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Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Tatsumi, S.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Indoor light pollution and progression of carotid atherosclerosis: A longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environment International  
  Volume 133 Issue Pages 105184  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Exposure to light at inappropriate times in relation to the solar cycle can disturb circadian endocrine and metabolic rhythms. Previous studies have suggested an association between light exposure at night (LAN) and obesity, an important risk factor of atherosclerosis, although it remains unclear whether LAN associates with progression of atherosclerosis. To evaluate the longitudinal association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of carotid atherosclerosis, light intensity in the bedroom at baseline and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) at baseline and follow-up were measured in 989 elderly participants (945 at baseline and 780 at a median follow-up time of 34 months). The mean age of the participants was 71.4 ± 6.9 years. The average mean and maximal carotid IMT at baseline were 0.88 ± 0.15 and 1.10 ± 0.32 mm, respectively. The median intensity of bedroom LAN was 0.68 lx (IQR, 0.07–3.29). In multivariable analysis adjusted for potential confounders, the highest LAN group exhibited a significant increase in mean carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.028; 95% CI, 0.005–0.052; P = 0.019) compared with the lowest LAN quartile group. A similar relationship was found between LAN and maximal carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.083; 95% CI, 0.037–0.129; P < 0.001).

In conclusion, we found a clear and significant association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, which was independent of known risk factors for atherosclerosis, including age, obesity, smoking, economic status, hypertension, and diabetes. Indoor light pollution may be a potential risk factor for atherosclerosis in the general population.
 
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  ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2706  
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Author He, C.; Ma, L.; Zhou, L.; Kan, H.D.; Zhang, Y.; Ma, W.C.; Chen, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exploring the mechanisms of heat wave vulnerability at the urban scale based on the application of big data and artificial societies Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int  
  Volume 127 Issue Pages 573-583  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Rapid urbanisation has altered the vulnerability of urban areas to heat wave disasters. There is an urgent need to identify the factors underlying the effect of heat waves on human health and the areas that are most vulnerable to heat waves. In this study, we plan to integrate indices associated with heat wave vulnerability based on meteorological observation data, remote sensing data and point of interest (POI) data; analyse the influence of urbanisation on the urban vulnerability environment; and explore the relationship between the vulnerability environment and heat-wave-related mortality. Finally, we attempt to map the spatial distribution of high heat-wave-related mortality risk based on the results of heat wave vulnerability study and artificial society. The results reveal that 1) there are differences in the influence of urbanisation on heat wave exposure, sensitivity and adaptability; 2) the exposure and sensitivity level effects on the lower limit of health impacts and the adaptability level effects on the upper limit of the health impact from heat wave in a given study area; and 3) areas vulnerable to the effects of heat waves are not confined to the city centre, which implies that residents living in suburban areas are also vulnerable to heat waves. Finally, this study not only explores the factors contributing to the impacts of heat waves but also describes the spatial distribution of the risk of disaster-associated mortality, thereby providing direct scientific guidance that can be used by cities to address heat wave disasters in the future.  
  Address College of System Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China. Electronic address: nudtcb9372@gmail.com  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30986739 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2326  
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Author Mireku, M.O.; Barker, M.M.; Mutz, J.; Dumontheil, I.; Thomas, M.S.C.; Roosli, M.; Elliott, P.; Toledano, M.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-time screen-based media device use and adolescents' sleep and health-related quality of life Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int  
  Volume 124 Issue Pages 66-78  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates the relationship between night-time screen-based media devices (SBMD) use, which refers to use within 1h before sleep, in both lit and dark rooms, and sleep outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among 11 to 12-year-olds. METHODS: We analysed baseline data from a large cohort of 6616 adolescents from 39 schools in and around London, United Kingdom, participating in the Study of Cognition Adolescents and Mobile Phone (SCAMP). Adolescents self-reported their use of any SBMD (mobile phone, tablet, laptop, television etc.). Sleep variables were derived from self-reported weekday and/or weekend bedtime, sleep onset latency (SOL) and wake time. Sleep quality was assessed using four standardised dimensions from the Swiss Health Survey. HRQoL was estimated using the KIDSCREEN-10 questionnaire. RESULTS: Over two-thirds (71.5%) of adolescents reported using at least one SBMD at night-time, and about a third (32.2%) reported using mobile phones at night-time in darkness. Night-time mobile phone and television use was associated with higher odds of insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (Odds Ratio, OR=1.82, 95% Confidence Interval, CI [1.59, 2.07] and OR=1.40, 95% CI [1.23, 1.60], respectively). Adolescents who used mobile phones in a room with light were more likely to have insufficient sleep (OR=1.32, 95% CI [1.10, 1.60]) and later sleep midpoint (OR=1.64, 95% CI [1.37, 1.95]) on weekends compared to non-users. The magnitude of these associations was even stronger for those who used mobile phones in darkness for insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (OR=2.13, 95% CI [1.79, 2.54]) and for later sleep midpoint on weekdays (OR=3.88, 95% CI [3.25, 4.62]) compared to non-users. Night-time use of mobile phones was associated with lower HRQoL and use in a dark room was associated with even lower KIDSCREEN-10 score (beta=-1.18, 95% CI [-1.85, -0.52]) compared to no use. CONCLUSIONS: We found consistent associations between night-time SBMD use and poor sleep outcomes and worse HRQoL in adolescents. The magnitude of these associations was stronger when SBMD use occurred in a dark room versus a lit room.  
  Address MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK; National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Health Impact of Environmental Hazards at King's College London, a Partnership with Public Health England, and collaboration with Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK. Electronic address: m.toledano@imperial.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30640131 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2181  
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