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Author (up) Taillard, J.; Capelli, A.; Sagaspe, P.; Anund, A.; Akerstedt, T.; Philip, P. url  doi
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  Title In-car nocturnal blue light exposure improves motorway driving: a randomized controlled trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Issue 10 Pages e46750  
  Keywords Adult; *Automobile Driving; Caffeine/pharmacology; Coffee/chemistry; Cross-Over Studies; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/*prevention & control; Humans; Light; Male; Middle Aged; *Photic Stimulation; Placebos; Psychomotor Performance/drug effects/radiation effects; Reproducibility of Results; Sleep Deprivation; Sleep Stages/radiation effects; Wakefulness/drug effects/physiology/*radiation effects; blue light  
  Abstract Prolonged wakefulness greatly decreases nocturnal driving performance. The development of in-car countermeasures is a future challenge to prevent sleep-related accidents. The aim of this study is to determine whether continuous exposure to monochromatic light in the short wavelengths (blue light), placed on the dashboard, improves night-time driving performance. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 48 healthy male participants (aged 20-50 years) drove 400 km (250 miles) on motorway during night-time. They randomly and consecutively received either continuous blue light exposure (GOLite, Philips, 468 nm) during driving or 2*200 mg of caffeine or placebo of caffeine before and during the break. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. The outcomes were number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) and mean standard deviation of the lateral position (SDLP). Eight participants (17%) complained about dazzle during blue light exposure and were removed from the analysis. Results from the 40 remaining participants (mean age +/- SD: 32.9+/-11.1) showed that countermeasures reduced the number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) (F(2,91.11) = 6.64; p<0.05). Indeed, ILC were lower with coffee (12.51 [95% CI, 5.86 to 19.66], p = 0.001) and blue light (14.58 [CI, 8.75 to 22.58], p = 0.003) than with placebo (26.42 [CI, 19.90 to 33.71]). Similar results were found for SDLP. Treatments did not modify the quality, quantity and timing of 3 subsequent nocturnal sleep episodes. Despite a lesser tolerance, a non-inferior efficacy of continuous nocturnal blue light exposure compared with caffeine suggests that this in-car countermeasure, used occasionally, could be used to fight nocturnal sleepiness at the wheel in blue light-tolerant drivers, whatever their age. More studies are needed to determine the reproducibility of data and to verify if it can be generalized to women. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01070004.  
  Address University of Bordeaux, Sommeil, Attention et Neuropsychiatrie, USR 3413, Bordeaux, France. jack.taillard@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23094031; PMCID:PMC3477137 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 347  
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