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Author Cho, J.R.; Joo, E.Y.; Koo, D.L.; Hong, S.B.
Title Let there be no light: the effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background electroencephalographic rhythms Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 14 Issue 12 Pages 1422-1425
Keywords Eeg; Light; Polysomnography; Sleep; Sleep spindle; Slow oscillation
Abstract (up) OBJECTIVES: Artificial lighting has been beneficial to society, but unnecessary light exposure at night may cause various health problems. We aimed to investigate how whole-night bedside light can affect sleep quality and brain activity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten healthy sleepers underwent two polysomnography (PSG) sessions, one with the lights off and one with the lights on. PSG variables related to sleep quality were extracted and compared between lights-off and lights-on sleep. Spectral analysis was performed to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs to reveal any light-induced differences in background brain rhythms. RESULTS: Lights-on sleep was associated with increased stage 1 sleep (N1), decreased slow-wave sleep (SWS), and increased arousal index. Spectral analysis revealed that theta power (4-8Hz) during REM sleep and slow oscillation (0.5-1Hz), delta (1-4Hz), and spindle (10-16Hz) power during NREM sleep were decreased in lights-on sleep conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Sleeping with the light on not only causes shallow sleep and frequent arousals but also has a persistent effect on brain oscillations, especially those implicated in sleep depth and stability. Our study demonstrates additional hazardous effect of light pollution on health.
Address Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24210607 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 141
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Author Choi, S. J., Park, H. R. & Joo, E. Y.
Title Effects of Light on Daytime Sleep in 12 Hours Night Shift Workers: A Field Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Korean Sleep Research Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-35
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract (up) Objectives: Night shift workers suffer from sleep and daytime disturbances due to circadian misalignment. To investigate the role of environmental light in daytime sleep following 12 h-night shift work. Methods: we enrolled 12 h-shift female nurses working at one university-affiliated hospital (n=10, mean age 26.6 years, shift work duration 3.8 years). This is a cross-over study to compare sleep between under light exposure (30 lux) and in the dark (<5 lux) following 12 h-night duty. Two sessions of experiments were underwent and the interval between sessions was about a month. Psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) had performed on awakening from sleep at each session and sleep-wake pattern had been monitored by actigraphy throughout the study period. Daytime sleep was also compared with night sleep of age-and gender matched daytime workers (n=10). Results: Sleep parameters and PVT scores were not different between two light conditions. Activities during sleep seemed to be more abundant under 30 lux condition than in the dark, which was not significant. Compared to night sleep, daytime sleep of shift workers was different in terms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Three shift workers showed sleep onset REM sleep and first REM sleep period was the longest during daytime sleep. Conclusions: Unexpectedly, daytime sleep of 12 h night shift workers was well-maintained regardless of light exposure. Early occurrence of REM sleep and shorter sleep latency during daytime sleep suggest that shift workers meet with misalignment of circadian rhythm as well as increased homeostatic sleep pressure drive.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Korean Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2635
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Author Wang, H.-B.; Whittaker, D.S.; Truong, D.; Mulji, A.K.; Ghiani, C.A.; Loh, D.H.; Colwell, C.S.
Title Blue light therapy improves circadian dysfunction as well as motor symptoms in two mouse models of Huntington's disease Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms
Volume 2 Issue Pages 39-52
Keywords animals; Human Health
Abstract (up) Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) exhibit movement disorders, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive impairments as the disease progresses. Abnormal sleep/wake cycles are common among HD patients with reports of delayed sleep onset, fatigue during the day, and a delayed pattern of melatonin secretion all of which suggest circadian dysfunction. Mouse models of HD confirm disrupted circadian rhythms with pathophysiology found in the central circadian clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus). Importantly, circadian dysfunction manifests early in disease, even before the classic motor symptoms, in both patients and mouse models. Therefore, we hypothesize that the circadian dysfunction may interact with the disease pathology and exacerbate the HD symptoms. If correct, early intervention may benefit patients and delay disease progression. One test of this hypothesis is to determine whether light therapy designed to strengthen this intrinsic timing system can delay the disease progression in mouse models. Therefore, we determined the impact of blue wavelength-enriched light on two HD models: the BACHD and Q175 mice. Both models received 6 hours of blue-light at the beginning of their daily light cycle for 3 months. After treatment, both genotypes showed improvements in their locomotor activity rhythm without significant change to their sleep behavior. Critically, treated mice of both lines exhibited improved motor performance compared to untreated controls. Focusing on the Q175 genotype, we sought to determine whether the treatment altered signaling pathways in brain regions known to be impacted by HD using NanoString gene expression assays. We found that the expression of several HD relevant markers was altered in the striatum and cortex of the treated mice. Our study demonstrates that strengthening the circadian system can delay the progression of HD in pre-clinical models. This work suggests that lighting conditions should be considered when managing treatment of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2451-9944 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1626
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Author Skene, D.J.; Arendt, J.
Title Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in the blind and their treatment with melatonin Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 651-655
Keywords Human Health; Blindness/*complications; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Humans; Melatonin/*administration & dosage; Sleep/drug effects; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*drug therapy/*etiology; Treatment Outcome
Abstract (up) People who are blind, in addition to having to cope with partial or no sight, have an added handicap; the transmission of ocular light from the retina to their circadian clock is impaired. At its worse, for example in people with both eyes enucleated, this lesion results in desynchronisation of the biological clock (located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei) from the 24h day/night environment. While in a desynchronised state, symptoms akin to jet lag are experienced (e.g., daytime sleepiness, poor night sleep, reduced alertness and performance during waking). This is a lifelong condition. Daily administration of exogenous melatonin is the current treatment of choice for this so-called “non-24h sleep/wake disorder”. Melatonin has been shown to correct the underlying circadian rhythm abnormality as well as improve sleep and reduce daytime napping. The effectiveness of melatonin therapy depends upon its time of administration relative to the timing of the person's circadian clock. If practicable, assessment of an individual's circadian phase (by measurement of the endogenous melatonin rhythm in plasma, saliva or urine) is recommended prior to commencing treatment to optimise melatonin's effectiveness.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. d.skene@surrey.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17420154 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 811
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Author Woods, H. C., & Scott, H.
Title Merging the Biological and Cognitive Processes of Sleep and Screens Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Current Sleep Medicine Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 150-155
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) Purpose of Review

Screens are a permanent feature of life today and we have reached an interesting juncture with different research agendas investigating the biological and cognitive aspects of screen use separately. This review argues that it is timely and indeed essential that we bring together these research areas to fully understand both positive and negative aspects of screen use.

Recent Findings

More recent work is starting to take a more cohesive approach to understanding how device use pre-bedtime can impact our sleep by including both light and content in their experimental protocols which is a welcome development leading to a more nuanced understanding of both biological and cognitive processes.

Summary

We call for an open and collaborative approach to gain momentum in this direction of acknowledging both biological and cognitive factors enabling us to understand the relative impacts of both whilst using screens with regard to both light and content.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2640
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