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Author (up) Brandt, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Accuracy of satellite-derived estimates of flaring volume for offshore oil and gas operations in nine countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Flaring of natural gas contributes to climate change and wastes a potentially valuable energy resource. Various groups have estimated flaring volumes via remote sensing by nighttime detection of flares using multi-spectral imaging. However, only limited efforts have been made to independently assess the accuracy of these estimation methods. I analyze the accuracy of the VIIRS Nightfire published flare detection results, comparing yearly estimated flaring rates to reported flaring data from governments in 9 countries(Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Mexico, Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, USA, UK) and 7 years(2012–2018 inclusive). We analyze only flares occurring at offshore oil and gas production platforms and floating production units. A total of 1054 flare volume estimates were compared to volumes reported to government agencies. 80.8% of flare estimates lie within 0.5 orders of magnitude (OM) of reported volumes, which 93.7% fall within 1 OM of the reported volume. Little systematic bias is found except in the smallest size classes(<106 m3 y−1 ). Relative error ratios are larger for smaller flares. No significant trend was observed across years, and variation by country is in line with that expected by size distribution of flares by country. Wide aggregate estimates for groups of flares will exhibit little bias and dispersion, with the sum of 1000 flares having an expected interquartile range of −6% to +3% of actual reported volumes. Social media blurb: Test of remote sensing for flare detection shows accuracy across 9 countries and 8 years.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2958  
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Author (up) Cho, M., Park, R., Yoon, J., Choi, Y., Jeong, J. I., Labzovskii, L., Fu, J. S., Huang, K., Jeong, S., & Kim, B. url  openurl
  Title A missing component of Arctic warming: Black carbon from gas flaring Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Letters Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Gas flaring during oil extraction over the Arctic region is the primary source of warming-inducing aerosols (e.g., black carbon (BC)) with a strong potential to affect regional climate change. Despite continual BC emissions near the Arctic Ocean via gas flaring, the climatic impacts of BC related to gas flaring remain uncertain. Here, we present simulations of potential gas flaring using an earth system model with comprehensive aerosol physics that to show that increases in BC from gas flaring can potentially explain a significant fraction of Arctic warming. BC emissions from gas flaring over high latitudes contribute to locally confined warming over the source region, especially during the Arctic spring through BC-induced local albedo reduction. This local warming invokes remote and temporally lagging sea-ice melting feedback processes over the Arctic Ocean during winter. Our findings imply that a regional change in anthropogenic aerosol forcing is capable of changing Arctic temperatures in regions far from the aerosol source via time-lagged, sea-ice-related Arctic physical processes. We suggest that both energy consumption and production processes can increase Arctic warming.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2645  
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Author (up) Gaughan, A. E., Oda, T., Sorichetta, A., Stevens, F. R., Bondarenko, M., Bun, R., Krauser, L., Yetman, G., & Nghiem, S. V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating nighttime lights and population distribution as proxies for mapping anthropogenic CO2 emission in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 9 Pages 091006  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; Asia; Vietnam; Cambodia; Laos; nighttime light  
  Abstract Tracking spatiotemporal changes in GHG emissions is key to successful implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). And while emission inventories often provide a robust tool to track emission trends at the country level, subnational emission estimates are often not reported or reports vary in robustness as the estimates are often dependent on the spatial modeling approach and ancillary data used to disaggregate the emission inventories. Assessing the errors and uncertainties of the subnational emission estimates is fundamentally challenging due to the lack of physical measurements at the subnational level. To begin addressing the current performance of modeled gridded CO2 emissions, this study compares two common proxies used to disaggregate CO2 emission estimates. We use a known gridded CO2 model based on satellite-observed nighttime light (NTL) data (Open Source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, ODIAC) and a gridded population dataset driven by a set of ancillary geospatial data. We examine the association at multiple spatial scales of these two datasets for three countries in Southeast Asia: Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and characterize the spatiotemporal similarities and differences for 2000, 2005, and 2010. We specifically highlight areas of potential uncertainty in the ODIAC model, which relies on the single use of NTL data for disaggregation of the non-point emissions estimates. Results show, over time, how a NTL-based emissions disaggregation tends to concentrate CO2 estimates in different ways than population-based estimates at the subnational level. We discuss important considerations in the disconnect between the two modeled datasets and argue that the spatial differences between data products can be useful to identify areas affected by the errors and uncertainties associated with the NTL-based downscaling in a region with uneven urbanization rates.  
  Address University of Louisville, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Louisville, KY, United States of America; ae.gaughan(at)louisville.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2727  
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Author (up) Hauptfleisch, M.; Dalton, C. openurl 
  Title Arthropod phototaxis and its possible effect on bird strike risk at two Namibian airports Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Applied Ecology and Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Appl. Ecol. & Environ. Res.  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 957-965  
  Keywords Animals; airport; arthropods; birds; bird strike; phototaxis; Lepidoptera; Namibia  
  Abstract Aircraft wildlife collisions are a global safety and financial problem for the aviation industry, with birds being the main concern. In Namibia, 97% of collisions at Namibia’s two main airports are reported to be with insectivorous birds. Phototaxis was identified as a major attractant to insectivorous

birds, which feed on the arthropods attracted to airport apron and terminal lights. This study considered the effect of light as an attraction at the rurally situated Hosea Kutako International and urban Eros airports. It further investigated the attractiveness of light colour (or wavelength) on arthropod abundance, biomass and diversity. The study found that phototaxis was a significant factor at Hosea Kutako only, and that white light was the main attractant for arthropods, specifically for large moths (Order Lepidoptera),

while yellow and orange light attracted significantly less arthropods. The study indicates a high likelihood that the Hosea Kutako apron lights (white) are an important attractant for arthropods, and therefore indirectly insectivorous birds, which can be reduced by replacing them with orange or yellow filters.
 
