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Author Mottram, V.; Middleton, B.; Williams, P.; Arendt, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of bright artificial white and 'blue-enriched' light on sleep and circadian phase during the polar winter Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication (up) Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Res  
  Volume 20 Issue 1 Pt 2 Pages 154-161  
  Keywords Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; *Cold Climate; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Medical Records; Questionnaires; Sleep/*physiology; Time Factors; blue light  
  Abstract Delayed sleep phase (and sometimes free-run) is common in the Antarctic winter (no natural sunlight) and optimizing the artificial light conditions is desirable. This project evaluated sleep when using 17,000 K blue-enriched lamps compared with standard white lamps (5000 K) for personal and communal illumination. Base personnel, 10 males, five females, 32.5+/-8 years took part in the study. From 24 March to 21 September 2006 light exposure alternated between 4-5-week periods of standard white (5000 K) and blue-enriched lamps (17,000 K), with a 3-week control before and after extra light. Sleep and light exposure were assessed by actigraphy and sleep diaries. General health (RAND 36-item questionnaire) and circadian phase (urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythm) were evaluated at the end of each light condition. Direct comparison (rmanova) of blue-enriched light with white light showed that sleep onset was earlier by 19 min (P=0.022), and sleep latency tended to be shorter by 4 min (P=0.065) with blue-enriched light. Analysing all light conditions, control, blue and white, again provided evidence for greater efficiency of blue-enriched light compared with white (P<0.05), but with the best sleep timing, duration, efficiency and quality in control natural light conditions. Circadian phase was earlier on average in midwinter blue compared with midwinter white light by 45 min (P<0.05). Light condition had no influence on general health. We conclude that the use of blue-enriched light had some beneficial effects, notably earlier sleep, compared with standard white light during the polar winter.  
  Address British Antarctic Survey Medical Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-1105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20723022 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 348  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Middleton, B.; Arendt, J.; Stone, BM url  openurl
  Title Human circadian rhythms in constant dim light (8 lux) with knowledge of clock time Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication (up) Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J. Sleep Res.  
  Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 69-76  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian rhythm; light/dark cycle; melatonin; entrainment; melatonin levels; 6-sulphatoxymelatonin  
  Abstract The light/dark (L/D) cycle is a major synchronizer of human circadian rhythms. In the absence of a strong L/D cycle, synchrony with 24 hours can nevertheless be maintained in a socially structured environment, as shown in Polar regions (Broadway et al. 1987) and by some blind subjects (Czeisler et al. 1995a). The relative contribution of other time cues to entrainment in dim light has not been fully explored. The present study investigated the behaviour of melatonin (assessed as 6-sulphatoxymelatonin); rectal temperature; activity and sleep (actigraphy and logs) in constant dim light (L/ L) with access to a digital clock. 6 normal healthy males were maintained as a group in partial temporal isolation with attenuated sound and ambient temperature for 21 days. All 6 subjects showed free-running periodicity for 6-sulphatoxymelatonin and 5/6 subjects for temperature, activity and sleep offset. The average period (tau) was 24.26 +/- 0.049, substantially shorter than in previous experiments with a self selected L/D cycle but similar to a recent study conducted in very dim light. One subject maintained a rigid sleep/wake cycle throughout whilst his 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythm free-ran. Total sleep time, from actigraph data, did not change but sleep efficiency decreased during the experiment. The subjects did not show group synchronization. These results confirm previous data indicating the importance of the L/D cycle in human entrainment and underline the lesser role of social cues and knowledge of clock time. This particular approach will permit the administration of timed medication to sighted humans under free-running conditions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1098  
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Author Chellappa, S.L.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.; Lang, D.; Gotz, T.; Krebs, J.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acute exposure to evening blue-enriched light impacts on human sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Res  
