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Author (up) Khan, Z.A.; Yumnamcha, T.; Mondal, G.; Devi, S.D.; Rajiv, C.; Labala, R.K.; Sanjita Devi, H.; Chattoraj, A. url  doi
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  Title Artificial Light at Night (ALAN): A Potential Anthropogenic Component for the COVID-19 and HCoVs Outbreak Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Front Endocrinol (Lausanne)  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 622  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health; Review; ALAN; Covid-19; HCoVs; bat; melatonin; sustainability  
  Abstract The origin of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is zoonotic. The circadian day-night is the rhythmic clue to organisms for their synchronized body functions. The “development for mankind” escalated the use of artificial light at night (ALAN). In this article, we tried to focus on the possible influence of this anthropogenic factor in human coronavirus (HCoV) outbreak. The relationship between the occurrences of coronavirus and the ascending curve of the night-light has also been delivered. The ALAN influences the physiology and behavior of bat, a known nocturnal natural reservoir of many Coronaviridae. The “threatened” and “endangered” status of the majority of bat species is mainly because of the destruction of their proper habit and habitat predominantly through artificial illumination. The stress exerted by ALAN leads to the impaired body functions, especially endocrine, immune, genomic integration, and overall rhythm features of different physiological variables and behaviors in nocturnal animals. Night-light disturbs “virus-host” synchronization and may lead to mutation in the genomic part of the virus and excessive virus shedding. We also proposed some future strategies to mitigate the repercussions of ALAN and for the protection of the living system in the earth as well.  
  Address Biological Rhythm Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Kazi Nazrul University, Asansol, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-2392 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33013700; PMCID:PMC7511708 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3169  
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