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Author Dhaliwal, S.S.; Keller, J.; Le, H.-N.; Lewin, D.S.
Title (up) Sleep Disturbance among Pregnant Women: The Influence of Environmental and Contextual Factors Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal
Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A270-A271
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Introduction

Disrupted sleep during pregnancy affects nearly 85% of women. This can contribute to psychological distress and antenatal depression. The aims of the current project were to test whether (a) poorer subjective sleep quality contributed to greater depression and anxiety symptoms, and (b) contextual factors predicted clinically significant sleep disturbance after adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods

In a mixed-methods study, 418 pregnant women (age: M=32.4 years; gestation: M=28.4 weeks, SD=8.4 weeks; 58% Black) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), measures of pregnancy-related physiological factors, and provided details about their sleep environment. They also rated perinatal depression, anxiety, and SES (Hollingshead and MacArthur Ladder). Sixty-two women completed these measures again later in pregnancy (gestation M = 34.2 weeks). A subset of seven women underwent actigraphy (9-nights) during their third trimester. Logistic regressions adjusted for age, BMI, race, sleep disordered breathing, and gestational week.

Results

Subjective sleep quality was significantly poorer among Black women and those with higher BMI. Physiological factors (i.e., restless leg syndrome, nocturnal urination, and acid reflux) explained subjective sleep disturbance after accounting for gestational week (ps<.01). Among women with history of psychopathology (n=221), sleep disturbance was significantly related to anxiety and depression symptoms (ps<.01), with greater sleep disturbance (PSQI score >5) predicting clinically significant antenatal depression (B = .38, p<.05). However, those who rated their social standing as higher reported lower sleep disturbance throughout pregnancy, even after adjusting for mood and anxiety (B= .86, SE =.41; p<.05). There was a dose-response positive association between sleep disturbance and depression severity among Black women only (B = .89; p<.05). Among lower SES Black women, environmental factors (greater ambient noise and light pollution) partially mediated this effect (B= .45, SE =.17; p<.01).

