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Author Paul, M.A.; Love, R.J.; Hawton, A.; Brett, K.; McCreary, D.R.; Arendt, J.
Title Sleep deficits in the high Arctic summer in relation to light exposure and behaviour: use of melatonin as a countermeasure Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (down) Human Health; Sleep
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1093
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Author Peixoto, C.A.T.; da Silva, A.G.T.; Carskadon, M.A.; Louzada, F.M.
Title Adolescents living in homes without electric lighting have earlier sleep times Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Behavioral Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Behav Sleep Med
Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 73-80
Keywords (down) Human Health; Sleep
Abstract The aim of this project was to compare circadian rhythmicity of a group of 37 adolescents (14 girls), aged 11 to 16 (mean age = 13.1 +/- 1.7 years), with and without electricity at home. Twenty students attended morning school (07:30-11:30), and 17 attended evening school classes (19:00-22:30). Eleven adolescents had no electric lighting at home (5 attended morning classes and 6 attended evening classes). They completed a sleep log and wore a wrist actigraph for 5 consecutive days. Saliva samples were collected to assess DLMO. Data were compared by ANOVA and showed later timing and a more extended sleep period for those who attended late classes. Those adolescents without electricity at home had significantly earlier sleep onset on school days. As to DLMO, a trend to a delay was observed in the groups who had electric lighting.
Address Department of Physiology, Universidade Federal do Parana, Brazil. pedatardelli@yahoo.com.br
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1540-2002 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19330580 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1481
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Author Pereira, É.F.; Louzada, F.M.; Moreno, C.R.C.
Title Not all adolescents are sleep deprived: A study of rural populations: Sleep duration in rural populations Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Sleep and Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 267-273
Keywords (down) Human Health; Sleep
Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the role of environmental factors in sleep duration among adolescents living in rural areas. A total of 1140 students (569 males), aged 10–19 years, and attending two schools in rural regions in southern Brazil, completed a questionnaire about their sleep habits. Demographic data were also obtained. Prevalence ratios (PR) were estimated for the cases of more than 9 h of sleep on weekdays. Sleep duration in adolescents with and without electric lighting at home was analyzed. Average sleep duration at night was 9.63 (1.64) h on school-going days and 10.14 (2.42) h on weekends. The prevalence of adolescents sleeping for more than 9 h at night on school-going days was 58.3%. Older adolescents showed a tendency to delay their sleep onset times, which is associated with a reduction of sleep duration. Adolescents without electric lighting at home slept longer on school-going days (P < 0.001) and on weekends (P= 0.013) when compared to those with electric lighting at home. From multivariate analysis, age (P < 0.001), school schedule (P= 0.007) and work (0.042) were factors affecting sleep duration. In contrast to the data previously reported for urban populations, we found a high prevalence of adolescents sleeping for more than 9 h on school nights. Data on populations living in less industrialized regions reinforce the idea that technological advances are associated with the negative impact of sleep phase delay in adolescents.
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ISSN 1446-9235 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1482
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Author Choi, S. J., Park, H. R. & Joo, E. Y.
Title Effects of Light on Daytime Sleep in 12 Hours Night Shift Workers: A Field Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Korean Sleep Research Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-35
Keywords (down) Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Objectives: Night shift workers suffer from sleep and daytime disturbances due to circadian misalignment. To investigate the role of environmental light in daytime sleep following 12 h-night shift work. Methods: we enrolled 12 h-shift female nurses working at one university-affiliated hospital (n=10, mean age 26.6 years, shift work duration 3.8 years). This is a cross-over study to compare sleep between under light exposure (30 lux) and in the dark (<5 lux) following 12 h-night duty. Two sessions of experiments were underwent and the interval between sessions was about a month. Psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) had performed on awakening from sleep at each session and sleep-wake pattern had been monitored by actigraphy throughout the study period. Daytime sleep was also compared with night sleep of age-and gender matched daytime workers (n=10). Results: Sleep parameters and PVT scores were not different between two light conditions. Activities during sleep seemed to be more abundant under 30 lux condition than in the dark, which was not significant. Compared to night sleep, daytime sleep of shift workers was different in terms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Three shift workers showed sleep onset REM sleep and first REM sleep period was the longest during daytime sleep. Conclusions: Unexpectedly, daytime sleep of 12 h night shift workers was well-maintained regardless of light exposure. Early occurrence of REM sleep and shorter sleep latency during daytime sleep suggest that shift workers meet with misalignment of circadian rhythm as well as increased homeostatic sleep pressure drive.
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Language Korean Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2635
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Author Dautovich, N.D.; Schreiber, D.R.; Imel, J.L.; Tighe, C.A.; Shoji, K.D.; Cyrus, J.; Bryant, N.; Lisech, A.; O'Brien, C.; Dzierzewski, J.M.
Title A systematic review of the amount and timing of light in association with objective and subjective sleep outcomes in community-dwelling adults Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sleep Health Abbreviated Journal Sleep Health
Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages 31–48
Keywords (down) Human Health; Review; light timing; Sleep
Abstract Light is considered the dominant environmental cue, or zeitgeber, influencing the sleep-wake cycle. Despite recognizing the importance of light for our well-being, less is known about the specific conditions under which light is optimally associated with better sleep. Therefore, a systematic review was conducted to examine the association between the amount and timing of light exposure in relation to sleep outcomes in healthy, community-dwelling adults. A systematic search was conducted of four databases from database inception to June 2016. In total, 45 studies met the review eligibility criteria with generally high study quality excepting for the specification of eligibility criteria and the justification of sample size. The majority of studies involved experimental manipulation of light (n = 32) vs observational designs (n = 13). Broad trends emerged suggesting that (1) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for objectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to dim (<100 lux) and moderate light (100-1000 lux) and (2) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for subjectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to moderate light (100-1000 lux). Effects due to the amount of light are moderated by the timing of light exposure such that, for objectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter morning and evening light exposure are consistent with a shift in the timing of the sleep period to earlier and later in the day, respectively. For subjectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter light delivered in the morning was associated with self-reported sleep improvements and brighter evening light exposure was associated with worse self-reported sleep.
Address Psychology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 W Franklin St, Room 203, PO Box 842018, Richmond, VA 23284-2018 USA; ndautovich(at)vcu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher National Sleep Foundation Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2352-7218 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2050
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