|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Zachary M. Cravens, Veronica A. Brown, Timothy J. Divoll, Justin G. Boyles
Title Illuminating prey selection in an insectivorous bat community, exposed to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 55 Issue 2 Pages 705-713
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract 1.Light pollution has been increasing around the globe and threatens to disturb natural rhythms of wildlife species. Artificial light impacts the behaviour of insectivorous bats in numerous ways, including foraging behaviour, which may in turn lead to altered prey selection.

2.In a manipulative field experiment, we collected faecal samples from six species of insectivorous bats in naturally dark and artificially lit conditions, and identified prey items using molecular methods to investigate effects of light pollution on prey selection.

3.Proportional differences of identified prey were not consistent and appeared to be species specific. Red bats, little brown bats, and gray bats exhibited expected increases in moths at lit sites. Beetle-specialist big brown bats had a sizeable increase in beetle consumption around lights, while tri-colored bats and evening bats showed little change in moth consumption between experimental conditions. Dietary overlap was high between experimental conditions within each species, and dietary breadth only changed significantly between experimental conditions in one species, the little brown bat.

4.Policy implications. Our results, building on others, demonstrate that bat-insect interactions may be more nuanced than the common assertion that moth consumption increases around lights. They highlight the need for a greater mechanistic understanding of bat-light interactions to predict which species will be most affected by light pollution. Given differences in bat and insect communities, we advocate biologists, land stewards, and civil planners work collaboratively to determine lighting solutions that minimize changes in foraging behaviour of species in the local bat community. Such efforts may allow stakeholders to more effectively craft management strategies to minimize unnatural shifts in prey selection caused by artificial lights.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1783
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaston, K.J.; Holt, L.A.
Title Nature, extent and ecological implications of night‐time light from road vehicles Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 55 Issue 5 Pages 2296-2307
Keywords Animals; Ecology; Lighting; Review
Abstract The erosion of night‐time by the introduction of artificial lighting constitutes a profound pressure on the natural environment. It has altered what had for millennia been reliable signals from natural light cycles used for regulating a host of biological processes, with impacts ranging from changes in gene expression to ecosystem processes.

Studies of these impacts have focused almost exclusively on those resulting from stationary sources of light emissions, and particularly streetlights. However, mobile sources, especially road vehicle headlights, contribute substantial additional emissions.

The ecological impacts of light emissions from vehicle headlights are likely to be especially high because these are (1) focused so as to light roadsides at higher intensities than commonly experienced from other sources, and well above activation thresholds for many biological processes; (2) projected largely in a horizontal plane and thus can carry over long distances; (3) introduced into much larger areas of the landscape than experience street lighting; (4) typically broad “white” spectrum, which substantially overlaps the action spectra of many biological processes and (5) often experienced at roadsides as series of pulses of light (produced by passage of vehicles), a dynamic known to have major biological impacts.

The ecological impacts of road vehicle headlights will markedly increase with projected global growth in numbers of vehicles and the road network, increasing the local severity of emissions (because vehicle numbers are increasing faster than growth in the road network) and introducing emissions into areas from which they were previously absent. The effects will be further exacerbated by technological developments that are increasing the intensity of headlight emissions and the amounts of blue light in emission spectra.