Conclusion

Sociocontextual factors may explain sleep disturbance severity among low-income pregnant Black women, above and beyond traditional metrics of SES. Higher subjective SES may be protective against sleep disturbance and psychiatric distress. Assessments of sleep during pregnancy should account for physiological considerations and environmental disruptions, alongside mood and anxiety.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2323
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Author Kessel, L.; Siganos, G.; Jorgensen, T.; Larsen, M.
Title (up) Sleep disturbances are related to decreased transmission of blue light to the retina caused by lens yellowing Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep
Volume 34 Issue 9 Pages 1215-1219
Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aging/*pathology/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Fluorometry; Humans; Lens, Crystalline/*pathology/physiopathology; *Light; Male; Middle Aged; Retina/*physiopathology; Risk Factors; *Scattering, Radiation; Sleep Disorders/*etiology; Circadian rhythm; cataract; melanopsin; sleep; blue light
Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleep pattern and circadian rhythms are regulated via the retinohypothalamic tract in response to stimulation of a subset of retinal ganglion cells, predominantly by blue light (450-490 nm). With age, the transmission of blue light to the retina is reduced because of the aging process of the human lens, and this may impair the photoentrainment of circadian rhythm leading to sleep disorders. The aim of the study was to examine the association between lens aging and sleep disorders. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population based study. SETTING: The study was performed at the Research Center for Prevention and Health, Glostrup Hospital, Denmark and at the Department of Ophthalmology, Herlev Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: An age- and sex-stratified sample of 970 persons aged 30 to 60 years of age drawn from a sample randomly selected from the background population. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Sleep disturbances were evaluated by a combination of questionnaire and the use of prescription sleeping medication. Lens aging (transmission and yellowing) was measured objectively by lens autofluorometry. The risk of sleep disturbances was significantly increased when the transmission of blue light to the retina was low, even after correction for the effect of age and other confounding factors such as smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, gender, and the risk of ischemic heart disease (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Filtration of blue light by the aging lens was significantly associated with an increased risk of sleep disturbances. We propose that this is a result of disturbance of photoentrainment of circadian rhythms.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. line.kessel@dadlnet.dk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21886359; PMCID:PMC3157663 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 344
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Author Panagiotou, M.; Rohling, J.H.T.; Deboer, T.
Title (up) Sleep Network Deterioration as a Function of Dim-Light-At-Night Exposure Duration in a Mouse Model Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 308-324
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light, despite its widespread and valuable use, has been associated withdeterioration of health and well-being, including altered circadian timing and sleep disturbances,particularly in nocturnal exposure. Recent findings from our lab reveal significant sleep andsleep electroencephalogram (EEG) changes owing to three months exposure to dim-light-at-night(DLAN). Aiming to further explore the detrimental effects of DLAN exposure, in the present study,we continuously recorded sleep EEG and the electromyogram for baseline 24-h and following 6-h sleepdeprivation in a varied DLAN duration scheme. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to a 12:12 h light:DLANcycle (75lux:5lux) vs. a 12:12 h light:dark cycle (75lux:0lux) for one day, one week, and one month.Our results show that sleep was already affected by a mere day of DLAN exposure with additionalcomplications emerging with increasing DLAN exposure duration, such as the gradual delay ofthe daily 24-h vigilance state rhythms. We conducted detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) on thelocomotor activity data following 1-month and 3-month DLAN exposure, and a significantly lesshealthy rest-activity pattern, based on the decreased alpha values, was found in both conditionscompared to the control light-dark. Taking into account the behavioral, sleep and the sleep EEGparameters, our data suggest that DLAN exposure, even in the shortest duration, induces deleteriouseffects; nevertheless, potential compensatory mechanisms render the organism partly adjustable andable to cope. We think that, for this reason, our data do not always depict linear divergence amonggroups, as compared with control conditions. Chronic DLAN exposure impacts the sleep regulatorysystem, but also brain integrity, diminishing its adaptability and reactivity, especially apparent in thesleep EEG alterations and particular low alpha values following DFA.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3078
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Author Mottram, V.; Middleton, B.; Williams, P.; Arendt, J.
Title (up) The impact of bright artificial white and 'blue-enriched' light on sleep and circadian phase during the polar winter Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Res
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pt 2 Pages 154-161
Keywords Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; *Cold Climate; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Medical Records; Questionnaires; Sleep/*physiology; Time Factors; blue light
Abstract Delayed sleep phase (and sometimes free-run) is common in the Antarctic winter (no natural sunlight) and optimizing the artificial light conditions is desirable. This project evaluated sleep when using 17,000 K blue-enriched lamps compared with standard white lamps (5000 K) for personal and communal illumination. Base personnel, 10 males, five females, 32.5+/-8 years took part in the study. From 24 March to 21 September 2006 light exposure alternated between 4-5-week periods of standard white (5000 K) and blue-enriched lamps (17,000 K), with a 3-week control before and after extra light. Sleep and light exposure were assessed by actigraphy and sleep diaries. General health (RAND 36-item questionnaire) and circadian phase (urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythm) were evaluated at the end of each light condition. Direct comparison (rmanova) of blue-enriched light with white light showed that sleep onset was earlier by 19 min (P=0.022), and sleep latency tended to be shorter by 4 min (P=0.065) with blue-enriched light. Analysing all light conditions, control, blue and white, again provided evidence for greater efficiency of blue-enriched light compared with white (P<0.05), but with the best sleep timing, duration, efficiency and quality in control natural light conditions. Circadian phase was earlier on average in midwinter blue compared with midwinter white light by 45 min (P<0.05). Light condition had no influence on general health. We conclude that the use of blue-enriched light had some beneficial effects, notably earlier sleep, compared with standard white light during the polar winter.
Address British Antarctic Survey Medical Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-1105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20723022 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 348
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Author Lack, L.C.; Gradisar, M.; Van Someren, E.J.W.; Wright, H.R.; Lushington, K.
Title (up) The relationship between insomnia and body temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Sleep Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med Rev
Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 307-317
Keywords Human Health; Arousal/physiology; Body Temperature Regulation/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Homeostasis/physiology; Humans; Melatonin/blood; Phototherapy; Skin Temperature/physiology; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/physiopathology/therapy; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/*physiopathology/therapy; Sympathetic Nervous System/physiopathology; Wakefulness/physiology
Abstract Sleepiness and sleep propensity are strongly influenced by our circadian clock as indicated by many circadian rhythms, most commonly by that of core body temperature. Sleep is most conducive in the temperature minimum phase, but is inhibited in a “wake maintenance zone” before the minimum phase, and is disrupted in a zone following that phase. Different types of insomnia symptoms have been associated with abnormalities of the body temperature rhythm. Sleep onset insomnia is associated with a delayed temperature rhythm presumably, at least partly, because sleep is attempted during a delayed evening wake maintenance zone. Morning bright light has been used to phase advance circadian rhythms and successfully treat sleep onset insomnia. Conversely, early morning awakening insomnia has been associated with a phase advanced temperature rhythm and has been successfully treated with the phase delaying effects of evening bright light. Sleep maintenance insomnia has been associated not with a circadian rhythm timing abnormality, but with nocturnally elevated core body temperature. Combination of sleep onset and maintenance insomnia has been associated with a 24-h elevation of core body temperature supporting the chronic hyper-arousal model of insomnia. The possibility that these last two types of insomnia may be related to impaired thermoregulation, particularly a reduced ability to dissipate body heat from distal skin areas, has not been consistently supported in laboratory studies. Further studies of thermoregulation are needed in the typical home environment in which the insomnia is most evident.
Address School of Psychology, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia. leon.lack@flinders.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1087-0792 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18603220 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 775
Permanent link to this record