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Author Choi, S. J., Park, H. R. & Joo, E. Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Light on Daytime Sleep in 12 Hours Night Shift Workers: A Field Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Korean Sleep Research Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-35  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract Objectives: Night shift workers suffer from sleep and daytime disturbances due to circadian misalignment. To investigate the role of environmental light in daytime sleep following 12 h-night shift work. Methods: we enrolled 12 h-shift female nurses working at one university-affiliated hospital (n=10, mean age 26.6 years, shift work duration 3.8 years). This is a cross-over study to compare sleep between under light exposure (30 lux) and in the dark (<5 lux) following 12 h-night duty. Two sessions of experiments were underwent and the interval between sessions was about a month. Psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) had performed on awakening from sleep at each session and sleep-wake pattern had been monitored by actigraphy throughout the study period. Daytime sleep was also compared with night sleep of age-and gender matched daytime workers (n=10). Results: Sleep parameters and PVT scores were not different between two light conditions. Activities during sleep seemed to be more abundant under 30 lux condition than in the dark, which was not significant. Compared to night sleep, daytime sleep of shift workers was different in terms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Three shift workers showed sleep onset REM sleep and first REM sleep period was the longest during daytime sleep. Conclusions: Unexpectedly, daytime sleep of 12 h night shift workers was well-maintained regardless of light exposure. Early occurrence of REM sleep and shorter sleep latency during daytime sleep suggest that shift workers meet with misalignment of circadian rhythm as well as increased homeostatic sleep pressure drive.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Korean Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2635  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bedroom lighting environment and incident diabetes mellitus: a longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine  
  Volume 65 Issue Pages 1-3  
  Keywords Human Health; Metabolic disorders; diabetes; geriatrics  
  Abstract Objectives

Light information received by the brain influences human circadian timing and metabolism; low-level light at night (LAN) significantly increased body mass and led to prediabetes in mice. We hypothesized that LAN exposure increases the diabetes risk in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a longitudinal association between LAN exposure and the incidence of diabetes in a general population.

Methods

In our prospective cohort study, bedroom light intensity was measured at 1-min intervals in 678 elderly participants without diabetes at baseline. The average light intensity recorded between bedtimes and rise times over two consecutive nights was used in the analysis.

Results

During follow-up (median, 42 months), 19 of the 678 participants (mean age, 70.6 years) developed diabetes. Poisson regression models revealed that the incidence rate for diabetes was significantly higher in the LAN group (average ≥5 lux, N = 128) than the dark group (average <5 lux, N = 550) (incidence rate ratio, 3.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.55–9.05; p=0.003). Further propensity score adjustments in relation to LAN produced consistent results (incidence rate ratio, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.38–7.35; p=0.007). When the cut-off value of LAN was decreased to 3 lux, the relationship remained significant (incidence rate ratio 2.74; 95% CI, 1.19–6.33; p=0.018).

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that LAN exposure increases the incidence of diabetes in a general elderly population. Further research involving a large cohort with new-onset diabetes is warranted to elucidate these findings.
 
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan; obayashi(at)naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2605  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ohayon, M.M.; Milesi, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Outdoor Nighttime Lights Associate with Altered Sleep Behavior in the American General Population Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 39 Issue 6 Pages 1311-1320  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Sleep  
  Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVES: Our study aims to explore the associations between outdoor nighttime lights (ONL) and sleep patterns in the human population. METHODS: Cross-sectional telephone study of a representative sample of the general US population age 18 y or older. 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals (participation rate: 83.2%) were interviewed by telephone. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; sleep, mental and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition; International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) Edition). Individuals were geolocated by longitude and latitude. Outdoor nighttime light measurements were obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), with nighttime passes taking place between 19:30 and 22:30 local time. Light data were correlated precisely to the geolocation of each participant of the general population sample. RESULTS: Living in areas with greater ONL was associated with delayed bedtime (P < 0.0001) and wake up time (P < 0.0001), shorter sleep duration (P < 0.01), and increased daytime sleepiness (P < 0.0001). Living in areas with greater ONL also increased the dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and quality (P < 0.0001) and the likelihood of having a diagnostic profile congruent with a circadian rhythm disorder (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Although they improve the overall safety of people and traffic, nighttime lights in our streets and cities are clearly linked with modifications in human sleep behaviors and also impinge on the daytime functioning of individuals living in areas with greater ONL.  
  Address NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27091523; PMCID:PMC4863221 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2551  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dhaliwal, S.S.; Keller, J.; Le, H.-N.; Lewin, D.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Disturbance among Pregnant Women: The Influence of Environmental and Contextual Factors Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A270-A271  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Introduction

