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Author Esaki, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N.; Kitajima, T. url  doi
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  Title Association between light exposure at night and manic symptoms in bipolar disorder: cross-sectional analysis of the APPLE cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords (up) Human Health; Bipolar disorder; circadian rhythm; dark; light at night; manic symptom  
  Abstract Previous studies have found that keeping the room dark at night was associated with a decrease in manic symptoms for patients with bipolar disorder (BD). However, the association between light at night of real-life conditions and manic symptoms is unclear. We investigated the association between bedroom light exposure at night and manic symptoms in BD patients. One-hundred and eighty-four outpatients with BD participated in this cross-sectional study. The average light intensity at night during sleep was evaluated using a portable photometer for seven consecutive nights. Manic symptoms were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and scores >/=5 were treated as a “hypomanic state.” The median (interquartile range) YMRS score was 2.0 (0-5.0), and 52 (28.2%) participants were in a hypomanic state. The prevalence of a hypomanic state was significantly higher in the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than in those with <3 lux (36.7% versus 21.9%; P = .02). In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for BD type, depressive symptoms, sleep duration, and daytime physical activity, the odds ratio (OR) for a hypomanic state was significantly higher for the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than for those with <3 lux (OR: 2.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-4.22, P = .02). This association remained significant at the cutoff value of YMRS score >/=6 (OR: 2.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-5.46; P = .02). The findings of this study indicate bedroom light exposure at night is significantly associated with manic symptoms in BD patients. Although the results of this cross-sectional investigation do not necessarily imply causality, they may serve to inform beneficial nonpharmacological intervention and personalized treatment of BD patients.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32238002 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2924  
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