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Author Chang, A.-M.; Scheer, F.A.J.L.; Czeisler, C.A.; Aeschbach, D.
Title Direct effects of light on alertness, vigilance, and the waking electroencephalogram in humans depend on prior light history Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2013 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep
Volume 36 Issue 8 Pages 1239-1246
Keywords Arousal/*radiation effects; Attention/radiation effects; Cross-Over Studies; *Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood/physiology; Psychomotor Performance/radiation effects; Reaction Time; Wakefulness/*radiation effects; Young Adult; Light history; alertness and performance; light exposure
Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVES: Light can induce an acute alerting response in humans; however, it is unknown whether the magnitude of this response is simply a function of the absolute illuminance of the light itself, or whether it depends on illuminance history preceding the stimulus. Here, we compared the effects of illuminance history on the alerting response to a subsequent light stimulus. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover design was used to compare the effect of two illuminance histories (1 lux vs. 90 lux) on the alerting response to a 6.5-h 90-lux light stimulus during the biological night. SETTING: Intensive Physiologic Monitoring Unit, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen healthy young adults (6 F; 23.5 +/- 2.9 years). INTERVENTIONS: Participants were administered two 6.5-h light exposures (LE) of 90 lux during the biological night. For 3 days prior to each LE, participants were exposed to either 1 lux or 90 lux during the wake episode. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: The alerting response to light was assessed using subjective sleepiness ratings, lapses of attention, and reaction times as measured with an auditory psychomotor vigilance task, as well as power density in the delta/theta range of the waking EEG. The alerting response to light was greater and lasted longer when the LE followed exposure to 1 lux compared to 90 lux light. CONCLUSION: The magnitude and duration of the alerting effect of light at night depends on the illuminance history and appears to be subject to sensitization and adaptation.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. amchang@rics.bwh.harvard.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23904684; PMCID:PMC3700721 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 145
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Author Haus, E.L.; Smolensky, M.H.
Title Shift work and cancer risk: potential mechanistic roles of circadian disruption, light at night, and sleep deprivation Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med Rev
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 273-284
Keywords Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Epigenesis, Genetic/physiology; Humans; Light; Melatonin/physiology; Neoplasms/*etiology; Risk Factors; Sleep Deprivation/*complications; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology; oncogenesis
Abstract Shift work that includes a nighttime rotation has become an unavoidable attribute of today's 24-h society. The related disruption of the human circadian time organization leads in the short-term to an array of jet-lag-like symptoms, and in the long-run it may contribute to weight gain/obesity, metabolic syndrome/type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic studies also suggest increased cancer risk, especially for breast cancer, in night and rotating female shift workers. If confirmed in more controlled and detailed studies, the carcinogenic effect of night and shift work will constitute additional serious medical, economic, and social problems for a substantial proportion of the working population. Here, we examine the possible multiple and interconnected cancer-promoting mechanisms as a consequence of shift work, i.e., repeated disruption of the circadian system, pineal hormone melatonin suppression by exposure to light at night, sleep-deprivation-caused impairment of the immune system, plus metabolic changes favoring obesity and generation of proinflammatory reactive oxygen species.
Address Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Minnesota and Health Partners Medical Group, Regions Hospital, 640 Jackson Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55101, USA. Erhard.X.Haus@HealthPartners.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1087-0792 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23137527 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 157
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Author Kayaba, M.; Iwayama, K.; Ogata, H.; Seya, Y.; Tokuyama, K.; Satoh, M.
Title Drowsiness and low energy metabolism in the following morning induced by nocturnal blue light exposure Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume 14 Issue Pages e166-e167
Keywords blue light; light exposure; light at night; circadian disruption; drowsiness; melatonin; metabolism; sleep
Abstract Introduction

Evening light exposure debilitates the circadian rhythm and elicits sleep disturbance. Blue light peak wavelengths, around 460 nm, suppress melatonin secretion via the non-image-forming system. The effects of nocturnal blue light exposure on sleep have been reported to be specific but rather small (Münch, 2008). This study was designed to assess the effect of nocturnal blue light exposure on sleep and energy metabolism until noon the next day.

Materials and methods

Nine healthy male volunteers aged between 21 and 25 participated in this study which had a balanced cross-over design with intrasubject comparisons. After 2 h dark adaptation, the subjects were exposed to blue light or no light for 2 h. The peak wavelength of the blue LED was 465 nm, and the horizontal irradiance of the blue light at the height of eye was at 7.02fÊW/cm2. Sleep was recorded polysomnographically, and energy metabolism was measured with a whole body indirect calorimeter.

Results

There were no significant differences in sleep architecture and energy metabolism during the night. However, dozing (stages 1 and 2) was significantly higher (26.0 < 29.4 vs 6.3 < 8.1 min, P < 0.05), and energy expenditure, O2 consumption, CO2 production and the thermic effect of food (increase in energy expenditure after breakfast) were significantly lower the following morning in the blue light exposure subjects.

Conclusion

Contrary to our expectation, sleep architecture and energy metabolism during sleep were not affected by evening exposure to blue light. It might be due to our milder intervention by which subjects in a sitting position did not gaze at the light source set on the ceiling, while the subjects in previous studies directly received brighter light via custom built goggles (Cajochen, 2005; Münch, 2008) or gazed at a light source under the influence of mydriatic agents to dilate pupils (Brainard, 2001). New findings of the present study were that dozing (stages 1 and 2) was significantly increased, and energy metabolism was significantly lower the following morning in blue light exposed subjects. This suggests that modulation of the circadian rhythm is affected by nocturnal blue light exposure and the effect continues in the following daytime even if the intervention was mild.
Address University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 349
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Author Kim, J.; Hwang, K.; Cho, J.; Koo, D.; Joo, E.; Hong, S.
Title Effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background eeg rhythms Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume 14 Issue Pages e170
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Artificial lighting has benefited society by extending the length of a productive day, but it can be ”light pollution” when it becomes excessive. Unnecessary exposure to artificial light at night can cause myopia, obesity, metabolic disorders and even some type of cancers.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 502
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Author Chellappa, S.L.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.; Lang, D.; Gotz, T.; Krebs, J.; Cajochen, C.
Title Acute exposure to evening blue-enriched light impacts on human sleep Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2013 Publication Journal of Sleep Research Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Res
Volume 22 Issue 5 Pages 573-580
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light in the short wavelength range (blue light: 446-483 nm) elicits direct effects on human melatonin secretion, alertness and cognitive performance via non-image-forming photoreceptors. However, the impact of blue-enriched polychromatic light on human sleep architecture and sleep electroencephalographic activity remains fairly unknown. In this study we investigated sleep structure and sleep electroencephalographic characteristics of 30 healthy young participants (16 men, 14 women; age range 20-31 years) following 2 h of evening light exposure to polychromatic light at 6500 K, 2500 K and 3000 K. Sleep structure across the first three non-rapid eye movement non-rapid eye movement – rapid eye movement sleep cycles did not differ significantly with respect to the light conditions. All-night non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalographic power density indicated that exposure to light at 6500 K resulted in a tendency for less frontal non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic power density, compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K. The dynamics of non-rapid eye movement electroencephalographic slow wave activity (2.0-4.0 Hz), a functional index of homeostatic sleep pressure, were such that slow wave activity was reduced significantly during the first sleep cycle after light at 6500 K compared to light at 2500 K and 3000 K, particularly in the frontal derivation. Our data suggest that exposure to blue-enriched polychromatic light at relatively low room light levels impacts upon homeostatic sleep regulation, as indexed by reduction in frontal slow wave activity during the first non-rapid eye movement episode.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-1105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23509952 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2201
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