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Author Abd Mutalib, A.H.; Fadzly, N.; Ahmad, A.; Nasir, N.
Title Understanding nesting ecology and behaviour of green marine turtles at Setiu, Terengganu, Malaysia Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Marine Ecology Abbreviated Journal Mar Ecol
Volume (down) 36 Issue 4 Pages 1003-1012
Keywords Chelonia mydas; conservation; green turtles; nesting behaviour; nesting ecology; sea turtles; reptiles; marine reptiles; verterbrates; ecology; Sea turtle conservation; Setiu; Malaysia
Abstract In this paper, we emphasize the importance of understanding the nesting ecology and nesting behaviour of green marine turtles (Chelonia mydas). Data were collected from 2007 until 2012 from nesting beaches at Setiu Terengganu, Malaysia. We focused on one of the beaches, Telaga Papan, based on data collected in 2012. We recorded the distribution of nesting areas, the emergence hour and the correlation between successful nesting attempts and false crawls. Telaga Papan had a significantly higher distribution of green marine turtle nesting compared with the other five beaches (ANOVA, F5,42 = 8.874, P < 0.01, mean = 36.750 ± 3.727). The highest number of successful nesting attempts was recorded in 2012 (mean = 28.714). A majority of the species landed between 22:00 and 23:59 h (25%). There was a strong correlation between successful nesting attempts and false crawls (rs = 0.883, P = 0.02). Based on these findings on the nesting ecology and nesting behaviour of green marine turtles, we suggest that scientific research, strict monitoring, awareness programs and policy implementation should be carried out proactively. Such activities are necessary to reduce the anthropogenic pressures at the nesting beaches as well as to ensure more successful nesting attempts of green marine turtles in Setiu.
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ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 369
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Author Frank, T. M., Gabbert, W. C., Chaves-Campos, J., & LaVal, R. K.
Title Impact of artificial lights on foraging of insectivorous bats in a Costa Rican cloud forest Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Tropical Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 35 Issue 1 Pages 8-17
Keywords Animals
Abstract Determining the effects of light pollution on tropical bat communities is important for understanding community assembly rules in urban areas. Studies from temperate regions suggest that, among aerial insectivorous bats, fast-flying species that forage in the open are attracted to artificial lights, whereas slow-flying species that forage in cluttered environments avoid those lights. We measured aerial insectivore responses to light pollution in a tropical cloud forest to test this hypothesis. Bat echolocation was recorded at 20 pairs of light and dark sites in Monteverde, Costa Rica. Foraging activity was higher at artificially lighted sites than dark sites near the new moon, especially around blue-white fluorescent lighting. Most recorded bat species showed increased or unchanged activity in response to light, including some slow-flying and edge-foraging bats. This finding suggests that, contrary to the evaluated hypothesis, flight speed and foraging mode are not sufficient to determine bat responses to artificial lights in the tropics. Two bat species showed decreased activity at light sites, and a low species evenness was recorded around lights, particularly fluorescent lights, compared with dark sites. As in the temperate zone, light pollution in the tropics seems to concentrate certain bat species around human-inhabited areas, potentially shifting community structure.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2311
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Author Voigt, C.C., Scholl, J.M., Bauer, J. et al.
Title Movement responses of common noctule bats to the illuminated urban landscape Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 35 Issue Pages 189-201
Keywords Animals
Abstract Context

Cities are a challenging habitat for obligate nocturnal mammals because of the ubiquitous use of artificial light at night (ALAN). How nocturnal animals move in an urban landscape, particularly in response to ALAN is largely unknown.

Objectives

We studied the movement responses, foraging and commuting, of common noctules (Nyctalus noctula) to urban landscape features in general and ALAN in particular.

Methods

We equipped 20 bats with miniaturized GPS loggers in the Berlin metropolitan area and related spatial positions of bats to anthropogenic and natural landscape features and levels of ALAN.

