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Author Pereira, É.F.; Louzada, F.M.; Moreno, C.R.C.
Title Not all adolescents are sleep deprived: A study of rural populations: Sleep duration in rural populations Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Sleep and Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue (up) 4 Pages 267-273
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the role of environmental factors in sleep duration among adolescents living in rural areas. A total of 1140 students (569 males), aged 10–19 years, and attending two schools in rural regions in southern Brazil, completed a questionnaire about their sleep habits. Demographic data were also obtained. Prevalence ratios (PR) were estimated for the cases of more than 9 h of sleep on weekdays. Sleep duration in adolescents with and without electric lighting at home was analyzed. Average sleep duration at night was 9.63 (1.64) h on school-going days and 10.14 (2.42) h on weekends. The prevalence of adolescents sleeping for more than 9 h at night on school-going days was 58.3%. Older adolescents showed a tendency to delay their sleep onset times, which is associated with a reduction of sleep duration. Adolescents without electric lighting at home slept longer on school-going days (P < 0.001) and on weekends (P= 0.013) when compared to those with electric lighting at home. From multivariate analysis, age (P < 0.001), school schedule (P= 0.007) and work (0.042) were factors affecting sleep duration. In contrast to the data previously reported for urban populations, we found a high prevalence of adolescents sleeping for more than 9 h on school nights. Data on populations living in less industrialized regions reinforce the idea that technological advances are associated with the negative impact of sleep phase delay in adolescents.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1446-9235 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1482
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Author Juda, M.; Liu-Ambrose, T.; Feldman, F.; Suvagau, C.; Mistlberger, R.E.
Title Light in the Senior Home: Effects of Dynamic and Individual Light Exposure on Sleep, Cognition, and Well-Being Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks Sleep
Volume 2 Issue (up) 4 Pages 557-576
Keywords Human health; aging; circadian rhythms; cognition; entrainment; light; nursing home; sleep
Abstract Disrupted sleep is common among nursing home patients and is associated with cognitive decline and reduced well-being. Sleep disruptions may in part be a result of insufficient daytime light exposure. This pilot study examined the effects of dynamic “circadian” lighting and individual light exposure on sleep, cognitive performance, and well-being in a sample of 14 senior home residents. The study was conducted as a within-subject study design over five weeks of circadian lighting and five weeks of conventional lighting, in a counterbalanced order. Participants wore wrist accelerometers to track rest-activity and light profiles and completed cognitive batteries (National Institute of Health (NIH) toolbox) and questionnaires (depression, fatigue, sleep quality, lighting appraisal) in each condition. We found no significant differences in outcome variables between the two lighting conditions. Individual differences in overall (indoors and outdoors) light exposure levels varied greatly between participants but did not differ between lighting conditions, except at night (22:00-6:00), with maximum light exposure being greater in the conventional lighting condition. Pooled data from both conditions showed that participants with higher overall morning light exposure (6:00-12:00) had less fragmented and more stable rest-activity rhythms with higher relative amplitude. Rest-activity rhythm fragmentation and long sleep duration both uniquely predicted lower cognitive performance.
Address Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33327499; PMCID:PMC7768397 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3261
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Author Chellappa, S.L.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.; Lang, D.; Gotz, T.; Krebs, J.; Cajochen, C.
Title Acute exposure to evening blue-enriched light impacts on human sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Res
Volume 22 Issue (up) 5 Pages 573-580
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light in the short wavelength range (blue light: 446-483 nm) elicits direct effects on human melatonin secretion, alertness and cognitive performance via non-image-forming photoreceptors. However, the impact of blue-enriched polychromatic light on human sleep architecture and sleep electroencephalographic activity remains fairly unknown. In this study we investigated sleep structure and sleep electroencephalographic characteristics of 30 healthy young participants (16 men, 14 women; age range 20-31 years) following 2 h of evening light exposure to polychromatic light at 6500 K, 2500 K and 3000 K. Sleep structure across the first three non-rapid eye movement non-rapid eye movement – rapid eye movement sleep cycles did not differ significantly with respect to the light conditions. All-night non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalographic power density indicated that exposure to light at 6500 K resulted in a tendency for less frontal non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic power density, compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K. The dynamics of non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic slow wave activity (2.0-4.0 Hz), a functional index of homeostatic sleep pressure, were such that slow wave activity was reduced significantly during the first sleep cycle after light at 6500 K compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K, particularly in the frontal derivation. Our data suggest that exposure to blue-enriched polychromatic light at relatively low room light levels impacts upon homeostatic sleep regulation, as indexed by reduction in frontal slow wave activity during the first non-rapid eye movement episode.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-1105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23509952 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2201
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Author Dumont, M.; Beaulieu, C.
Title Light exposure in the natural environment: relevance to mood and sleep disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 8 Issue (up) 6 Pages 557-565
Keywords Human Health; Affect; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; *Light; Mood Disorders/*etiology; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*complications; Wakefulness; Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract In addition to being necessary for vision, light also plays a primary role in circadian physiology. Humans are diurnal animals and their biological clock synchronizes their physiological functions in such a way that functions associated with activity happen in the daytime while functions associated with rest occur at night. A misalignment between the endogenous circadian clock and the desired sleep schedule is the main cause of circadian sleep disorders; it may be involved in certain mood disorders as well. Since light is the main environmental cue used by the biological clock to set its own timing in relation to the day-night cycle, inappropriate light exposure can be involved in the physiopathology of circadian disorders. Conversely, when handled properly, controlled light exposure can be used to treat some mood and sleep disorders. While the earliest studies in the field focused solely on exposure to bright light, contemporary studies aim at understanding how the entire profile of light-dark exposure can influence the circadian clock and, consequently, mood, sleep, and vigilance quality. Following a brief summary of the main concepts underlying the non-visual effects of light, this paper presents some studies using ambulatory measurements of light exposure to illustrate how these concepts apply in real-life situations and discusses the clinical relevance of light exposure in the natural environment for mood, sleep, and circadian disorders.
Address Chronobiology Laboratory, Sacre-Coeur Hospital of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4J 1C5. marie.dumont@umontreal.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17383230 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 736
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Author Skene, D.J.; Arendt, J.
Title Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in the blind and their treatment with melatonin Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume 8 Issue (up) 6 Pages 651-655
Keywords Human Health; Blindness/*complications; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Humans; Melatonin/*administration & dosage; Sleep/drug effects; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*drug therapy/*etiology; Treatment Outcome
Abstract People who are blind, in addition to having to cope with partial or no sight, have an added handicap; the transmission of ocular light from the retina to their circadian clock is impaired. At its worse, for example in people with both eyes enucleated, this lesion results in desynchronisation of the biological clock (located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei) from the 24h day/night environment. While in a desynchronised state, symptoms akin to jet lag are experienced (e.g., daytime sleepiness, poor night sleep, reduced alertness and performance during waking). This is a lifelong condition. Daily administration of exogenous melatonin is the current treatment of choice for this so-called “non-24h sleep/wake disorder”. Melatonin has been shown to correct the underlying circadian rhythm abnormality as well as improve sleep and reduce daytime napping. The effectiveness of melatonin therapy depends upon its time of administration relative to the timing of the person's circadian clock. If practicable, assessment of an individual's circadian phase (by measurement of the endogenous melatonin rhythm in plasma, saliva or urine) is recommended prior to commencing treatment to optimise melatonin's effectiveness.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. d.skene@surrey.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17420154 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 811
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