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Author Paul, M.A.; Love, R.J.; Hawton, A.; Brett, K.; McCreary, D.R.; Arendt, J.
Title Sleep deficits in the high Arctic summer in relation to light exposure and behaviour: use of melatonin as a countermeasure Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1093
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Author WDS Killgore
Title Lighting the Way to Better Sleep and Health Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Disor: Treat Care
Volume 05 Issue 01 Pages (up)
Keywords Health; Editorial
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2325-9639 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1442
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Author Wams, E.J.; Woelders, T.; Marring, I.; van Rosmalen, L.; Beersma, D.G.M.; Gordijn, M.C.M.; Hut, R.A.
Title Linking Light Exposure and Subsequent Sleep: A Field Polysomnography Study in Humans Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep
Volume 40 Issue 12 Pages (up)
Keywords actigraphy; chronobiology; circadian rhythms; scoring; sleep/wake mechanisms
Abstract Study objectives: To determine the effect of light exposure on subsequent sleep characteristics under ambulatory field conditions. Methods: Twenty healthy participants were fitted with ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) and wrist-actigraphs to assess light exposure, rest-activity, sleep quality, timing, and architecture. Laboratory salivary dim-light melatonin onset was analyzed to determine endogenous circadian phase. Results: Later circadian clock phase was associated with lower intensity (R2 = 0.34, chi2(1) = 7.19, p < .01), later light exposure (quadratic, controlling for daylength, R2 = 0.47, chi2(3) = 32.38, p < .0001), and to later sleep timing (R2 = 0.71, chi2(1) = 20.39, p < .0001). Those with later first exposure to more than 10 lux of light had more awakenings during subsequent sleep (controlled for daylength, R2 = 0.36, chi2(2) = 8.66, p < .05). Those with later light exposure subsequently had a shorter latency to first rapid eye movement (REM) sleep episode (R2 = 0.21, chi2(1) = 5.77, p < .05). Those with less light exposure subsequently had a higher percentage of REM sleep (R2 = 0.43, chi2(2) = 13.90, p < .001) in a clock phase modulated manner. Slow-wave sleep accumulation was observed to be larger after preceding exposure to high maximal intensity and early first light exposure (p < .05). Conclusions: The quality and architecture of sleep is associated with preceding light exposure. We propose that light exposure timing and intensity do not only modulate circadian-driven aspects of sleep but also homeostatic sleep pressure. These novel ambulatory PSG findings are the first to highlight the direct relationship between light and subsequent sleep, combining knowledge of homeostatic and circadian regulation of sleep by light. Upon confirmation by interventional studies, this hypothesis could change current understanding of sleep regulation and its relationship to prior light exposure. Clinical trial details: This study was not a clinical trial. The study was ethically approved and nationally registered (NL48468.042.14).
Address Chronobiology Unit, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29040758; PMCID:PMC5806586 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1885
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Author Wilson IV, J.; Reid, K.J.; Braun, R.I.; Abbott, S.M.; Zee, P.C.
Title Habitual Light Exposure Relative to Circadian Timing in Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal
Volume in press Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Study Objectives

To compare melatonin timing, a well validated marker for endogenous circadian phase, and habitual light exposure patterns in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) and intermediate chronotype controls.

Methods

12 individuals with DSWPD (5 females, mean age 31.1) and 12 age matched controls (6 females, mean age 33.6) underwent a minimum of seven days of light and activity monitoring followed by an inpatient hospital stay, where blood was taken to assess melatonin timing (calculated as dim light melatonin onset – DLMO). Habitual light exposure patterns were then compared to a human phase response curve (PRC) to light.

Results

Relative to clock time, individuals with DSWPD had a later light exposure pattern compared to controls, but their light exposure pattern was earlier relative to DLMO. According to the human phase response curve (PRC) to light, individuals with DSWPD had less daily advancing light exposure compared to controls. The primary difference was seen in the late portion of the advancing window, in which individuals with DSWPD were exposed to fewer pulses of light of equivalent duration and intensity compared to controls.

Conclusions

Diminished advancing light exposure may play a role in the development and perpetuation of delayed sleep-wake timing in individuals with DSWPD. Enhancing light exposure during the later portion of the advancing window represents an innovative and complementary strategy that has the potential to improve the effectiveness of bright light therapy in DSWPD.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1990
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Author Sletten, T.L.; Cappuccio, F.P.; Davidson, A.J.; Van Cauter, E.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Scheer, F.A.J.L.
Title Health consequences of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep
Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages (up)
Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Chronobiology; Sleep; Review
Abstract The circadian system is key for optimal functioning by maintaining synchrony between internal circadian rhythms, behaviors, and external cues. Many clinicians are not fully aware, however, of the far-reaching implications of the circadian system for human health. Clinical attention to circadian rhythms has largely focused on sleep disturbances. The impact of the circadian system on health is, however, much broader. Clinical diagnoses are often based on single time point assessments during the day, ignoring circadian influences on physiology. Even when time is considered, using (external) clock time ignores the large interindividual differences in internal timing.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31930347 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2822
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