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Author Frank, T. M., Gabbert, W. C., Chaves-Campos, J., & LaVal, R. K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of artificial lights on foraging of insectivorous bats in a Costa Rican cloud forest Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Tropical Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 8-17  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Determining the effects of light pollution on tropical bat communities is important for understanding community assembly rules in urban areas. Studies from temperate regions suggest that, among aerial insectivorous bats, fast-flying species that forage in the open are attracted to artificial lights, whereas slow-flying species that forage in cluttered environments avoid those lights. We measured aerial insectivore responses to light pollution in a tropical cloud forest to test this hypothesis. Bat echolocation was recorded at 20 pairs of light and dark sites in Monteverde, Costa Rica. Foraging activity was higher at artificially lighted sites than dark sites near the new moon, especially around blue-white fluorescent lighting. Most recorded bat species showed increased or unchanged activity in response to light, including some slow-flying and edge-foraging bats. This finding suggests that, contrary to the evaluated hypothesis, flight speed and foraging mode are not sufficient to determine bat responses to artificial lights in the tropics. Two bat species showed decreased activity at light sites, and a low species evenness was recorded around lights, particularly fluorescent lights, compared with dark sites. As in the temperate zone, light pollution in the tropics seems to concentrate certain bat species around human-inhabited areas, potentially shifting community structure.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2311  
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Author Nankoo, S.; Raymond, S.; Galvez-Cloutier, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of the Jacques Cartier bridge illumination on the food chain: from insects to predators Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Community Ecology Abbreviated Journal Community Ecology  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 172-180  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night can impact numerous diurnal species by influencing their distribution and habits. In this study, artificial lights placed on the Jacques Cartier bridge in Montreal, Canada were evaluated to determine their impact on insects, insectivorous birds and peregrine falcons. The impact was measured the year the illumination begun and the year following (two years in total). Insect distribution and abundance at three different sites around the bridge was measured. Insectivorous bird abundance and activity were evaluated by observing the cliff swallow as a proxy. Peregrine falcon presence and nesting behavior at the bridge was measured. Insects (aerial and aquatic) were found to be more abundant closer to the illuminated part of the bridge and particularly in the year following the illumination's beginning. Similarly, cliff swallows were more abundant at the bridge the year following the start of the illumination and their activity was more important closer to the illuminated section. Peregrine falcons were only present at the bridge in the year following the beginning of the illumination and specifically at the illuminated part of the bridge. No nesting was detected. These three groups are connected to each other through a food chain in which insect abundance impacts insectivorous bird abundance, which in turn impacts peregrine falcon presence. The illumination therefore positively impacts these three groups separately and together through their food chain. This research highlights the importance of monitoring bird and insect population close to the bridge and further continuation of these observations are necessary to determine if the observed tendency will continue to develop throughout the years.  
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  ISSN 1585-8553 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2705  
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Author Pushkala, K., Gupta, P. D., & Geetha, R. url  openurl
  Title Differential Drift in Menarcheal Age in Blind and Sighted Girls Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Gynaecology and Perinatology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 4 Pages 333-339  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Our survey data show that menarcheal age, both in sighted and blind girls has drifted towards younger years compared to 50 years back, however, in sighted girls it has gone further down compared to blind girls. In this paper we have explained the reasons, why it is so? For the comparison sake we were very careful to select sighted and blind girls from the same geographical region, socio-economical and education status and food habits. Taking into consideration, our earlier hypothesis, “blind women and breast cancer”, here also we propose that only the photo regulatory system for hormonal axis is responsible for differential lowering of Menarcheal age in sighted and blind girls, since all other regulatory factors are same in both the groups.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2320  
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Author Cammaerts, M. C., & Cammaerts, R. url  openurl
  Title Effect of nocturnal lighting on an ant’s ethological and physiological traits Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication MOJ Ecology & Environmental Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue 5 Pages 211-218  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial nocturnal lighting affects the nature, an impact best studied on vertebrates that are directly depending on the presence or absence of light. Here, we examined on an ant species taken as a model the effects of artificial nocturnal lighting on eleven physiological and ethological traits. Ant workers maintained under nocturnal lighting showed a decrease or a change in their level of activity, food consumption, locomotion, orientation ability, audacity, tactile perception, social relationship, learning and memory. This was largely observed during the night but the effects persisted, at a lower extend, during the day  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2735  
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Author Portugal, S. J., White, C. R., Frappell, P. B.m Green, J. A., & Butler, P. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impacts of “supermoon” events on the physiology of a wild bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 7974-7984  
  Keywords Animals; Moonlight  
  Abstract The position of the Moon in relation to the Earth and the Sun gives rise to several predictable cycles, and natural changes in nighttime light intensity are known to cause alterations to physiological processes and behaviors in many animals. The limited research undertaken to date on the physiological responses of animals to the lunar illumination has exclusively focused on the synodic lunar cycle (full moon to full moon, or moon phase) but the moon's orbit—its distance from the Earth—may also be relevant. Every month, the moon moves from apogee, its most distant point from Earth—and then to perigee, its closest point to Earth. Here, we studied wild barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) to investigate the influence of multiple interacting lunar cycles on the physiology of diurnally active animals. Our study, which uses biologging technology to continually monitor body temperature and heart rate for an entire annual cycle, asks whether there is evidence for a physiological response to natural cycles in lunar brightness in wild birds, particularly “supermoon” phenomena, where perigee coincides with a full moon. There was a three‐way interaction between lunar phase, lunar distance, and cloud cover as predictors of nighttime mean body

temperature, such that body temperature was highest on clear nights when the full

moon coincided with perigee moon. Our study is the first to report the physiological responses of wild birds to “supermoon” events; the wild geese responded to the combination of two independent lunar cycles, by significantly increasing their body temperature at night. That wild birds respond to natural fluctuations in nighttime ambient light levels support the documented responses of many species to anthropogenic sources of artificial light, that birds seem unable to override. As most biological systems are arguably organized foremost by light, this suggests that any interactions between lunar cycles and local weather conditions could have significant impacts on the energy budgets of birds.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2628  
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