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Author (up) Bhatti, P.; Mirick, D.K.; Davis, S.
Title Invited commentary: Shift work and cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol
Volume 176 Issue 9 Pages 760-3; discussion 764-5
Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Male; *Men's Health; Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Occupations/*statistics & numerical data; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*statistics & numerical data
Abstract In this issue of the Journal, Parent et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(9):751-759) report significant associations between night-shift work and risk of cancer at several sites among men. These findings not only address the need for shift-work studies that evaluate cancers other than breast and prostate cancer but also support the increasing concern that the negative effects of shift work may be broadly applicable to risk of many cancers via the direct oncostatic properties of melatonin. Studies of shift work have been limited by a lack of detailed data for determining which aspects of this multifaceted exposure may be associated with increased cancer risk. Additionally, the influence of individual-level characteristics, such as preference for daytime activity versus nighttime activity or chronotype, has not been considered. In moving forward, launching new cohort studies of shift work and cancer risk is the most tenable approach, though it will be limited by the years of follow-up required in order to accrue adequate numbers of cancer cases. Studies incorporating biomarkers of effect are useful for providing immediate information that can aid not only in identifying the underlying mechanisms of the shift-work-cancer association but also in interpreting existing epidemiologic data and informing the design of future epidemiologic studies of cancer risk.
Address Program in Epidemiology, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. pbhatti@fhcrc.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23035018 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 507
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Author (up) Carta, M.G.; Preti, A.; Akiskal, H.S.
Title Coping with the New Era: Noise and Light Pollution, Hperactivity and Steroid Hormones. Towards an Evolutionary View of Bipolar Disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health : CP & EMH Abbreviated Journal Clin Pract Epidemiol Ment Health
Volume 14 Issue Pages 33-36
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Human population is increasing in immense cities with millions of inhabitants, in which life is expected to run 24 hours a day for seven days a week (24/7). Noise and light pollution are the most reported consequences, with a profound impact on sleep patterns and circadian biorhythms. Disruption of sleep and biorhythms has severe consequences on many metabolic pathways. Suppression of melatonin incretion at night and the subsequent effect on DNA methylation may increase the risk of prostate and breast cancer. A negative impact of light pollution on neurosteroids may also affect mood. People who carry the genetic risk of bipolar disorder may be at greater risk of full-blown bipolar disorder because of the impact of noise and light pollution on sleep patterns and circadian biorhythms. However, living in cities may also offers opportunities and might be selective for people with hyperthymic temperament, who may find themselves advantaged by increased energy prompted by increased stimulation produced by life in big cities. This might result in the spreading of the genetic risk of bipolar disorder in the coming decades. In this perspective the burden of poor quality of life, increased disability adjusted life years and premature mortality due to the increases of mood disorders is the negative side of a phenomenon that in its globality also shows adaptive aspects. The new lifestyle also influences those who adapt and show behaviors, reactions and responses that might resemble the disorder, but are on the adaptive side.
Address University of California at San Diego USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1745-0179 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29541149; PMCID:PMC5838624 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1823
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Author (up) Davis, R. L.
Title Light Exposure and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
Year 1991 Publication Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages 458
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address
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ISSN ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 735
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Author (up) Erren, T.C.; Lewis, P.
Title Hypothesis: ubiquitous circadian disruption can cause cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol
Volume 34 Issue 1 Pages 1-4
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Circadian disruption (CD) was implicated in chains of cancer causation when the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified shift-work involving circadian disruption as probably carcinogenic in 2007. In the following decade, epidemiological studies into causal concepts associated with circadian disruption were inconclusive. Unappreciated complexity with an exclusive focus on shift-work, light-at-night, sleep, and melatonin in regard to circadian disruption may be accountable. With compelling non-epidemiological evidence, we posit that ubiquitous circadian disruption causes cancer and, moreover, that this is unexplored epidemiologically. This hypothesis offers a novel explanation why numerous studies in shift-workers evince inconsistent results: If circadian disruption is a ubiquitous causal phenomenon, confining assessments to the workplace, ignoring circadian disruption at play, and potential misclassification of 'who' is 'when' and 'how much' exposed to circadian disruption may disallow detecting the existence and magnitude of cancer risks. The rationale herein provides plausible explanations for previous observations and makes falsifiable predictions.
Address Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Prevention Research, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. philip.lewis@uk-koeln.de
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30547255 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2156
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Author (up) Garcia-Saenz, A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Espinosa, A.; Costas, L.; Aragones, N.; Tonne, C.; Moreno, V.; Perez-Gomez, B.; Valentin, A.; Pollan, M.; Castano-Vinyal, G.; Aube, M.; Kogevinas, M.
Title Association between outdoor light-at-night exposure and colorectal cancer in Spain (MCC-Spain study) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Epidemiology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract BACKGROUND: Night shift work, exposure to artificial light-at-night and particularly blue light spectrum, and the consequent circadian disruption may increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Colorectal cancer risk may also be increased among night-shift workers. We investigated the association between exposure to artificial light at night according to light spectrum and colorectal cancer among subjects who had never worked at night in a general population case-control study in Spain. METHODS: We examined information on 661 incident histologically verified colorectal cancer cases and 1322 controls from Barcelona and Madrid, 2007-2013. Outdoor artificial light at night exposure was based on images from the International Space Station (ISS) including data on remotely sensed upward light intensity. We derived adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates and confidence intervals (CI) for visual light, blue light, and spectral sensitivities of the five human photopigments assigned to participant's geocoded longest residence. RESULTS: : Exposure to blue light spectrum was positively associated with colorectal cancer (OR=1.6; 95%CI: 1.2-2.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). ORs were similar (OR=1.7; 95%CI: 1.3-2.3) when further adjusting for area socioeconomic status, diet patterns, smoking, sleep and family history. We observed no association for outdoor visual light (full spectrum) (OR = 1.0, 95%CI 0.7-1.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). Analysis of the five photopigments gave similar results with increased risks for shorter wavelengths overlapping with the blue spectrum and no association for longer wavelengths. CONCLUSIONS: Outdoor blue light spectrum exposure that is increasingly prevalent in recent years may be associated with colorectal cancer risk.
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1044-3983 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32639250 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3043
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