Synthesis and applications. Emissions from vehicle headlights need to be considered as a major, and growing, source of ecological impacts of artificial night‐time lighting. It will be a significant challenge to minimise these impacts whilst balancing drivers' needs at night and avoiding risk and discomfort for other road users. Nonetheless, there is potential to identify solutions to these conflicts, both through the design of headlights and that of roads.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1841
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cruz, L.M.; Shillinger, G.L.; Robinson, N.J.; Tomillo, P.S.; Paladino, F.V.
Title Effect of light intensity and wavelength on the in-water orientation of olive ridley turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 505 Issue Pages 52-56
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution, associated with coastal development, poses a growing threat to sea turtles. Hatchlings are particularly affected during their crawl to the ocean since they exhibit phototaxis and may move towards or be disoriented by artificial lights. Although much is known about how hatchlings respond to artificial light while crawling to the ocean, far less is known about their response after reaching the water. Here, we investigate how hatchling olive ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) held in artificial pools responded to light of different wavelengths (red, 720 nm; yellow, 660 nm and green, 520 nm) and intensities (0.1–3.3 lx, mean 0.87 lx, SD = 0.85, 10.3–45.9 lx, mean 15.75 lx,SD = 7.12; 47.5–84.2 lx; mean 52.02 lx, SD = 9.11; 91.3–140.8 lx, mean 105 lx, SD = 13.24; 150.1–623 lx, mean 172.18 lx, SD = 73.42). When no light or red light below 39 lx was present, hatchlings oriented at a mean angle of 180° from true north and did not orient towards any discernable feature. However, hatchlings swam towards the light at intensities of red light above 39 lx, yellow light above 10 lx and green light above 5 lx. Our findings indicate that sea turtles will swim towards artificial lights even after reaching the water. Thus, we recommend light mitigation efforts should extend beyond nesting beaches and into the associated oceanic habitats.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1894
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Giraudeau, M.; Sepp, T.; Ujvari, B.; Ewald, P.W.; Thomas, F.
Title Human activities might influence oncogenic processes in wild animal populations Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2018 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume 2 Issue Pages 1065-1070
Keywords Commentary; Animals
Abstract Based on the abundant studies available on humans showing clear associations between rapid environmental changes and the rate of neoplasia, we propose that human activities might increase cancer rate in wild populations through numerous processes. Most of the research on this topic has concentrated on wildlife cancer prevalence in environments that are heavily contaminated with anthropogenic chemicals. Here, we propose that human activities might also increase cancer rate in wild populations through additional processes including light pollution, accidental (for example, human waste) or intentional (for example, bird feeders) wildlife feeding (and the associated change of diet), or reduction of genetic diversity in human-impacted habitats. The human species can thus be defined as an oncogenic species, moderating the environment in the way that it causes cancer in other wild populations. As human impacts on wildlife are predicted to increase rather than decrease (for example, in the context of urbanization), acknowledging the possible links between human activity and cancer in wild populations is crucial.
Address MIVEGEC, Montpellier, France. frederic.thomas2@ird.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29784981 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1921
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wilson, P.; Thums, M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Meekan, M.; Pendoley, K.; Fisher, R.; Whiting, S.
Title Artificial light disrupts the nearshore dispersal of neonate flatback turtles Natator depressus Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 600 Issue Pages 179-192
Keywords Animals
Abstract After emerging from nests, neonate sea turtles entering the water are thought to orientate away from shore using wave cues to guide them out to sea. Artificial light may interfere with this process, but the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic cues to the dispersal of hatchlings is unknown. Here, we used acoustic telemetry to track the movement of flatback turtle (Natator depressus) hatchlings dispersing through nearshore waters. Turtles dispersed in the presence and absence of artificial light through a receiver array where a range of oceanographic variables were measured. Turtle tracks were analysed using a full subsets Generalised Additive Mixed Model approach to identify the most important cues influencing the bearing, variance in bearing (a measure of the ability to orientate directly), rate of travel and time spent in the array. Artificial light reduced their swim speed by up to 30%, increased the amount of time spent in nearshore waters (by 50–150%) and increased the variance in bearing (100–180% more variable), regardless of oceanographic conditions. Under ambient conditions, ocean currents affected the bearing of hatchlings as they left the shore, but when light was present, this effect was diminished, showing turtles actively swam against currents in their attempts to move towards light. After accounting for the effects of currents on hatchlings dispersing under ambient conditions, turtles swam offshore by moving perpendicular to the coastline and did not appear to orient into incident wave direction. Overall, light disrupted the dispersal of hatchlings causing them to linger, become disoriented in the near shore and expend energy swimming against ocean currents.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1967
Permanent link to this record