  Address Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences, Polytechnic of Namibia, Private Bag 13388, Windhoek, Namibia; mhauptfleisch@polytechnic.edu.na  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Aloki Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1160  
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Author (up) Kim, D.E.; Yoon, J.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors that Influence Sleep among Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; aged; environment; long-term care; sleep  
  Abstract Long-term care residents often experience sleep disturbances as they are vulnerable to a variety of physical, psychosocial, and environmental factors that contribute to sleep disturbances. However, few studies have examined the combined impact of multiple factors on sleep among long-term care residents. This study aimed to identify the factors that influence sleep efficiency and sleep quality based on a modified senescent sleep model. A total of 125 residents were recruited from seven long-term care facilities in South Korea. Sleep patterns and sleep quality were collected using 3-day sleep logs and the Minimal Insomnia Screening Scale for Korean adults (KMISS), respectively. The mean sleep efficiency was 84.6% and the mean score on sleep quality was 15.25. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that greater dependence in activities of daily living (ADL), higher pain, and light at night were related to lower sleep efficiency. Higher pain and fatigue, less activity time, noise and light at night, and lower nighttime staffing levels were related to poorer sleep quality. This study highlights that psychosocial and environmental factors as well as physical factors could influence sleep for long-term care residents. Our findings could be foundational evidence for multi-faceted sleep intervention program development in long-term care settings.  
  Address Research Institute of Nursing Science and College of Nursing, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32183274 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2861  
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Author (up) Lai, K.Y.; Sarkar, C.; Ni, M.Y.; Gallacher, J.; Webster, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night (LAN) and risk of obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environmental Research  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background

There is emerging evidence of the association between light at night (LAN) exposure and weight gain.

Objective

We aim to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies on the association between LAN exposure and risk of obesity in human subjects.

Methods

Peer-reviewed observational studies were systematically searched from MEDLINE (EBSCO), Academic Search Complete (EBSCO), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO) and PubMed up to 24 December 2019. Random-effects models were developed to estimate the associations between LAN exposure and weight-related outcomes of overweight and obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-hip-ratio and waist-to-height-ratio. The I2 statistic was used to assess the degree of heterogeneity across studies. The National Toxicology Program’s Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) risk of bias rating tool and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) guideline were respectively employed to assess the risk of bias and to appraise the quality of the generated evidence.

Results

A total of 12 studies (three with longitudinal and nine of cross-sectional design) published between 2003-2019 were included for systematic review, while seven of them fulfilling the inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. A higher LAN exposure was significantly associated with 13% higher odds of overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) (Summary Odds Ratio; SOR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.10-1.16) with low heterogeneity (I2 = 27.27%), and 22% higher odds of obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) (SOR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.07-1.38) with substantial heterogeneity (I2 = 85.96%). Stratifying analyses by the levels of measurement of LAN exposures (macro-, meso- and micro-levels) and time of LAN measurement (including before and while sleeping) consistently produced robust estimates, with higher exposure to LAN being positively associated with poorer weight outcomes. Assessment of risk of bias identified substantial detection bias for exposure, with over half of the pooled studies employing subjective LAN measures. The overall evidence of the association between LAN exposure and risk of obesity was rated as ‘moderate’ as per the GRADE guideline.

Conclusions

Exposure to LAN was reported to be a significant risk factor for overweight and obesity. Prospectively designed future studies with objectively measured multi-level LAN exposures and weight outcomes are required.
 