Disrupted sleep during pregnancy affects nearly 85% of women. This can contribute to psychological distress and antenatal depression. The aims of the current project were to test whether (a) poorer subjective sleep quality contributed to greater depression and anxiety symptoms, and (b) contextual factors predicted clinically significant sleep disturbance after adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods

In a mixed-methods study, 418 pregnant women (age: M=32.4 years; gestation: M=28.4 weeks, SD=8.4 weeks; 58% Black) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), measures of pregnancy-related physiological factors, and provided details about their sleep environment. They also rated perinatal depression, anxiety, and SES (Hollingshead and MacArthur Ladder). Sixty-two women completed these measures again later in pregnancy (gestation M = 34.2 weeks). A subset of seven women underwent actigraphy (9-nights) during their third trimester. Logistic regressions adjusted for age, BMI, race, sleep disordered breathing, and gestational week.

Results

Subjective sleep quality was significantly poorer among Black women and those with higher BMI. Physiological factors (i.e., restless leg syndrome, nocturnal urination, and acid reflux) explained subjective sleep disturbance after accounting for gestational week (ps<.01). Among women with history of psychopathology (n=221), sleep disturbance was significantly related to anxiety and depression symptoms (ps<.01), with greater sleep disturbance (PSQI score >5) predicting clinically significant antenatal depression (B = .38, p<.05). However, those who rated their social standing as higher reported lower sleep disturbance throughout pregnancy, even after adjusting for mood and anxiety (B= .86, SE =.41; p<.05). There was a dose-response positive association between sleep disturbance and depression severity among Black women only (B = .89; p<.05). Among lower SES Black women, environmental factors (greater ambient noise and light pollution) partially mediated this effect (B= .45, SE =.17; p<.01).

Conclusion

Sociocontextual factors may explain sleep disturbance severity among low-income pregnant Black women, above and beyond traditional metrics of SES. Higher subjective SES may be protective against sleep disturbance and psychiatric distress. Assessments of sleep during pregnancy should account for physiological considerations and environmental disruptions, alongside mood and anxiety.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2323  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mindel, J.W.; Rojas, S.L.; Kline, D.; Bao, S.; Rezai, A.; Corrigan, J.D.; Nelson, R.J.; D, P.; Magalang, U.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title 0038 Sleeping with Low Levels of Artificial Light at Night Increases Systemic Inflammation in Humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A15-A16  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Introduction

Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a ubiquitous part of our society. Animal studies have shown that ALAN exposure promotes a depressive-like mood and increases peripheral inflammation likely due to circadian disruption. We hypothesized that sleeping with ALAN will increase systemic inflammation in humans.

Methods

We enrolled 64 subjects [32 with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) adherent to treatment and 32 without sleep disorders] in a randomized, crossover study to determine the effects of sleeping with ALAN (40 lux) or the usual dark condition (control) for 7 nights at home. Sleeping with ALAN was confirmed by an actigraph with an ambient light sensor. Outcome measurements were done at baseline and after sleeping in each condition. The primary outcome was changes in the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels. Secondary outcomes include scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-10 (FOSQ-10), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS); Psychomotor Vigilance Testing (PVT); actigraphic sleep measures; and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A random effects linear regression model was used to assess differences adjusting for schedule, visit, and baseline levels. Post-hoc analyses combined results from OSA and non-OSA subjects.

Results

Fifty-eight (30 OSA and 28 non-OSA) subjects, aged 38.4±14.9 years, 33 of whom are male completed the protocol. A log transformation was used so the difference in hsCRP was expressed as a mean ratio. In the combined analysis, the mean hsCRP was 39% higher with ALAN than control (mean ratio=1.39; 95% CI: 1.08-1.80; p=0.012). The effects of ALAN for OSA and non-OSA subjects were not different. ALAN increased the CES-D score by 1.81 (p=0.017) and ESS score by 0.62 (p=0.071) points, and decreased the FOSQ-10 score by 0.36 (p=0.038) points while the PSQI score was unchanged (p=0.860). There were no significant differences in the PVT values, actigraphic sleep measures, or HOMA-IR.

Conclusion

Sleeping with ALAN for seven days significantly increased hsCRP levels and modestly increased depression scores in humans.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2322  
Permanent link to this record
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