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Author (up) Bará, S.
Title Variations on a classical theme: On the formal relationship between magnitudes per square arcsecond and luminance Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal Intl J of Sustainable Lighting
Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 77
Keywords Instrumentation; skyglow; luminance; magnitude; sky brigthness; photometry
Abstract The formal link between magnitudes per square arcsecond and luminance is discussed in this paper. Directly related to the human visual system, luminance is defined in terms of the spectral radiance of the source, weighted by the CIE V(l) luminous efficiency function, and scaled by the 683 lm/W luminous efficacy constant. In consequence, any exact and spectrum-independent relationship between luminance and magnitudes per square arcsecond requires that the last ones be measured precisely in the CIE V(l) band. The luminance value corresponding to mVC=0 (zero-point of the CIE V(l) magnitude scale) depends on the reference source chosen for the definition of the magnitude system. Using absolute AB magnitudes, the zero point luminance of the CIE V(l) photometric band is 10.96 x 104 cd·m-2.
Address Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es
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ISSN 2586-1247 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2162
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Author (up) Bará, S.; Lima, R.C.
Title Photons without borders: quantifying light pollution transfer between territories Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal
Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 51-61
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The light pollution levels experienced at any given site generally depend on a wide number of artificial light sources distributed throughout the surrounding territory. Since photons can travel long distances before being scattered by the atmosphere, any effective proposal for reducing local light pollution levels needs an accurate assessment of the relative weight of all intervening light sources, including those located tens or even hundreds of km away. In this paper we describe several ways of quantifying and visualizing these relative weights. Particular emphasis is made on the aggregate contribution of the municipalities, which are -in many regions of the world- the administrative bodies primarily responsible for the planning and maintenance of public outdoor lighting systems.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2066
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Author (up) Barentine, J.
Title Who speaks for the night? The regulation of light pollution in the ‘Rights of Nature’ legal framework Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal IJSL
Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 28-36
Keywords Society; Law; Rights of Nature
Abstract Efforts to control artificial light at night (ALAN) through public policies began in the late 1950s, yet light pollution continues to grow at a global average rate roughly twice that of population growth. The current global ALAN regulatory regime is clearly inadequate to solve the problem, and achieving meaningful light pollution reductions requires a new approach. This paper reviews the legal status quo, introduces the “Rights of Nature” doctrine, and advances the idea of nighttime darkness as a natural characteristic of sufficient inherent value to merit legal consideration in the Rights of Nature context. It concludes with a series of recommendations for ways forward, including the recognition of the intrinsic value of dark skies in the preambulatory language of legislation, formulating new policies in anticipation of broad adoption of Rights of Nature statutes, and advancing the significance of natural nighttime darkness in case law arguments.
Address International Dark-Sky Association, 5049 E Broadway Blvd, Suite 105 Tucson, AZ 85711-3646 USA; john ( at ) darksky ( dot ) org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IJSL Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2586-1247 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3258
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Author (up) Barentine, J.C.
Title Going for the Gold : Quantifying and Ranking Visual Night Sky Quality in International Dark Sky Places Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal IJSL
Volume 18 Issue Pages 9-15
Keywords Society; conservation; dark sky places; dark sky; National parks; dark sky parks; national parks; Luminescent Measurements; Night sky brightness
Abstract Since the invention of electric lighting in the nineteenth century, the steadily increasing use of artificial light at night in outdoor spaces has grown to threaten the integrity of dark night skies and nocturnal terrestrial spaces. The conservation community has gradually come to accept the need to protect natural nighttime darkness, which finds expression in dark sky parks and similar protected areas. As these places begin to reap tangible economic benefits in the form of sustainable ‘astrotourism,’ the movement to actively protect them gains strength. The International Dark-Sky Association designates Dark Sky Parks and Reserves under a comparative ranking scheme that assigns night sky quality tiers according to a combination of objective and subjective characteristics, but shortcomings in the consistency of these ratings exist that undermine the consistency and reputation of the designation program. Here we consider potential changes to the qualification regime to make the ratings system more robust for the benefit of future designations.
Address 3323 N 1st Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85719 USA; john(at)darksky.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2586-1247 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1779
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Author (up) Hyde, E.; Frank, S.; Barentine, J. C.; Kuechly, H.; Kyba, C. C. M.
Title Testing for changes in light emissions from certified International Dark Sky Places Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 11-19
Keywords Remote Sensing; Conservation; Policy
Abstract The International Dark-Sky Places (IDSP) program of the International Dark-Sky Association is a voluntary certification in which communities commit via legislative changes to move towards more sustainable lighting that reduces light pollution. As over 115 IDSP have now been certified, it is interesting to ask the extent to which this certification results in reduced light emissions. In this paper, we compared trends in upward light emission of 98 communities located in or near IDSP to those of 98 similarly sized communities further away from the IDSP, using a night lights observing satellite (the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day-Night Band). The current dataset is not sufficient to distinguish the hypothesis that IDSP certification results in a lower rate of change in upward light emissions from the null hypothesis that IDSP certification has no impact. This result is with regard to upward light emissions only: it is possible that certification has resulted in decreases in night sky brightness that the satellite is not able to observe.
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2616
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