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Author (up) Benot, S.; R. Goberna; R. J. Reiter; S. Garcia-Mauriño; C. Osuna; J. M. Guerrero url  openurl
  Title Physiological levels of melatonin contribute to the antioxidant capacity of human serum Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue Pages 59-64  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract This work evaluates whether physiological concentrations of the pineal secretory product melatonin contribute to the total antioxidant status (TAS) of human serum. Day and nighttime serum samples were collected from healthy volunteers ranging from 2 to 89 years of age and used to measure melatonin and TAS. Results showed that both melatonin and TAS in human serum exhibited 24 hr variations with nocturnal peak values at 01:00 hr. Moreover, exposure of volunteers to light at night resulted in clear decreases of both TAS and melatonin. Furthermore, when melatonin was removed from sera collected at night, the TAS value of the sample was reduced to basal daytime values. In aging studies, it was found that nocturnal serum values of TAS and melatonin exhibited maximal values during the first four decades; thereafter, these values decreased as age advanced. In 60-year-old individuals, day/night differences in serum melatonin and TAS levels were clearly diminished, by more than 80%, with these differences being completely abolished in older individuals. Our results suggest that melatonin contributes to the total antioxidative capability of human serum. This antioxidant contribution of melatonin is reduced as age advances correlating with the age-related reduction of melatonin.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 719  
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Author (up) Deveson, Sharon L; Arendt, Josephine; Forsyth, Isabel A url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sensitivity of Goats to a Light Pulse During the Night as Assessed by Suppression of Melatonin Concentrations in the Plasma Type Journal Article
  Year 1990 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 169-177  
  Keywords animals; goat; Circadian Rhythm; Light intensity  
  Abstract This study investigates the ability of a 1 h light pulse of different intensities at night to suppress plasma melatonin in goats. Six female Saanen dairy goats, about 2 yr old, were housed in a light-tight shed. The goats were habituated for 1 wk to an 8L: 16D photoperiod (40.70 ± 4.16 &#956;W/cm2; 137 ± 14 lux), lights on 0800 h. A 1 h light pulse, of different intensity on each occasion, was given from 1900 to 2000 h. Light intensity was measured by using a lux meter (mean of 36 measurements at goat's eye level). Five different light intensities were given during December in the order 4.22 ± 0.62 &#956;W/cm2 (14.2 ± 2.1 lux), 0.68 ± 0.09 &#956;W/cm2 (2.3 ± 0.3 lux), 0.26 ± 0.004 &#956;W/cm2 (O.87 ± 0.14 lux), darkness, 40.70 ± 4.16 &#956;W/cm2 (137 ± 14 lux), with 1–3 d between treatments. The goats were bled hourly from 1500 to 1900 h and every 15 min from 1900 to 2100 h, and a last bleed occurred at 2200 h. Dark-phase samples were taken in dim red light (<0.03 &#956;W/cm2; 0.1 lux). Plasma was assayed for melatonin by radioimmunoassay. Suppression of melatonin concentrations increased as light intensity increased as follows: Darkness, 0%; 0.26 ± 0.004 &#956;W/cm2; 0%; 0.68 ± 0.09 &#956;W/cm2; 43.1%; 4.22 ± 0.62 &#956;W/cm2, 71.1%; 40.70 ± 4.16 &#956;W/cm2, 81.2%. Suppression was significant (P<0.05) at light intensities >0.68 &#956;W/cm2, 2.3 lux. A hyperbolic relationship existed between percent suppression and light intensities.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1585  
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Author (up) Lerchl, A.; Schindler, C.; Eichhorn, K.; Kley, F.; Erren, T.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Indirect blue light does not suppress nocturnal salivary melatonin in humans in an automobile setting Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 47 Issue 2 Pages 143-146  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; *Automobiles; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/metabolism/*secretion; Salivary Glands/*secretion; Statistics, Nonparametric  
  Abstract In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as being probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). In this context, light exposure during the night plays a key role because it can suppress nocturnal melatonin levels when exposures exceed a certain threshold. Blue light around 464 nm is most effective in suppressing melatonin because of the spectral sensitivity of melanopsin, a recently discovered photopigment in retinal ganglion cells; the axons of these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a circadian master clock in the brain. Due to advances in light technologies, normal tungsten light bulbs are being replaced by light-emitting diodes which produce quasi-monochromatic or white light. The objective of this study was to assess whether the light-melanopsin-melatonin axis might be affected in automobiles at night which employ the new generation diodes. To this end, we have tested in an experimental automobile setting whether indirect blue light (lambda(max) = 465 nm) at an intensity of 0.22 or 1.25 lx can suppress salivary melatonin levels in 12 male volunteers (age range 17-27 years) who served as their own controls. Daytime levels were low (2.7 +/- 0.5 pg/mL), and night-time levels without light exposure were high (14.5 +/- 1.1 pg/mL), as expected. Low-intensity light exposures had no significant effect on melatonin levels (0.22 lx: 17.2 +/- 2.8 pg/mL; P > 0.05; 1.25 lx: 12.6 +/- 2.0 pg/mL; P > 0.05). It is concluded that indirect blue light exposures in automobiles up to 1.25 lx do not cause unintentional chronodisruption via melatonin suppression.  
  Address School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, D-28759 Bremen, Germany. a.lerchl@jacobs-university.de  
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  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:19555449 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 777  
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Author (up) Morera, A.L.; Abreu, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Daytime/night-time and summer/winter melatonin and malondialdehyde rhythms: an inverse relationship Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 313-314  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Humans; *Light; Malondialdehyde/*metabolism; Melatonin/*metabolism; *Seasons  
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  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:17803530 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 784  
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Author (up) Navara, K.J.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
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  Title The dark side of light at night: physiological, epidemiological, and ecological consequences Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 215-224  
  Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks; *Darkness; Disease; Ecology; Humans; Oxidative Stress; Work  
  Abstract Organisms must adapt to the temporal characteristics of their surroundings to successfully survive and reproduce. Variation in the daily light cycle, for example, acts through endocrine and neurobiological mechanisms to control several downstream physiological and behavioral processes. Interruptions in normal circadian light cycles and the resulting disruption of normal melatonin rhythms cause widespread disruptive effects involving multiple body systems, the results of which can have serious medical consequences for individuals, as well as large-scale ecological implications for populations. With the invention of electrical lights about a century ago, the temporal organization of the environment has been drastically altered for many species, including humans. In addition to the incidental exposure to light at night through light pollution, humans also engage in increasing amounts of shift-work, resulting in repeated and often long-term circadian disruption. The increasing prevalence of exposure to light at night has significant social, ecological, behavioral, and health consequences that are only now becoming apparent. This review addresses the complicated web of potential behavioral and physiological consequences resulting from exposure to light at night, as well as the large-scale medical and ecological implications that may result.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. knavara@gmail.com  
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  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:17803517 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 17  
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