toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Lowden, A.; Lemos, N.; Gonçalves, B.; Öztürk, G.; Louzada, F.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Moreno, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2018 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 105-116  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2137  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, H.-B.; Whittaker, D.S.; Truong, D.; Mulji, A.K.; Ghiani, C.A.; Loh, D.H.; Colwell, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue light therapy improves circadian dysfunction as well as motor symptoms in two mouse models of Huntington's disease Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages 39-52  
  Keywords animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) exhibit movement disorders, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive impairments as the disease progresses. Abnormal sleep/wake cycles are common among HD patients with reports of delayed sleep onset, fatigue during the day, and a delayed pattern of melatonin secretion all of which suggest circadian dysfunction. Mouse models of HD confirm disrupted circadian rhythms with pathophysiology found in the central circadian clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus). Importantly, circadian dysfunction manifests early in disease, even before the classic motor symptoms, in both patients and mouse models. Therefore, we hypothesize that the circadian dysfunction may interact with the disease pathology and exacerbate the HD symptoms. If correct, early intervention may benefit patients and delay disease progression. One test of this hypothesis is to determine whether light therapy designed to strengthen this intrinsic timing system can delay the disease progression in mouse models. Therefore, we determined the impact of blue wavelength-enriched light on two HD models: the BACHD and Q175 mice. Both models received 6 hours of blue-light at the beginning of their daily light cycle for 3 months. After treatment, both genotypes showed improvements in their locomotor activity rhythm without significant change to their sleep behavior. Critically, treated mice of both lines exhibited improved motor performance compared to untreated controls. Focusing on the Q175 genotype, we sought to determine whether the treatment altered signaling pathways in brain regions known to be impacted by HD using NanoString gene expression assays. We found that the expression of several HD relevant markers was altered in the striatum and cortex of the treated mice. Our study demonstrates that strengthening the circadian system can delay the progression of HD in pre-clinical models. This work suggests that lighting conditions should be considered when managing treatment of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2451-9944 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1626  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wams, E.J.; Woelders, T.; Marring, I.; van Rosmalen, L.; Beersma, D.G.M.; Gordijn, M.C.M.; Hut, R.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Linking Light Exposure and Subsequent Sleep: A Field Polysomnography Study in Humans Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 40 Issue 12 Pages  
  Keywords actigraphy; chronobiology; circadian rhythms; scoring; sleep/wake mechanisms  
  Abstract Study objectives: To determine the effect of light exposure on subsequent sleep characteristics under ambulatory field conditions. Methods: Twenty healthy participants were fitted with ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) and wrist-actigraphs to assess light exposure, rest-activity, sleep quality, timing, and architecture. Laboratory salivary dim-light melatonin onset was analyzed to determine endogenous circadian phase. Results: Later circadian clock phase was associated with lower intensity (R2 = 0.34, chi2(1) = 7.19, p < .01), later light exposure (quadratic, controlling for daylength, R2 = 0.47, chi2(3) = 32.38, p < .0001), and to later sleep timing (R2 = 0.71, chi2(1) = 20.39, p < .0001). Those with later first exposure to more than 10 lux of light had more awakenings during subsequent sleep (controlled for daylength, R2 = 0.36, chi2(2) = 8.66, p < .05). Those with later light exposure subsequently had a shorter latency to first rapid eye movement (REM) sleep episode (R2 = 0.21, chi2(1) = 5.77, p < .05). Those with less light exposure subsequently had a higher percentage of REM sleep (R2 = 0.43, chi2(2) = 13.90, p < .001) in a clock phase modulated manner. Slow-wave sleep accumulation was observed to be larger after preceding exposure to high maximal intensity and early first light exposure (p < .05). Conclusions: The quality and architecture of sleep is associated with preceding light exposure. We propose that light exposure timing and intensity do not only modulate circadian-driven aspects of sleep but also homeostatic sleep pressure. These novel ambulatory PSG findings are the first to highlight the direct relationship between light and subsequent sleep, combining knowledge of homeostatic and circadian regulation of sleep by light. Upon confirmation by interventional studies, this hypothesis could change current understanding of sleep regulation and its relationship to prior light exposure. Clinical trial details: This study was not a clinical trial. The study was ethically approved and nationally registered (NL48468.042.14).  
  Address Chronobiology Unit, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29040758; PMCID:PMC5806586 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1885  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author WDS Killgore url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting the Way to Better Sleep and Health Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2016 Publication Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Disor: Treat Care  
  Volume 05 Issue 01 Pages  
  Keywords Health; Editorial  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2325-9639 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1442  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Joo, E.Y.; Abbott, S.M.; Reid, K.J.; Wu, D.; Kang, J.; Wilson, J.; Zee, P.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of light exposure and activity in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2016 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med  
  Volume 32 Issue Pages 259-265  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To characterize the patterns of light exposure and physical activity level and assess their relationship with sleep quality and depressive symptoms in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD). METHODS: 42 DSWPD (22 female, mean age 34.5 y) and 26 (+/-4 years) age-and-sex-matched controls (12 female, mean age 33.4 y) underwent seven days of light and activity monitoring. RESULTS: Individuals with DSWPD had significantly delayed bed times and wake times, but similar sleep duration compared to controls. Subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) was poorer in DSWPDs compared to controls. Those with DSWPD had significantly more activity and light exposure late at night (2:00-4:00) and significantly less activity and light exposure in the morning (8:00-11:00). Total 24 h levels of light and activity were not significantly different between DSWPD and controls. However, the DSWPD group had significantly more light exposure than controls 22 h after waking, during their sleep period. Later light exposure correlated with higher depression scores [Beck Depression Index (BDI)] and poorer sleep quality (PSQI). CONCLUSIONS: The light exposure patterns observed in DSWPD likely contribute to and perpetuate the chronically delayed sleep and wake phase in these patients. In addition, increased light exposure during the sleep period may also contribute to the poor sleep quality and mood disorders that are common in these individuals.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: p-zee@northwestern.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27964860 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1639  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: