wide variety of substances and agents are released into the atmosphere due to anthropogenic activities. Higher levels of such entities have given rise to four major environmental problems: air, light and noise pollution and global warming, all of which severely affect birds and other animals. These four issues have been overlooked, although climate change is receiving increasing attention. The four challenges often occur simultaneously and are likely to exert composite impacts. Most studies have focused on the effects of a specific problem at a particular time and have never taken into account their cumulative consequences. This review tries to address this shortcoming. It aims to evaluate the composite impacts of the problems on flying birds beyond an understanding of their individual impacts. The review initially sheds light on the individual impacts based on existing scientific literature. Composite impacts were then estimated by assigning suitable scores to the literature to convert it into empirical data. Scores were then analysed. Through this assessment, it was found that the health of birds is highly vulnerable to the composite effects of the problems. Additionally, statistical analysis revealed that the effects of all problems on different aspects of avian biology are likely to be magnified simultaneously in the future. Thus, the impact of these problems on birds should not be neglected, and further studies should be conducted to understand their mechanisms.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1744  
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Author Voigt, C.C., Scholl, J.M., Bauer, J. et al. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Movement responses of common noctule bats to the illuminated urban landscape Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 189-201  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Context

Cities are a challenging habitat for obligate nocturnal mammals because of the ubiquitous use of artificial light at night (ALAN). How nocturnal animals move in an urban landscape, particularly in response to ALAN is largely unknown.

Objectives

We studied the movement responses, foraging and commuting, of common noctules (Nyctalus noctula) to urban landscape features in general and ALAN in particular.

Methods

We equipped 20 bats with miniaturized GPS loggers in the Berlin metropolitan area and related spatial positions of bats to anthropogenic and natural landscape features and levels of ALAN.

Results

Common noctules foraged close to ALAN only next to bodies of water or well vegetated areas, probably to exploit swarms of insects lured by street lights. In contrast, they avoided illuminated roads, irrespective of vegetation cover nearby. Predictive maps identified most of the metropolitan area as non-favoured by this species because of high levels of impervious surfaces and ALAN. Dark corridors were used by common noctules for commuting and thus likely improved the permeability of the city landscape.

Conclusions

We conclude that the spatial use of common noctules, previously considered to be more tolerant to light than other bats, is largely constrained by ALAN. Our study is the first individual-based GPS tracking study to show sensitive responses of nocturnal wildlife to light pollution. Approaches to protect urban biodiversity need to include ALAN to safeguard the larger network of dark habitats for bats and other nocturnal species in cities.
 
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2961  
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Author Laforge, A., Pauwels, J., Faure, B., Bas, Y., Kerbiriou, C., Fonderflick, J., & Besnard, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reducing light pollution improves connectivity for bats in urban landscapes Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-17  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Context

Light pollution can alter animal movements and landscape connectivity. This is particularly true in urban landscapes where a need to incorporate conservation issues in urban planning is urgent.

Objectives

We investigated how potential light-reduction scenarios at conurbation scale change landscape connectivity for bats.

Methods

Through random stratified sampling and species distribution modelling, we assessed the relative importance of light pollution on bat presence probability and activity. We recorded bats during one entire night on each 305 sampling points in 2015. In 2016, we surveyed 94 supplementary points to evaluate models performance. We used our spatial predictions to characterize landscape resistance to bat movements. Then we applied a least-cost modelling approach to identify nocturnal corridors and estimated the impact of five light-reduction scenarios on landscape connectivity for two light non-tolerant bat species.

Results

We found that light pollution detected from satellite images was a good predictor of bat presence and activity up to 700 m radius. Our results exhibited contrasting responses to average radiance: M. daubentonii responded negatively, P. nathusii had a positive response for low values then a negative response after a threshold radiance value of 20 W.m−2.sr−1 and E. serotinus responded positively. Five and four light-reduction scenarios significantly improved landscape connectivity for M. daubentonii and P. nathusii respectively.

Conclusions

Light-reduction measures should be included in urban planning to provide sustainable conditions for bats in cities. We advocate for the use of our methodological approach to further studies to find the best trade-off between conservation needs and social acceptability.
 
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2345  
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Holt, L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nature, extent and ecological implications of night‐time light from road vehicles Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 55 Issue 5 Pages 2296-2307  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; Lighting; Review  
  Abstract The erosion of night‐time by the introduction of artificial lighting constitutes a profound pressure on the natural environment. It has altered what had for millennia been reliable signals from natural light cycles used for regulating a host of biological processes, with impacts ranging from changes in gene expression to ecosystem processes.

Studies of these impacts have focused almost exclusively on those resulting from stationary sources of light emissions, and particularly streetlights. However, mobile sources, especially road vehicle headlights, contribute substantial additional emissions.

The ecological impacts of light emissions from vehicle headlights are likely to be especially high because these are (1) focused so as to light roadsides at higher intensities than commonly experienced from other sources, and well above activation thresholds for many biological processes; (2) projected largely in a horizontal plane and thus can carry over long distances; (3) introduced into much larger areas of the landscape than experience street lighting; (4) typically broad “white” spectrum, which substantially overlaps the action spectra of many biological processes and (5) often experienced at roadsides as series of pulses of light (produced by passage of vehicles), a dynamic known to have major biological impacts.

The ecological impacts of road vehicle headlights will markedly increase with projected global growth in numbers of vehicles and the road network, increasing the local severity of emissions (because vehicle numbers are increasing faster than growth in the road network) and introducing emissions into areas from which they were previously absent. The effects will be further exacerbated by technological developments that are increasing the intensity of headlight emissions and the amounts of blue light in emission spectra.

Synthesis and applications. Emissions from vehicle headlights need to be considered as a major, and growing, source of ecological impacts of artificial night‐time lighting. It will be a significant challenge to minimise these impacts whilst balancing drivers' needs at night and avoiding risk and discomfort for other road users. Nonetheless, there is potential to identify solutions to these conflicts, both through the design of headlights and that of roads.
 
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1841  
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Author Girard, M.B.; Kasumovic, M.M.; Elias, D.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of red coloration and song in peacock spider courtship: insights into complex signaling systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Research on animal signaling enhances our understanding of links between sensory processing, decision making, behavior, and evolution. Studies of sexually-selected signals may be particularly informative as mate choice provides access to decision patterns in the way that courtship leads to an easily observable behavioral output in choosers, i.e., mating. Male peacock spiders have some of the most elaborate and varied courtship displays known among animals. Particularly striking to human observers is the diversity of red, orange, and yellow ornaments that males exhibit across the genus. The primary objective of our research was to investigate how these visual ornaments interact with vibratory songs to affect female mating behavior of one species, Maratus volans. Accordingly, we conducted mating trials under a series of experimentally manipulated vibratory and lighting conditions. Contrary to expectation, chromatic characteristics of longer wavelength ornaments are not driving female mate choice decisions, despite their extensive presence on male fans. Instead, our results suggest that contrast is important to females. Additionally, we found that vibratory signals were not necessary and did not increase mating rates. Our study demonstrates the intricacies inherent in complex signaling systems.  
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  ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2027  
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