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Author Walbeek, T.J.; Harrison, E.M.; Soler, R.R.; Gorman, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Enhanced Circadian Entrainment in Mice and Its Utility under Human Shiftwork Schedules Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 394-413  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The circadian system is generally considered to be incapable of adjusting to rapid changes in sleep/work demands. In shiftworkers this leads to chronic circadian disruption and sleep loss, which together predict underperformance at work and negative health consequences. Two distinct experimental protocols have been proposed to increase circadian flexibility in rodents using dim light at night: rhythm bifurcation and T-cycle (i.e., day length) entrainment. Successful translation of such protocols to human shiftworkers could facilitate alignment of internal time with external demands. To assess entrainment flexibility following bifurcation and exposure to T-cycles, mice in Study 1 were repeatedly phase-shifted. Mice from experimental conditions rapidly phase-shifted their activity, while control mice showed expected transient misalignment. In Study 2 and 3, mice followed a several weeks-long intervention designed to model a modified DuPont or Continental shiftwork schedule, respectively. For both schedules, bifurcation and nocturnal dim lighting reduced circadian misalignment. Together, these studies demonstrate proof of concept that mammalian circadian systems can be rendered sufficiently flexible to adapt to multiple, rapidly changing shiftwork schedules. Flexible adaptation to exotic light-dark cycles likely relies on entrainment mechanisms that are distinct from traditional entrainment.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2661  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Savarese, M.; Di Perri, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Excessive sleepiness in shift work disorder: a narrative review of the last 5 years Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung Abbreviated Journal Sleep Breath  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Human Health; Alertness; Armodafinil; Insomnia; Performance; Shift work disorder; excessive sleepiness; StimulaCentral Nervous System Stimulants; Review  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Shift work sleep disorder (SWSD), also known as shift work disorder (SWD), is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness, associated with a recurring work schedule that overlaps the usual time designated for sleeping. PURPOSE: This article aims to provide a narrative review of the pharmacological trials conducted on SWD in the last 5 years, to better address safety and health issues inherent to this disorder. METHODS: An electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed. All eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cross-over RCTs with employees undertaking shift work (including night shifts) were considered, yielding three articles. RESULTS: All three studies showed the efficacy of armodafinil in improving subjective and objective sleepiness, clinical conditions, and global functioning regardless of shift duration. Both performance and driving simulator performance tests administered during the night shift bore better results following armodafinil administration than after placebo. However, armodafinil only reduced subjective disability in individuals working more than 9 h; furthermore, even after armodafinil, alertness was reduced but not normalized. CONCLUSION: These studies underscore the importance of preventing and/or minimizing disturbances due to shift work. This may be achieved through various strategies, such as the employer's commitment to adopt ergonomic criteria in shift design and to implement work-environment interventions like controlled bright light. Health personnel is of pivotal importance to detect potential factors of intolerance to shift work or early symptoms of SWD. Additional and improved studies are needed to further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.  
  Address Center of Sleep Medicine, UOSD of Neurophysiopathology and Disorders of Movement, AOU G Martino, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, 98121, Messina, Italy. mdiperri@wesleyan.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1520-9512 ISBN Medium  
  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31471831 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2662  
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Author Sletten, T.L.; Cappuccio, F.P.; Davidson, A.J.; Van Cauter, E.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Scheer, F.A.J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Health consequences of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Chronobiology; Sleep; Review  
  Abstract The circadian system is key for optimal functioning by maintaining synchrony between internal circadian rhythms, behaviors, and external cues. Many clinicians are not fully aware, however, of the far-reaching implications of the circadian system for human health. Clinical attention to circadian rhythms has largely focused on sleep disturbances. The impact of the circadian system on health is, however, much broader. Clinical diagnoses are often based on single time point assessments during the day, ignoring circadian influences on physiology. Even when time is considered, using (external) clock time ignores the large interindividual differences in internal timing.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area (up) Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31930347 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2822  
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