  Volume 22 Issue 5 Pages 573-580  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Light in the short wavelength range (blue light: 446-483 nm) elicits direct effects on human melatonin secretion, alertness and cognitive performance via non-image-forming photoreceptors. However, the impact of blue-enriched polychromatic light on human sleep architecture and sleep electroencephalographic activity remains fairly unknown. In this study we investigated sleep structure and sleep electroencephalographic characteristics of 30 healthy young participants (16 men, 14 women; age range 20-31 years) following 2 h of evening light exposure to polychromatic light at 6500 K, 2500 K and 3000 K. Sleep structure across the first three non-rapid eye movement non-rapid eye movement – rapid eye movement sleep cycles did not differ significantly with respect to the light conditions. All-night non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalographic power density indicated that exposure to light at 6500 K resulted in a tendency for less frontal non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic power density, compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K. The dynamics of non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic slow wave activity (2.0-4.0 Hz), a functional index of homeostatic sleep pressure, were such that slow wave activity was reduced significantly during the first sleep cycle after light at 6500 K compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K, particularly in the frontal derivation. Our data suggest that exposure to blue-enriched polychromatic light at relatively low room light levels impacts upon homeostatic sleep regulation, as indexed by reduction in frontal slow wave activity during the first non-rapid eye movement episode.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-1105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23509952 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2201  
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Author Choi, S. J., Park, H. R. & Joo, E. Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Light on Daytime Sleep in 12 Hours Night Shift Workers: A Field Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Korean Sleep Research Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-35  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract Objectives: Night shift workers suffer from sleep and daytime disturbances due to circadian misalignment. To investigate the role of environmental light in daytime sleep following 12 h-night shift work. Methods: we enrolled 12 h-shift female nurses working at one university-affiliated hospital (n=10, mean age 26.6 years, shift work duration 3.8 years). This is a cross-over study to compare sleep between under light exposure (30 lux) and in the dark (<5 lux) following 12 h-night duty. Two sessions of experiments were underwent and the interval between sessions was about a month. Psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) had performed on awakening from sleep at each session and sleep-wake pattern had been monitored by actigraphy throughout the study period. Daytime sleep was also compared with night sleep of age-and gender matched daytime workers (n=10). Results: Sleep parameters and PVT scores were not different between two light conditions. Activities during sleep seemed to be more abundant under 30 lux condition than in the dark, which was not significant. Compared to night sleep, daytime sleep of shift workers was different in terms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Three shift workers showed sleep onset REM sleep and first REM sleep period was the longest during daytime sleep. Conclusions: Unexpectedly, daytime sleep of 12 h night shift workers was well-maintained regardless of light exposure. Early occurrence of REM sleep and shorter sleep latency during daytime sleep suggest that shift workers meet with misalignment of circadian rhythm as well as increased homeostatic sleep pressure drive.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Korean Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2635  
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Author Smith, M.R.; Eastman, C.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shift work: health, performance and safety problems, traditional countermeasures, and innovative management strategies to reduce circadian misalignment Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (up) Nature and Science of Sleep Abbreviated Journal Nat Sci Sleep  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages 111-132  
  Keywords bright light; circadian rhythms; melatonin; night work; phase-shifting; sleep  
  Abstract There are three mechanisms that may contribute to the health, performance, and safety problems associated with night-shift work: (1) circadian misalignment between the internal circadian clock and activities such as work, sleep, and eating, (2) chronic, partial sleep deprivation, and (3) melatonin suppression by light at night. The typical countermeasures, such as caffeine, naps, and melatonin (for its sleep-promoting effect), along with education about sleep and circadian rhythms, are the components of most fatigue risk-management plans. We contend that these, while better than nothing, are not enough because they do not address the underlying cause of the problems, which is circadian misalignment. We explain how to reset (phase-shift) the circadian clock to partially align with the night-work, day-sleep schedule, and thus reduce circadian misalignment while preserving sleep and functioning on days off. This involves controlling light and dark using outdoor light exposure, sunglasses, sleep in the dark, and a little bright light during night work. We present a diagram of a sleep-and-light schedule to reduce circadian misalignment in permanent night work, or a rotation between evenings and nights, and give practical advice on how to implement this type of plan.  
  Address Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1179-1608 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23620685; PMCID:PMC3630978 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 149  
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