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Author Paul, M.A.; Love, R.J.; Hawton, A.; Brett, K.; McCreary, D.R.; Arendt, J.
Title Sleep deficits in the high Arctic summer in relation to light exposure and behaviour: use of melatonin as a countermeasure Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1093
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Author Wilson IV, J.; Reid, K.J.; Braun, R.I.; Abbott, S.M.; Zee, P.C.
Title Habitual Light Exposure Relative to Circadian Timing in Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Study Objectives

To compare melatonin timing, a well validated marker for endogenous circadian phase, and habitual light exposure patterns in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) and intermediate chronotype controls.

Methods

12 individuals with DSWPD (5 females, mean age 31.1) and 12 age matched controls (6 females, mean age 33.6) underwent a minimum of seven days of light and activity monitoring followed by an inpatient hospital stay, where blood was taken to assess melatonin timing (calculated as dim light melatonin onset – DLMO). Habitual light exposure patterns were then compared to a human phase response curve (PRC) to light.

Results

Relative to clock time, individuals with DSWPD had a later light exposure pattern compared to controls, but their light exposure pattern was earlier relative to DLMO. According to the human phase response curve (PRC) to light, individuals with DSWPD had less daily advancing light exposure compared to controls. The primary difference was seen in the late portion of the advancing window, in which individuals with DSWPD were exposed to fewer pulses of light of equivalent duration and intensity compared to controls.

Conclusions

Diminished advancing light exposure may play a role in the development and perpetuation of delayed sleep-wake timing in individuals with DSWPD. Enhancing light exposure during the later portion of the advancing window represents an innovative and complementary strategy that has the potential to improve the effectiveness of bright light therapy in DSWPD.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1990
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Author Savarese, M.; Di Perri, M.C.
Title Excessive sleepiness in shift work disorder: a narrative review of the last 5 years Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung Abbreviated Journal Sleep Breath
Volume (up) Issue Pages 1-14
Keywords Human Health; Alertness; Armodafinil; Insomnia; Performance; Shift work disorder; excessive sleepiness; StimulaCentral Nervous System Stimulants; Review
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Shift work sleep disorder (SWSD), also known as shift work disorder (SWD), is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness, associated with a recurring work schedule that overlaps the usual time designated for sleeping. PURPOSE: This article aims to provide a narrative review of the pharmacological trials conducted on SWD in the last 5 years, to better address safety and health issues inherent to this disorder. METHODS: An electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed. All eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cross-over RCTs with employees undertaking shift work (including night shifts) were considered, yielding three articles. RESULTS: All three studies showed the efficacy of armodafinil in improving subjective and objective sleepiness, clinical conditions, and global functioning regardless of shift duration. Both performance and driving simulator performance tests administered during the night shift bore better results following armodafinil administration than after placebo. However, armodafinil only reduced subjective disability in individuals working more than 9 h; furthermore, even after armodafinil, alertness was reduced but not normalized. CONCLUSION: These studies underscore the importance of preventing and/or minimizing disturbances due to shift work. This may be achieved through various strategies, such as the employer's commitment to adopt ergonomic criteria in shift design and to implement work-environment interventions like controlled bright light. Health personnel is of pivotal importance to detect potential factors of intolerance to shift work or early symptoms of SWD. Additional and improved studies are needed to further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.
Address Center of Sleep Medicine, UOSD of Neurophysiopathology and Disorders of Movement, AOU G Martino, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, 98121, Messina, Italy. mdiperri@wesleyan.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1520-9512 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31471831 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2662
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Author Akacem, L.D.; Wright, K.P.J.; LeBourgeois, M.K.
Title Bedtime and evening light exposure influence circadian timing in preschool-age children: A field study Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Neurobiol Sleep Circadian Rhythms
Volume (up) 1 Issue 2 Pages 27-31
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light exposure and sleep timing are two factors that influence inter-individual variability in the timing of the human circadian clock. The aim of this study was to quantify the degree to which evening light exposure predicts variance in circadian timing over and above bedtime alone in preschool children. Participants were 21 children ages 4.5-5.0 years (4.7 +/- 0.2 years; 9 females). Children followed their typical sleep schedules for 4 days during which time they wore a wrist actigraph to assess sleep timing and a pendant light meter to measure minute-by-minute illuminance levels in lux. On the 5th day, children participated in an in-home dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) assessment. Light exposure in the 2 h before bedtime was averaged and aggregated across the 4 nights preceding the DLMO assessment. Mean DLMO and bedtime were 19:22 +/- 01:04 and 20:07 +/- 00:46, respectively. Average evening light exposure was 710.1 +/- 1418.2 lux. Children with later bedtimes (lights-off time) had more delayed melatonin onset times (r=0.61, p=0.002). Evening light exposure was not independently associated with DLMO (r=0.32, p=0.08); however, a partial correlation between evening light exposure and DLMO when controlling for bedtime yielded a positive correlation (r=0.46, p=0.02). Bedtime explained 37.3% of the variance in the timing of DLMO, and evening light exposure accounted for an additional 13.3% of the variance. These findings represent an important step in understanding factors that influence circadian phase in preschool-age children and have implications for understanding a modifiable pathway that may underlie late sleep timing and the development of evening settling problems in early childhood.
Address Sleep and Development Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2451-9944 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28042611; PMCID:PMC5193478 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1755
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Author Lowden, A.; Lemos, N.; Gonçalves, B.; Öztürk, G.; Louzada, F.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Moreno, C.
Title Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume (up) 1 Issue 1 Pages 105-116
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2137
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