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Author Panagiotou, M.; Rohling, J.H.T.; Deboer, T.
Title Sleep Network Deterioration as a Function of Dim-Light-At-Night Exposure Duration in a Mouse Model Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 308-324
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light, despite its widespread and valuable use, has been associated withdeterioration of health and well-being, including altered circadian timing and sleep disturbances,particularly in nocturnal exposure. Recent findings from our lab reveal significant sleep andsleep electroencephalogram (EEG) changes owing to three months exposure to dim-light-at-night(DLAN). Aiming to further explore the detrimental effects of DLAN exposure, in the present study,we continuously recorded sleep EEG and the electromyogram for baseline 24-h and following 6-h sleepdeprivation in a varied DLAN duration scheme. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to a 12:12 h light:DLANcycle (75lux:5lux) vs. a 12:12 h light:dark cycle (75lux:0lux) for one day, one week, and one month.Our results show that sleep was already affected by a mere day of DLAN exposure with additionalcomplications emerging with increasing DLAN exposure duration, such as the gradual delay ofthe daily 24-h vigilance state rhythms. We conducted detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) on thelocomotor activity data following 1-month and 3-month DLAN exposure, and a significantly lesshealthy rest-activity pattern, based on the decreased alpha values, was found in both conditionscompared to the control light-dark. Taking into account the behavioral, sleep and the sleep EEGparameters, our data suggest that DLAN exposure, even in the shortest duration, induces deleteriouseffects; nevertheless, potential compensatory mechanisms render the organism partly adjustable andable to cope. We think that, for this reason, our data do not always depict linear divergence amonggroups, as compared with control conditions. Chronic DLAN exposure impacts the sleep regulatorysystem, but also brain integrity, diminishing its adaptability and reactivity, especially apparent in thesleep EEG alterations and particular low alpha values following DFA.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3078
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Author Juda, M.; Liu-Ambrose, T.; Feldman, F.; Suvagau, C.; Mistlberger, R.E.
Title Light in the Senior Home: Effects of Dynamic and Individual Light Exposure on Sleep, Cognition, and Well-Being Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks Sleep
Volume 2 Issue 4 Pages 557-576
Keywords Human health; aging; circadian rhythms; cognition; entrainment; light; nursing home; sleep
Abstract Disrupted sleep is common among nursing home patients and is associated with cognitive decline and reduced well-being. Sleep disruptions may in part be a result of insufficient daytime light exposure. This pilot study examined the effects of dynamic “circadian” lighting and individual light exposure on sleep, cognitive performance, and well-being in a sample of 14 senior home residents. The study was conducted as a within-subject study design over five weeks of circadian lighting and five weeks of conventional lighting, in a counterbalanced order. Participants wore wrist accelerometers to track rest-activity and light profiles and completed cognitive batteries (National Institute of Health (NIH) toolbox) and questionnaires (depression, fatigue, sleep quality, lighting appraisal) in each condition. We found no significant differences in outcome variables between the two lighting conditions. Individual differences in overall (indoors and outdoors) light exposure levels varied greatly between participants but did not differ between lighting conditions, except at night (22:00-6:00), with maximum light exposure being greater in the conventional lighting condition. Pooled data from both conditions showed that participants with higher overall morning light exposure (6:00-12:00) had less fragmented and more stable rest-activity rhythms with higher relative amplitude. Rest-activity rhythm fragmentation and long sleep duration both uniquely predicted lower cognitive performance.
Address Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33327499; PMCID:PMC7768397 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3261
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Author Woods, H. C., & Scott, H.
Title Merging the Biological and Cognitive Processes of Sleep and Screens Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Sleep Medicine Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 150-155
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Purpose of Review

Screens are a permanent feature of life today and we have reached an interesting juncture with different research agendas investigating the biological and cognitive aspects of screen use separately. This review argues that it is timely and indeed essential that we bring together these research areas to fully understand both positive and negative aspects of screen use.

Recent Findings

More recent work is starting to take a more cohesive approach to understanding how device use pre-bedtime can impact our sleep by including both light and content in their experimental protocols which is a welcome development leading to a more nuanced understanding of both biological and cognitive processes.

Summary

We call for an open and collaborative approach to gain momentum in this direction of acknowledging both biological and cognitive factors enabling us to understand the relative impacts of both whilst using screens with regard to both light and content.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2640
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Author Yates, J.
Title Perspective: The Long-Term Effects of Light Exposure on Establishment of Newborn Circadian Rhythm Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm
Volume 14 Issue 10 Pages 1829-1830
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Development of newborns continues postnatally. Evidence has accumulated on the early life programming effects of light exposure on the maturing visual axis and the developing circadian rhythm. Consideration of the effects of light at night and insufficient light during the day should occur when giving anticipatory guidance in the care of newborn infants. Long-term health consequences of light imprinting may occur with inappropriate light-dark environments during the newborn period.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2032
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Author Min, J.-young; Min, K.-bok
Title Outdoor Artificial Nighttime Light and Use of Hypnotic Medications in Older Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm
Volume 14 Issue 11 Pages 1903-1910
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract Study Objectives

Outdoor artificial nighttime light is increasingly recognized as a form of environmental pollution. Excessive nighttime light exposure, whether from indoor or outdoor sources, has been associated with a number of deleterious effects on human health. We performed a population-based cohort study in South Korea to assess the possible association between outdoor nocturnal lighting and insomnia in older adults, as measured by prescriptions for hypnotic drugs.

Methods

This study used data from the 2002–2013 National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC), and a total of 52,027 adults who were age 60 years or older were included in the study. Light data were based on satellite mapping of artificial light. The usage data of two hypnotic drugs, zolpidem (N05CF02) and triazolam (N05CD05), were extracted from the NHIS-NSC records.

Results

Of the 52,027 patients in this cohort, 11,738 (22%) had prescriptions for hypnotic drugs. Increasing outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure (stratified by quartile) was associated with an increased prevalence of hypnotic prescriptions and daily dose intake. Compared with individuals in the lowest quartile 1, the regression coefficients for prescription days and daily defined doses of all hypnotic drugs and certain hypotonic drugs were significantly higher among those living in areas with higher outdoor artificial nighttime light (quartiles 2 through 4).

Conclusions

Outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure was significantly associated with prescription of hypnotic drugs in older adults. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that outdoor artificial nighttime light may cause sleep disturbances.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2060
Permanent link to this record