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Author Ohayon, M.M.; Milesi, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Outdoor Nighttime Lights Associate with Altered Sleep Behavior in the American General Population Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 39 Issue 6 Pages 1311-1320  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Sleep  
  Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVES: Our study aims to explore the associations between outdoor nighttime lights (ONL) and sleep patterns in the human population. METHODS: Cross-sectional telephone study of a representative sample of the general US population age 18 y or older. 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals (participation rate: 83.2%) were interviewed by telephone. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; sleep, mental and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition; International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) Edition). Individuals were geolocated by longitude and latitude. Outdoor nighttime light measurements were obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), with nighttime passes taking place between 19:30 and 22:30 local time. Light data were correlated precisely to the geolocation of each participant of the general population sample. RESULTS: Living in areas with greater ONL was associated with delayed bedtime (P < 0.0001) and wake up time (P < 0.0001), shorter sleep duration (P < 0.01), and increased daytime sleepiness (P < 0.0001). Living in areas with greater ONL also increased the dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and quality (P < 0.0001) and the likelihood of having a diagnostic profile congruent with a circadian rhythm disorder (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Although they improve the overall safety of people and traffic, nighttime lights in our streets and cities are clearly linked with modifications in human sleep behaviors and also impinge on the daytime functioning of individuals living in areas with greater ONL.  
  Address NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27091523; PMCID:PMC4863221 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2551  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bedroom lighting environment and incident diabetes mellitus: a longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine  
  Volume 65 Issue Pages 1-3  
  Keywords Human Health; Metabolic disorders; diabetes; geriatrics  
  Abstract Objectives

Light information received by the brain influences human circadian timing and metabolism; low-level light at night (LAN) significantly increased body mass and led to prediabetes in mice. We hypothesized that LAN exposure increases the diabetes risk in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a longitudinal association between LAN exposure and the incidence of diabetes in a general population.

Methods

In our prospective cohort study, bedroom light intensity was measured at 1-min intervals in 678 elderly participants without diabetes at baseline. The average light intensity recorded between bedtimes and rise times over two consecutive nights was used in the analysis.

Results

During follow-up (median, 42 months), 19 of the 678 participants (mean age, 70.6 years) developed diabetes. Poisson regression models revealed that the incidence rate for diabetes was significantly higher in the LAN group (average ≥5 lux, N = 128) than the dark group (average <5 lux, N = 550) (incidence rate ratio, 3.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.55–9.05; p=0.003). Further propensity score adjustments in relation to LAN produced consistent results (incidence rate ratio, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.38–7.35; p=0.007). When the cut-off value of LAN was decreased to 3 lux, the relationship remained significant (incidence rate ratio 2.74; 95% CI, 1.19–6.33; p=0.018).

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that LAN exposure increases the incidence of diabetes in a general elderly population. Further research involving a large cohort with new-onset diabetes is warranted to elucidate these findings.
 
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan; obayashi(at)naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2605  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Savarese, M.; Di Perri, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Excessive sleepiness in shift work disorder: a narrative review of the last 5 years Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung Abbreviated Journal Sleep Breath  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Human Health; Alertness; Armodafinil; Insomnia; Performance; Shift work disorder; excessive sleepiness; StimulaCentral Nervous System Stimulants; Review  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Shift work sleep disorder (SWSD), also known as shift work disorder (SWD), is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness, associated with a recurring work schedule that overlaps the usual time designated for sleeping. PURPOSE: This article aims to provide a narrative review of the pharmacological trials conducted on SWD in the last 5 years, to better address safety and health issues inherent to this disorder. METHODS: An electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed. All eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cross-over RCTs with employees undertaking shift work (including night shifts) were considered, yielding three articles. RESULTS: All three studies showed the efficacy of armodafinil in improving subjective and objective sleepiness, clinical conditions, and global functioning regardless of shift duration. Both performance and driving simulator performance tests administered during the night shift bore better results following armodafinil administration than after placebo. However, armodafinil only reduced subjective disability in individuals working more than 9 h; furthermore, even after armodafinil, alertness was reduced but not normalized. CONCLUSION: These studies underscore the importance of preventing and/or minimizing disturbances due to shift work. This may be achieved through various strategies, such as the employer's commitment to adopt ergonomic criteria in shift design and to implement work-environment interventions like controlled bright light. Health personnel is of pivotal importance to detect potential factors of intolerance to shift work or early symptoms of SWD. Additional and improved studies are needed to further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.  
  Address Center of Sleep Medicine, UOSD of Neurophysiopathology and Disorders of Movement, AOU G Martino, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, 98121, Messina, Italy. mdiperri@wesleyan.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1520-9512 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31471831 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2662  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sletten, T.L.; Cappuccio, F.P.; Davidson, A.J.; Van Cauter, E.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Scheer, F.A.J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Health consequences of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Chronobiology; Sleep; Review  
  Abstract The circadian system is key for optimal functioning by maintaining synchrony between internal circadian rhythms, behaviors, and external cues. Many clinicians are not fully aware, however, of the far-reaching implications of the circadian system for human health. Clinical attention to circadian rhythms has largely focused on sleep disturbances. The impact of the circadian system on health is, however, much broader. Clinical diagnoses are often based on single time point assessments during the day, ignoring circadian influences on physiology. Even when time is considered, using (external) clock time ignores the large interindividual differences in internal timing.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31930347 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2822  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Komada, Y.; Aoki, K.; Gohshi, S.; Ichioka, H.; Shibata, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of television luminance and wavelength at habitual bedtime on melatonin and cortisol secretion in humans: Blue light and melatonin secretion Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Sleep and Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Sleep and Biological Rhythms  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 316–322  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exposure to different types of television displays at habitual bedtime on human melatonin and cortisol secretion. Thirteen male participants (mean age: 22.7 ± 0.85 years) were tested over three nights in one baseline and two experimental sessions. Participants were instructed to watch a movie on four different luminance- and wavelength-controlled television displays: normal luminance (450 candela [cd]/m2) or high luminance (1200&#8201;cd/m2) and normal blue light or half blue light. Salivary melatonin and cortisol levels were measured at two time points before and after television viewing. There was no significant difference in cortisol secretion due to the different displays. Melatonin suppression was significantly lower following the exposure to the half-blue light display compared with the normal blue light display. These results suggest that the use of half-blue light displays during night time may prevent circadian rhythm dysfunction.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (down) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1446-9235 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1149  
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