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  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2916  
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Author (up) Leng, W.; He, G.; Jiang, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Investigating the Spatiotemporal Variability and Driving Factors of Artificial Lighting in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region Using Remote Sensing Imagery and Socioeconomic Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 16 Issue 11 Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract With rapid urbanization and economic development, artificial lighting at night brings convenience to human life but also causes a considerable urban environmental pollution issue. This study employed the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test, nighttime light indices, and the standard deviation method to investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of artificial lighting in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Moreover, nighttime light imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System, socioeconomic data, and high-resolution satellite images were combined to comprehensively explore the driving factors of urban artificial lighting change. The results showed the following: (1) Overall, there was an increasing trend in artificial lighting in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, which accounted for approximately 56.87% of the total study area. (2) The change in artificial lighting in the entire area was relatively stable. The artificial lighting in the northwest area changed faster than that in the southeast area, and the areas where artificial lighting changed the most were Beijing, Tianjin and Tangshan. (3) The fastest growth of artificial lighting was in Chengde and Zhangjiakou, where the rates of increase were 334% and 251%, respectively. The spatial heterogeneity of artificial lighting in economically developed cities was higher than that in economically underdeveloped cities such as Chengde and Zhangjiakou. (4) Multi-source data were combined to analyse the driving factors of urban artificial lighting in the entire area. The Average Population of Districts under City (R(2) = 0.77) had the strongest effect on artificial lighting. Total Passenger Traffic (R(2) = 0.54) had the most non-obvious effect. At different city levels, driving factors varied with differences of economy, geographical location, and the industrial structures of cities. Urban expansion, transportation hubs, and industries were the major reasons for the significant change in nighttime light. Urban artificial lighting represents a trend of overuse closely related to nighttime light pollution. This study of artificial lighting contributes to the rational planning of urban lighting systems, the prevention and control of nighttime light pollution, and the creation of liveable and ecologically green cities.  
  Address China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research (IWHR), Beijing 100038, China. jiangwei@radi.ac.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31159391 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2535  
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Author (up) Nadybal, S.M.; Collins, T.W.; Grineski, S.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution inequities in the continental United States: A distributive environmental justice analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 189 Issue Pages 109959  
  Keywords Society; Planning; Inequality; Environmental justice; Race/ethnicity; Socioeconomic status; United States  
  Abstract Excessive exposure to ambient light at night is a well-documented hazard to human health, yet analysts have not examined it from an environmental justice (EJ) perspective. We conducted the first EJ study of exposure to light pollution by testing for socially disparate patterns across the continental United States (US). We first calculated population-weighted mean exposures to examine whether ambient light pollution in the US differed between racial/ethnic groups. We then used multivariable generalized estimating equations (GEEs) that adjust for geographic clustering to examine whether light pollution was distributed inequitably based on racial/ethnic composition and socioeconomic status across US neighborhoods (census tracts). Finally, we conducted a stratified analysis of metropolitan core, suburban, and small city–rural tracts to determine whether patterns of inequity varied based on urban-rural context. We found evidence of disparities in exposures to light pollution based on racial/ethnic minority and low-to-mid socioeconomic statuses. Americans of Asian, Hispanic or Black race/ethnicity had population-weighted mean exposures to light pollution in their neighborhoods that were approximately two times that of White Americans. GEEs indicated that neighborhoods composed of higher proportions of Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, or renter-occupants experienced greater exposures to ambient light at night. Stratified analyses indicated that those patterns of inequity did not substantially vary based on urban-rural context. Findings have implications for understanding environmental influences on health disparities, raise concerns about the potential for a multiple environmental jeopardy situation, and highlight the need for policy actions to address light pollution.  
  Address Department of Geography, University of Utah, 260 Central Campus Dr., Rm. 4625, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3059  
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Author (up) Nowinszky, L. url  openurl
  Title Nocturnal illumination and night flying insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 17–52  
  Keywords Animals; light-trap; collecting distance; Babinet-point; moon phases  
  Abstract The present study discusses the light trapping of insects depending on the environmental illumination, twilight polarization phenomena and the moon phases. The trapping data were taken of Hungarian national light-trap network. The important results are the followings: The Babinet-point, a polarization free spot of the sky at twilight, can be a role of orientation of insects. The height of the Moon above

the horizon is in negative correlation with the number of the caught insects. The maximum individual

number of species was collected at various moon phases.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 407  
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Author (up) Pena-Garcia, A.; Nguyen, T.P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Global Perspective for Sustainable Highway Tunnel Lighting Regulations: Greater Road Safety with a Lower Environmental Impact Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 15 Issue 12 Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Tunnel lighting installations function 24 h a day, 365 days a year. These infrastructures have increased exponentially and now connect quite distant locations, even on different continents. This has led European administrations and international regulatory bodies to establish regulations for tunnel safety with the lowest environmental impact. However, until now, these regulations have almost exclusively focused on traffic safety, and relegated sustainability to the background. Even though they recognize the need to reduce energy consumption, they do not propose any tools for doing so. Given the impact of these installations and the lack of a specific regulatory framework, Asian countries will soon be forced either to update previous standards for tunnel lighting or elaborate new ones. A better understanding of the weaknesses of European regulations combined with a willingness to embrace innovation could position Asia as a world leader in the regulation of more sustainable road tunnels. The objective of this research was to improve the sustainability of tunnel lighting installations through new regulations or amendments to existing ones, without impairing the mental well-being of users, who could potentially be affected by energy-saving measures. Accordingly, this paper presents and analyzes a broad proposal for formulating tunnel lighting regulations. The originality of this proposal lies in the fact that it integrates road safety, lower environmental impact, and user well-being. Furthermore, it is expected to broaden the perspective of regulatory bodies and public administrations with regard to tunnel installations, which would ultimately enhance their sustainability.  
  Address Department of Development and Sustainability, School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, 12120 Pathumthani, Thailand. phuoclai@ait.asia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30486333 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2119  
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