Results

Common noctules foraged close to ALAN only next to bodies of water or well vegetated areas, probably to exploit swarms of insects lured by street lights. In contrast, they avoided illuminated roads, irrespective of vegetation cover nearby. Predictive maps identified most of the metropolitan area as non-favoured by this species because of high levels of impervious surfaces and ALAN. Dark corridors were used by common noctules for commuting and thus likely improved the permeability of the city landscape.

Conclusions

We conclude that the spatial use of common noctules, previously considered to be more tolerant to light than other bats, is largely constrained by ALAN. Our study is the first individual-based GPS tracking study to show sensitive responses of nocturnal wildlife to light pollution. Approaches to protect urban biodiversity need to include ALAN to safeguard the larger network of dark habitats for bats and other nocturnal species in cities.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2961
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Author Peng, J.; Lin, H.; Chen, Y.; Blaschke, T.; Luo, L.; Xu, Z.; Hu, Y.’na; Zhao, M.; Wu, J.
Title Spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations in China during 2000–2012: a nighttime light approach Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol
Volume (down) 35 Issue 2 Pages 421-434
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Context

Urban agglomeration is an advanced spatial organization of cities, usually caused by urbanization processes when cities develop to a certain level – typically associated with higher population density and a certain density of built environment. However, compared with various studies focusing on specific cities, urban agglomerations are still understudied, especially for the quantitative identification of spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.

Objectives

This study aims to identify the boundary of urban agglomerations in China from 2000 to 2012, and to explore the temporal evolution and spatial difference of urban agglomerations.

Methods

Firstly, the core zone of urban agglomerations was identified using an appropriate threshold of the digital number (DN) of nighttime light. Secondly, the mean patch area and gravity model were used to determine the affected zone of urban agglomerations. Thirdly, spatiotemporal contrast was conducted focusing on the 23 main urban agglomerations in China.

Results

By 2012, the most highly developed Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta urban agglomerations met the standard of world level, with the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei urban agglomeration for regional level, as well as 11 urban agglomerations for sub-regional level. Regional differences in urban agglomerations between southern and northern China, or between coastal and inland China remained stable over the study period of 2000–2012. Compared with the western urban agglomerations, the outward expansion of eastern urban agglomerations decelerated. From 2000 to 2012, the overall development mode of urban agglomerations shifted from the core-expansion to the peripheral-development, together with slower expansion of urban agglomerations after 2006.

Conclusions

Nighttime light data are effective in exploring the spatiotemporal evolution of urban agglomerations.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3131
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Author Buxton, R.T.; Seymoure, B.M.; White, J.; Angeloni, L.M.; Crooks, K.R.; Fristrup, K.; McKenna, M.F.; Wittemyer, G.
Title The relationship between anthropogenic light and noise in U.S. national parks Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol
Volume (down) 35 Issue 6 Pages 1371-1384
Keywords Remote Sensing; Conservation; Skyglow
Abstract Context

Natural sound and light regulate fundamental biological processes and are central to visitor experience in protected areas. As such, anthropogenic light and noise have negative effects on both wildlife and humans. While prior studies have examined the distribution and levels of light or noise, joint analyses are rarely undertaken despite their potentially cumulative effects.

Objectives

We examine the relationship between different types of anthropogenic light and noise conditions and what factors drive correlation, co-occurrences, and divergence between them.

Methods

We overlaid existing geospatial models of anthropogenic light and noise with landscape predictors in national parks across the continental U.S.

Results

Overlapping dark and quiet were the most common conditions (82.5–87.1% of park area), representing important refuges for wildlife and human experience. We found low correlation between anthropogenic light and noise (Spearman’s R < 0.25), with the exception of parks with a higher density of roads. Park land within urban areas had the highest probability of co-occurring high light and noise exposure, while park areas with divergent light and noise exposure (e.g., high light and low noise) were most commonly found 5–20 km from urban areas and in parks with roads present.

Conclusions

These analyses demonstrate that light and noise exposure are not always correlated in national parks, which was unexpected because human activities tend to produce both simultaneously. As such, mitigation efforts for anthropogenic light and noise will require efforts targeting site-specific sources of noise and light. Protecting and restoring sensory environments will involve constructive partnerships capable of reconciling diverse community interests.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3155
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